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Publication numberUS2634743 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1953
Filing dateAug 25, 1947
Priority dateFeb 27, 1946
Publication numberUS 2634743 A, US 2634743A, US-A-2634743, US2634743 A, US2634743A
InventorsPierre Audemar
Original AssigneePierre Audemar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Control valve mechanism
US 2634743 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 14 1953 P. AUDEMAR 2,634,743

CONTROL VALVE MECHANISM Filed Aug. 25, 1947 Patented pr. 14, l 1953 CONTROL VALVE MECHANISM Pierre Audemar, La Garenne-Colombes, France Application August 25, 1947 Serial No. 7 70,525 In France February Z7, 11946 Section 1, Public Law 690, August 8, 1946 Patent expires February 327, 1966 4 Claims.

This invention relates to control valve mechanism for use in connection with hydraulic transmission systems comprising two transmitters constituted each for example by a piston displaceable in a cylinder, both cylinders being interconnected by a pipe line into which is branched, at right angles thereto, a conduit adapted to operate the receiver such Vfor exam?- pleas the piston of a hydraulic jack.

. The problem is -how to act upon one of said transmitters without sending the fluid medium into the other, while introducing the same into the receiver.

. With a View to solving this problem Ait has been proposed to mount in the pipe line interconnecting the two transmitters, and von both sides of the `conduit leading into the receiver, two valve seats between which may move freely a double-acting valve adapted, when pushed by the iiuid medium coming through the pipe line from one transmitter that has just been actuated, to cut off the communication with the other.

.Such an arrangement, however, while behaving pretty well when sudden transmissions are necessary determining `a quick displacement of the hydraulic fluid, is ineicient when slow displacements are dealt with, because the doubleacting valve remains in its median position and allows the hydraulic uid to flow into vthe un' actuated transmitter, a fact lwhich presents a serious inconvenience.

The present invention has for its object to provide in a simple and ecient structure a novel control valve mechanism which shall obviate said 'inconvenience and permit the receiver to be operated -by one or the other of the'two trans.- mitters, without allowing the hydraulic iiuid to penetrate into the unactuated transmitter, whatever may be the velocity with which the piston of the actuated transmitter vis displaced.

`With this and other objects in view, the invention resides in the novel features Aof construction and arrangements of parts, as more fully hereinafter set forth.

In the accompanying drawing, Ain which vlike reference characters indicate like parts,

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view showing a hydraulic transmission system comprising two transmitters,.a receiver and a control valve mechanism ,according to the present invention;

Fig. 2 isa diagrammatic view showing a hydraulic transmission system comprising four transmitter, a receiver and Athree control valve mechanism 4according vto the invention;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view showing the structure of the control valve ,mech-anism according to the invention; and

Fig. V4 shows a portion of the Vdevice of Fig. v3 wherein the parts occupy lanother position. i

Referring first to Fig. 1, designated by VI and 2 are two transmitter unit, 3 is a receiver unit, 6 is a control valve mechanism designed according to the present invention, 4 is a conduit leading from the control valve mechanism 6 into the receiver unit 3 while .5a ,and A5b are pipes connecting the transmitter `units I and 2, respectively, with the `control valve mechanism kB. 'lf-he piston of the receiver unit 3 is Vconstantly acted upon by a spring so that the vpiston may .be restored to its initial position whenever the transmitters become inoperative.

In Fig. 2 is shown a hydraulic transmission system comprising four transmitter units. In this case it is necessary to provide three control valve mechanism according -to the invention. The receiver may be constituted for example by a diierential hydraulic jack of which the face opposed to that acted upon by the liquid pressure exerted by one of the transmitters is constantly under a hydraulic pressure exerted through a Aconduit C.

Figs. 3 and 4 are enlarged showings of the control valve mechanism 6. In these figures, 'Ia is the valve seat corresponding to the pipe `5a,'whi1le Ib is a valve-seat corresponding to the pipe 5b. Arranged `between these Vvtwo seats is a two-face valve 8 carrying two coaxial rods 9a and Sfb, respectively. Designated by Illa and lIlb are two pistons arranged on both sides of the conduit 4. Within each piston is provided a chamber in which is positioned a ball I2 adapted to close .a coaxial 4opening I3 and to be pressed against ythe latter bya spring :I I. Designated by I5 is an abutment adapted to limit the displacements of l.the iball I2 within the chamber, while by I6 are designated openings permitting the chamber :to communicate l.with the pipes 5a and 5b, respectively. `The .two Apistons laila .and I'Ub are furged, r`the formen-toward 'the left and the latter .toward the ,right as viewed vin Fig. 3, by springs nl.

The A,operation is briefly as follows: If for example `the Itransmitter unit 2 is actuated, the hydraulic .fluid will Vflow into the valve mecha- 11ism.6fthrough .pipe 5b and-push Yto the left the piston 10b whose ball I2, when contacting the valve yrod 3b, will move the two-face valve 8 tothe left .and finally apply said yvalve .against its seat la.. `From this ytime on, as the piston 3 lDb acted upon by the liquid pressure keeps on moving to the left, the movement of ball l2 is stopped by the rod 9b so that the right end of the opening I3 will move away from the ball l2 to permit communication between the chamber within the piston b and the conduit 4. Subsequent movement of the piston lub will bring ball l2 in contact with the abutmentI i5, whereafter the piston lb is immobilized in a position indicated by dash-and-dot lines 10c in Fig. 4, the liquid under pressure being thus allowed to Iiow freely through the piston chamber, past the ball I2, and further through the intermediate conduit 4 into the receiver unit 3. It is clear that the displacement of the valve 8 is entirely independent from the velocity of i'low of the hydraulic fluid. It follows therefrom that owing to the deviceV of the invention a faultless hydraulic transmission can be secured in all conditions of operation.

The .devicer of the invention lends itself to many applications. Thus, for example, it may be used for controlling brakes, for example brakes of a railway train. It may further be applied to allsorts of transmissions to a distance.

This device, however, is particularly intended to be applied to double transmissions, more particularly to double transmissions for use in connection with iiying machines to which it assures full working safety.

It will be understood that the invention is not limited to the particular examples shown, as changes may be made therein without substantially departing from the spirit of the invention which is intended to be defined in the accompanying claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A control valve mechanism for use in connection with hydraulic transmission systems including at least two transmitters and one re- A ceiver, comprising a casing having two inlet chambers and an outlet chamber located between said inlet chambers and communicating with the same through ports, a two-face valve member located between said ports for controlling communication between each of said inlet chambers and said outlet chamber, a stem extending from each'face of said valve member, a pressure responsive valve operating element in each inlet chamber having an opening in alignment with said stems for establishing a communication between the inlet ports and the outlet chamber, and valve means for controlling said openings adapted to act on said stems so as to engage said two-face valve member to interrupt communication between one of said inlet chambers and said outlet chamber on initial movement of the Valve operating element in the other inlet chamber, and to permit communication between the inlet port of Said other inlet chamber and said outlet chamber on subsequent movement of said element. v

2. A control valve mechanism for'use in connection with hydraulic transmission systems including at least two transmitters and a single receiver, comprising two parallel cylindrical inlet chambers provided with inlet ports, an outlet chamber between said inlet chambers and communicating therewith through ports, a twoface valve member in said outlet chamber located between said ports for controlling communication between said inlet chambers and said outlet chamber, a stem extending from each face of said Valve member into one of said inlet chambers, a hollow piston in'each of said inlet cham- 'niA bers responsive to the liquid pressure introduced into said inlet chambers through one or the other of said inlet ports, each piston having an axial opening in alignment with said stems for establishing communication between the spaces at the front and rear of the piston, and check Valves for controlling said openings adapted to act on. said stems so as to engage said two-face valve member to interrupt communication between one of said inlet chambers and said outlet chamber on initial movement of the piston in the other inlet chamber, the arrangement being such that the check valve in said other inlet chamber is opened by the corresponding stem to permit communication between the inlet port of said other inlet chamber and the outlet chamber on subsequent movement of the piston in said other inlet chamber.

3. A control valve mechanism for use in connection with hydraulic transmission systems including at least two transmitters and one receiver connected by pipe lines, comprising a casing, two spaced valve seats arranged within said casing and corresponding each to the respective inlet pipe supplying the liquid under pressure, a two-faced valve member located between said valve seats and adapted to apply against either of them, two opposed rods protruding each from the corresponding valve face, two hollow pistons arranged each within the corresponding end portion of said casing between said rods and said inlet pipes, resilient means interposed between each valve seat and the corresponding piston for limiting the displacement of the latter, a. valve arranged in a hole in each piston and adapted. when the piston is acted upon by the incoming liquid, to cause the two-faced valve member through its respective rod to apply against one of its seats, and intermediate piping leading from the space between said valve seats into said receiver.

4. A control valve mechanism for use in connection with hydraulic transmission systems including at least two transmitters and one receiver connected by pipe lines, comprising a casing, two spaced valve seats arranged within said casing and corresponding each to the respective inlet pipe supplying the liquid under pressure, a two-faced valve member located between said valve seats land adapted to apply against either of them, two opposed rods protruding each from the corresponding valve face, two pistons arranged each within the corresponding end portion of said casing between said rods and said inlet pipes, a counterspring interposed between each valve seat and the corresponding piston for limiting the displacement of each piston, a chamber arranged within each piston, adapted to be lled up with the incoming pressure liquid and provided on its front face with an opening co-aXial with one of said valve rods, a ball disposed in front of said opening and displaceable within said chamber, a second counterspring and an abutment interposed between the bottom of said chamber and said ball for limiting the displacement of the same, and an outlet pipe leading from the space between said valve seats into said receiver, said ball being intended to close said opening when its piston is unactuated bythe pressure liquid, but when it is actuated thereby, rst to cause the said two-faced valve member by vacting upon its respective rod,'to close its remote seat and then to be moved away from said opening by said rod so as to allow said pressure liquid to flow freely through said chamber, past said ball, through said outlet pipe Number out of said casing and into said receiver. 2,342,878 PIERRE AUDEMAR. 2,380,507 2,416,091 References Cited in the le of this patent 5 4911812 UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Number 2,215,819 Ludeman Sept. 24, 1940 344,397 2,216,855 Sanford Oct. 8, 1940 lo 543,394

2,311,955 Marker Feb. 23, 1943 Name Date Majern Feb. 29, 1944 Eaton July 31, 1945 Fitch Feb. 18, 1947 I-Ioiacker Dec. 20, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Italy of 1936 Great Britain of 1942

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738797 *Dec 26, 1951Mar 20, 1956C O Two Fire Equipment CoTwo-way check valve
US2761463 *Dec 17, 1953Sep 4, 1956William WagnerTwo-way check valve
US2794518 *Sep 21, 1953Jun 4, 1957Trabon Engineering CorpLubricating system and sequence valve therefor
US2853091 *May 13, 1955Sep 23, 1958Napier & Son LtdHydraulic apparatus for providing a differential pressure
US2904069 *Oct 3, 1955Sep 15, 1959Teves Kg AlfredPressure regulator for harmonic pressure distribution
US2918902 *Dec 6, 1954Dec 29, 1959Vickers IncSingle station variable length stroke motor control system
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US3633606 *Aug 7, 1969Jan 11, 1972Air ReductionAutomatic changeover valve
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US4019525 *Jan 22, 1976Apr 26, 1977Sloan Valve CompanyTractor protection valve
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US4726190 *May 19, 1986Feb 23, 1988International Sanitary Ware Mfg. Cy.Pressure generator with check valve
US5469751 *May 25, 1994Nov 28, 1995Sentry Equipment Corp.For controlling flow of fluid
US5878773 *Sep 15, 1997Mar 9, 1999Essef CorporationAuxiliary flow path valve
US6257268Sep 1, 2000Jul 10, 2001Gilmore Valve CompanyPressure biased shuttle valve
US6318400Dec 1, 1999Nov 20, 2001Gilmore Valve CompanyLow interflow hydraulic shuttle valve
US6655405Jul 20, 2001Dec 2, 2003Cilmore Valve Co.BOP operating system with quick dump valve
US6779543Oct 29, 2003Aug 24, 2004Gilmore Valve Co., Ltd.BOP operating system with quick dump valve
US8171951 *Jun 30, 2007May 8, 2012Festo Ag & Co. KgValve with an AND-function
US8689814 *Mar 24, 2011Apr 8, 2014Michael D. Holt Company, LlcRegulated automatic changeover valve
US20100032036 *Jun 30, 2007Feb 11, 2010Festo Ag & Co. KgValve with an and-function
US20110232780 *Mar 24, 2011Sep 29, 2011Glen ArnottRegulated automatic changeover valve
DE3527371A1 *Jul 31, 1985Feb 12, 1987Teves Gmbh AlfredPressure-actuated reversing valve
EP0096609A1 *May 24, 1983Dec 21, 1983André SarsiWalking aid
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/112, 91/33, 137/606, 60/567, 137/627.5, 137/512, 137/628, 60/581, 137/45
International ClassificationF15B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF15B7/003
European ClassificationF15B7/00C