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Publication numberUS2634812 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1953
Filing dateAug 3, 1950
Priority dateAug 3, 1950
Publication numberUS 2634812 A, US 2634812A, US-A-2634812, US2634812 A, US2634812A
InventorsAllemang Ellsworth P
Original AssigneeAllemang Ellsworth P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Splash guard for oil well tubing
US 2634812 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 14, 1953 E. P. ALLEMANG SPLASH GUARD FOR OIL WELL TUBING 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 Filed Aug. 5, 1950 INVENTOR. Q W

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April 14, 1953 E. P. ALLEMANG SPLASH GUARD FOR on. WELL TUBING 2 SlIEETS-SHEET 2 Filed Aug. 3, 1950 L 4 INVENTOR.

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Patented Apr. 14, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE signor to Ellsworth P. Allemang, County, Ohio, as trustee Medina Application August 3, 1950, Serial No. 177,420 7 Claims. (01. 166-1) 1 This invention relates to a splash guard for use in connection with the removal of oil well tubing from oil wells.

In the drilling, cleaning and servicing of oil pling of the tubing is exposed at a convenient working level above the ground. Thereupon, while the upper length of tubing is thus suspended, the joint is broken, the withdrawn tubing above the joint is swung aside and released from the tool, and the gripping tool again is connected to the upper end of the tubing which is in the drill hole so as to draw out another length of the tubing. Frequently, in drawing such tubing, as much as thirty feet of tubing are exposed above the joint that is to be broken and often this length of tubing is filled with oil, thus providing a hydrostatic head of many feet of oil at the joint.

The joint is broken by gripping the coupling and holding it stationary while rotating the portion of the tubing thereabove, thus screwing the tubing out of the top of the coupling. During this operation, the drawn tubing is still suspended from the derrick and when the coupling is broken, the lower disconnected end of the drawn tubing is swung into offset relation to that portion of the tubing remaining in the well so that the oil can run out into a suitable ground sump surrounding the casing in the drill hole. However, when the drawn tubing is unscrewed so that only a very few threads are in engagement with the coupling, the pressure of the oil head or gas forces the oil between the few remaining threads, causing it to squirt upwardly from between the coupling and the tubing and this continues and increases progressively as the suspended part of the tubing is unscrewed and until it is swung laterally into offset relation with the coupling so as to drain freely into the sump. Heretofore, the practice in oil fields has been to wrap gunny sacks or cloth and the like around the joint to be broken. While this is to some extent effective for confining the escaping oil and preventing the spraying of the oil over a wide area, it does not protect the operator sufficiently as the oil squirts through such makeshift guards, splattering the operator from head to foot.

Furthermore, the installation of such a guard,

if it is to be made reasonably effective, is a time consuming operation.

The present invention relates to a splash guard which is readily detachably connectable to the tubing, and, while the tubing is being uncoupled, prevents the spraying of the oil not only over a wide area about the well but also onto the operator, and instead relieves the pressure and directs the oil downwardly into the sump in a relatively confined stream.

In general the present splash guard comprises an elongated sleeve adapted to enclose a portion of the tubing and joint, the sleeve being in the form of a plurality of sections which are arranged to be moved apart so that, when held in upright position, they can be installed on a length of tubing by movement radially of the tubing and closed about the tubing, clamping jaws being provided on the sections so as to embrace the tubing above the coupling and rest on the upper end of. the coupling, means being provided to secure the sections in this relation to the tubing but to permit their ready removal, space being provided between the sections and tubing above the level of the jaws to receive the streams of oil which squirt out during uncoupling and to confine them within the guard, the guard having an opening at the bottom for the drainage downwardly therefrom of oil discharged into the guard.

The guard extends below the jaws an amount such that, when the jaws are resting on the top of the coupling, the lower edge of the guard is below the upper end of the coupling and is above the lower end of the coupling a distance such as to afiord ready access to the coupling by a conventional wrench.

For the purposes of illustration, I have shown a number of preferred embodiments of my invention, it being apparent from the illustrative examples that a number of modifications may be made therein without departing from the scope and principles of the present invention.

Specific objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following description wherein reference is made to the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of a coupled portion of the drawn oil well tubingwith the splash guard of the present invention installed thereon, part of the guard being shown in section for clearness in illustration;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the guard of the present invention, showing the same in open position for movement into installed position on a tubing;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the guard illustrated in Fig. 2 but showing the same in closed position;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of the guard taken on a plane indicated by the line 4-3 of Fig. 3;

Figs. and 6 are cross sectional views taken on the lines 5-5 and 6-6, respectively, of Fig. 3;

Fig. '7 is a cross sectional view similar to Fig. 6 but showing the guard in open position;

Referring first to Fig. 1, the drill hole or well, indicated at W, is provided with the usual casing C. At the upper end of the-- drill hole is aground sump S into which oil may be drained from a length of tubing after its withdrawal from the well.

The tubing comprises lengths of pipe P which are in threaded engagement with opposite ends of a collar or coupling D. In breaking the coupling, the usual. practice is for one workman to grip the coupling or collar D witha wrenclnsuch as indicated at A, and another workman to grip the pipe P above the level of the coupling with a wrench B. The pipe P is turned. withthe wrench B by one Workman. while the other workman holds the coupling stationary, thus breaking. the coupling. During. this operation, the upper length of pipe P is suspended from the usual derrick.

As the connection. is being broken, the oil in the upper pipe. P squirts. out of the coupling D, first following around the threads between the tubing. and coupling and issuing asa thinstream, sheet or jet which increases in size and velocity as the lower end of the upper length of the tubing or pipe P reaches the upper end of the coupling. This squirting out of the oil continues after disconnection of the tubing and coupling while the tubing is raised and being swung to a partially ofiset position laterally of the coupling to drain to the sump S. The stream of oil striking the coupling likewise is directed laterally and, if unguarded spreads over a. considerable area.

In accordance with the present invention, a splash guard is provided, which is in the form of a sleeve, indicated generally at I. The sleeve i is placed about the upper length of pipe P' and is arranged so that it extends an appreciable distance below the top' of the coupling D, means being provided for holding the sleeve in place in this position. The sleeve is arranged so as to aiford a substantial pocket above the coupling D into which the oil may squirt and surge so as to break its force while it is confined; so that it can drain only downwardly from the lower part of the sleeve.

Referring to Figs. 2 through 7, the sleeve I is normally closed so as to entirely surround the pipe. The sleeve is comprised of. a plurality of sections, any desired number of which may be utilized. However, for the purpose of illustrating the present invention, two only are shown, these being designated at 2 and 3, respectively. Thus each section in this form of the invention comprises one-half of the resultant sleeve. At one of its lateral margins, the section 2 is hingedly connected to an adjacent lateral margin of the section 3 by means of a suitable hinge 4. The

hinge 4 preferably is in the form of a piano hinge so as to completely close the space between the adjacent edges of the sections. The opposite lateral edge of the section 3 is provided with a reversely bent margin 5 which forms a channel opening toward the other lateral margins of the section 2 so that the margin 6 0f the section 2 may fit telescopically within the resultant channel when the sections are moved to closed position by swinging them about the hinge axis.

Mounted on each of the sections 2 and 3 are jaws and 8, respectively, these jaws having inner surfaces shaped and adapted to engage the desired diameter of tubing or pipe P firmly when the sections 2' and 3 are in relatively closed position.

Means are provided for holding the sections in relatively closed positions while permitting them to be moved to a relatively open position such as illustrated in Fig. 2 wherein the sleeve is. open at one side so that it may be moved into position onto the pipe or tubing radially thereof. For the purposes of illustration this means has been shown as a suitable tension coil spring 9 which is operatively connected at its ends to the sections, 2 and 3, respectively, at a location radially of the sleeve near to the hinge so as not to obstructthe movement. of the pipe into position between the jaws i and 8.

For convenience in mounting the jaws i and 3, the sections 2 and 3 are provided with bands of metal [.0 and I I, respectively, which fit against and are secured to the inner walls of the sections 2-and 3 and are connected at their ends to ends of'bands of metal forming the jaws. The specific detail and mounting of the jaws is relatively unimportant. However, the jaws l' and B are arranged near the bottom of the sleeve so that while gripping the tubing they may rest on the upper end of the c'oupling'and thus position the sleeve so as to expose below the level of its bottoma sufficient length of coupling for convenient gripping by the Wrench while assuring that the bottom of thesleeve is a sufficient distance below the upper end of the. coupling to prevent the escape of any oil. laterally from the sleeve at the joint.

It will be noted that passages 12 are provided between each jaw and its associated section of the sleeve so that the oil issuing from the joint can pass readily upwardly into the sleeve before its force is interrupted. Since the sleeve is elongated, there is thus provided a surge pocket which dissipates the force and prevents splashing around thebottom of the sleeve.

Instead the escaping oil can only surge onto the upper portion of the sleeve and then drain down the inner walls thereof. and discharge downwardly.

The upper end of the sleeve sections 2 and 3 may be so arranged that they embrace the pipe P closely to prevent the escape of oil between their upper ends and pipe P. However, in some instances this might interfere with the gripping of the pipe by the jaws due to irregularities in the pipe P or accumulation of foreign matter on. the surface thereof. Preferably, therefore, a suitable baffle 13 is provided at the top of the sections 2 and 3. The baiiie I3 preferably is radially yieldable so as to snugly embrace the pipe without interfering. with the proper closure of the jaws and their proper gripping relation with the pipe. In the form illustrated, the baflle. is made in two sections which are substantially coextensive peripherally with thesleeve sections 2 and 3. Each section of the bailie is in the form of a collar having slight annular end. flange. I 4 and peripheral wall [51. Thefiange [4? is. secured to a suitable split annulus !!i which. in turn is? secured to the sections 2 and 3, respectively, as bestillustrated in Fig. 4. The baffle. is madeof relatively light metal and the peripheral wall thereof is provided with longitudinal slits which are distributed about its periphery so as to provide a number of segments or tongues I! which may flex and accommodate themselves to any substantial irregularities on the surface of the pipe P.

For convenience in opening the guard and installing it on a pipe, handles l8 are provided on the sections 2 and 3. The handles extend generally longitudinally of the sections and are arranged near to, but at opposite sides of, the pivotal axis. They are preferably so spaced that both can be gripped concurrently by one hand and pulled toward each other so as to open the sleeve along one side, for installation on the pipe P, by swinging the sections 2 and 3 outwardly about the hinge axis against the force of the spring 9. While held in this position, the guard is moved into position so that the jaws can receive the pipe P therebetween by relative radial movement of the sleeve and pipe. Thereupon the handles are released and the spring 9 draws the sections together to the position best illustrated in Figs. 3 and 6 in which the sleeve is peripherally closed and the jaws I and 8 are in sufficiently firm embracing relation to maintain the guard in place. Thus the guard can be installed readily by a workman while he is holding one of the wrenches A and B in place. The gripping of the jaws I and 8 is sufiicient to hold the guard at a given position along the length of the pipe P. However, it is desirable that the jaws rest on the upper end of the coupling D so as to assure proper positioning of the bottom of the guard relative to the coupling, this proper positioning being that in which the sleeve extends as far downward from the upper end of the coupling as possible while affording a convenient space for applying a wrench to the coupling at a level below the lower end of the sleeve.

Thus the guard embodies a sleeve formed of a plurality of sections which may be moved to an open pipe receiving position or to a closed pipe enclosing position, with means for holding them in the latter position and for permitting them to be moved when desired to open position, selectively.

The guard may be readily opened and installed on a length of tubing with one hand which is desirable inasmuch as one of the workmen breaking the coupling can maintain his grip on the wrench used for uncoupling and install the guard with the other hand.

I claim:

1. A splash guard adapted to surround a length of pipe and comprising an upright elongated peripherally closed sleeve which is open at the top and bottom and which has two relatively rigid sleeve sections, hinge means hingedly connecting one of said sections at one of its lateral margins to a lateral margin of the other for swinging movement of the sections from a closed position in which the opposite lateral margins are together to close the sleeve to an open position in which the sleeve is open at one side for its full length for receiving an upright length of pipe radially, inwardly extending jaws connected to the sections, respectively, for movement therewith, and adapted, when the sections are moved into closed position, to embrace a length of pipe and irictionally clamp the sleeve thereto in fixed axial position thereon and for rotation therewith and with its peripheral wall in surrounding spaced relation to the pipe, spring means operatively connected at its opposite ends to the sections respectively and normally operable to move the sections and jaws into said closed position and to yieldably hold them in said closed position with the jaws so frictionally clamped to the pipe, said sections including means at a level above the jaws for closely surrounding the pipe when the sections are in closed position, handle means connected to the sections and adapted to be grasped in one hand of an operator and operated by said one hand for opening the sections, said spring means being of such strength that the sections can be moved to open position against the force of the spring means by said operation of the handle means by said one hand, and said sleeve being suiiiciently light in weight so'that it can be supported and held frictionally by the force of the spring means in said axial position on, and for said rotation with, the pipe and manipulated readily to and from operating position by said one hand.

2. A splash guard according to claim 1 characterized in that said spring means are offset from the axis of the sleeve toward the side of the sleeve adjacent to the hinge so as to leave the open sleeve unobstructed for said radial reception of the pipe.

3. A splash guard according to claim 1 characterized in that the spring means comprises a tension spring chordally arranged relative to the closed sleeve between the radially inward limits of the jaws and inner-periphery of the sleeve adjacent to the hinge.

4. A splash guard according to claim 1 characterized in that'said jaws are in the lower portion of the sleeve and the sleeve terminates a distance below the jaws such that the jaws can rest on the upper end of a coupling collar for the pipe with the lower edge of the sleeve terminating a substantial distance above the lower edge of the collar, thereby to expose a sufficient portion of the length of the collar below the level of the sleeve for engagement by a wrench.

5. A splash guard adapted to surround a length of pipe and comprising an upright elongated peripherally closed sleeve which is open at the top and bottom, said sleeve including a pair of relatively rigid sleeve sections, hinge means hingedly connected to one lateral margin of each section and connecting the sections for swinging movement relative to each other from a closed position in which the other lateral margins are together to an open position in which said other lateral margins are spaced apart for their full length for receiving an upright length of pipe radially into the sleeve therepast, inwardly extending jaws connected to the sections, respectively, for movement therewith and adapted, when the sections are moved into closed position, to embrace a length of pipe and frictionally clamp the sleeve thereto in fixed axial position thereon and for rotation therewith and with its peripheral wall in surrounding spaced relation to the pipe, spring means operatively connected at its opposite ends to the sections, respectively, and normally operable to move the sections and jaws into said closed position and to yieldably hold the jaws in said position with the jaws so frictionally clamped to the pipe, and said sections including means at a level above the jaws for closely surrounding the pipe when the sections are in closed position, handles on the sections, respectively, and spaced from the hinge means and projecting outwardly from the sleeve in a position such that they may be grasped concurrently in one hand of an operatorxandrmoveditoward eachother; by nexure of saidhandior opening the-sleeve, said spring 'means being 013811011 strength that the sections can-be :molved :to' 'said; open, position against the force of the spring means by said: movement of the handles .by said-Jone hand, saidsleeve. being sufficiently light .in weight so that it can be supported and. held frictionally by the force of the spring means in said axial position and for rotation with the pipe, and manipulated readily to and from operating position by said one hand while the'sleeve is held open byx'said one hand.

62 A splash guard'adapte'dtosurround a length or pipe and comprising an upright elongated peripherally closed frusto 'conical sleeve which is open at the top and bottom and which comprises two elongated relatively rigid sleeve sections, one of said sections being hinge'dly connected atone of its lateral margins to alateral margin of the other for swinging movement from a closed position in which the opposite lateral margins are together to close the sleeve to an open position in which the sleeveis open at one side for its full length for receiving an-upright length of pipe radially, inwardly extending jaws connected to the sections, respectively, for movement therewith and adapted, when the sections are moved into closed position, to embrace a length of pipe and frictionally clamp, the sleeve thereto in fixed axial position thereon and for rotation therewith and with its peripheral wall in, surrounding spaced relation to the pipe; spring means operatively connected at its opposite, ends to the sections, respectively, and normally operable to move the sections and jaws into said closed position and to yieldably hold them in said closed position with the jaws so frictionally clamped to the pipe,

handles on the sections, respectively, and spaced from the hinge axis and projecting outwardly from the sleeve in a position such, that they may be grasped concurrent-1y in one hand ofa-n -op erator and thereby pressed toward each other for openingt-he sleeve against the force of the spring means, the inner diameter of the upper end portion of the sleeve being substantially equal to the diameter of the pipe that can be embraced by the jaws when thesleeveis in a closed position, said spring means being of such strength that the sections can be moved to open position against the force of the spring by movement of the handles toward each other by said one hand of the operator, and said sleeve being sufficient-ly light in weight'so thatit can be supportedand heldfrictionally by the force of the spring in said, axial position and for rotation with the pipe, and manipulated readily to and from operating position by said one hand-:- 1

7. A splash guard according to claim 1 characterized in that the hinge means comprises a piano type, hinge and it extends substantially the full length of said sleeve. p A v ELLSWORT-H P. G.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 7 Name Date 1,159,230 Kerns Nov. 2, 1915 1,252,652 Bell Jan. 8, 1913 1,632,889 Davis June 21, 1927 2,096,882 Chernosk'y Oct. 26, 193*? 2,213,923 Stuart Sept. '3, 1940 2,214,428 Miller Sept. 10, 1940 2,222,191 Zisman Nov. 19, 1940 2,318,466 Cooper -7 May 4, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1159230 *Oct 29, 1913Nov 2, 1915Francis T KernsOil-saving device for oil-wells.
US1252652 *Oct 13, 1917Jan 8, 1918William Thomas BellOil-saver.
US1632889 *Jul 3, 1924Jun 21, 1927Davis Lewis FOil saver and antisplasher
US2096882 *Jun 11, 1936Oct 26, 1937Chernosky Frank EFluid saving device
US2213923 *Aug 22, 1939Sep 3, 1940Clyde StuartOil well pump rod cleaner
US2214428 *Apr 15, 1939Sep 10, 1940Miller William JMud box
US2222191 *Aug 7, 1939Nov 19, 1940Zissnan Louis HLine cleaning device
US2318466 *Nov 17, 1941May 4, 1943Ernest CooperProtecting apron for well tubing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2868228 *Feb 5, 1954Jan 13, 1959Peters & Russell IncExhaust extension
US3270810 *Feb 13, 1963Sep 6, 1966Johnston Leslie APolished rod protector and blow deflector
US3322198 *Feb 25, 1965May 30, 1967Mchenry William LSafety hood apparatus for drilling heads
US3746107 *Oct 29, 1971Jul 17, 1973Dresser IndHopper for an earth boring machine
US3783939 *Mar 30, 1972Jan 8, 1974Collins LSpray shield for oil wells
US3902555 *Oct 25, 1973Sep 2, 1975Collins Lloyd OSpray shield for oil wells
US7325599 *Oct 31, 2005Feb 5, 2008John BarkerSafety shield for rotary drilling rigs
US7458618 *Jan 18, 2005Dec 2, 2008Fm Global TechnologiesFixed flange spray deflector
US8628629 *Nov 2, 2010Jan 14, 2014Terydon, Inc.Method and apparatus for cleaning elongated tubes
US20110108278 *Apr 28, 2010May 12, 2011Katch Kan Holdings Ltd.Apparatus and method for stripping solids and fluids from a string used in drilling or servicing wells
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/81.1, 239/516
International ClassificationE21B19/00, E21B41/00, E21B21/00, E21B21/01
Cooperative ClassificationE21B19/00, E21B41/00, E21B21/01
European ClassificationE21B19/00, E21B41/00, E21B21/01