Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2635550 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1953
Filing dateOct 3, 1949
Priority dateOct 3, 1949
Publication numberUS 2635550 A, US 2635550A, US-A-2635550, US2635550 A, US2635550A
InventorsGranberg Albert J
Original AssigneeGranberg Albert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manually portable crankcase drain pump assembly
US 2635550 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1953 A. J. GRANBERG MANUALLY PORTABLE CRANKCASE DRAIN PUMP ASSEMBLY Filed 001;. 5, 1949 INVENTOR.

M M M m m B L w w m T T A 5 H Patented Apr. 21, 1953 MANUALLY PORTABLE KUA'SE' DRAIN PUMP AS SEMBLY Albert]. Granberg, akland,- Calif Application 0ctober '3, 1949;Sei'iaI No.-119,374

4 Claims.

My invention-relates to the draining of liquids from -.containers, tanks and the-like, and more particularly to a manually portable motor and pump assembly for draining the oil from the crankcases of I automobiles, boats or the like.

Heretofore itrhas been-the practice in changing the-oil in the crankcase-of automobiles, to run the auto over a pit or raise'the same upon :a rack, and then remove the drain plugtopermit the old oiltodrainoutfrom the crankcase, following which the plug must be replaced and the crankcase then refilled with fresh oil through the filler'pipe.

The present invention has for its :main purpose to completely eliminate the necessity for such time-consuming operations and provide manually portable means enabling anyone, without the necessity of utilizing pits or racks, to drain the oil from "such crankcase .witha minimum-of effort-and time. This is accomplished by providing a very light motor-pump assembly adapted for-manual portability and including a plurality ofselectable suction tubes of diiferentdiameters to fit-the dip stick-openings of the various makes of automobile engines. Each of these tubes is attachable to the inlet of the pump and whenso attachedand inserted into the crankcase through the dip stick opening, functions-as the suction line of the pump. The outlet end of thepump is-provided with a flexible hose for discharging the-pumpedoil into .a suitable drain or container.

For details of -my invention in itspreferred form, reference will be had to theaccompanying drawings wherein- Figure 1 is a view in section through a motor and pump assembly embodying the features of the present invention;

Figure 2 is an end viewofsuch assembly with an end plate removed to expose the structural arrangement of the pump; and

Figure 3 is a detail of the coupling between the suction line tube and the pump.

The invention as illustrated comprises an electric motor I, to the shaft of which is connected a pump 3 through a gear reduction train 5.

The motor is of light weight construction, having a rating of the order of horsepower, and is provided-with the necessary ventilating features such as afan 1' and vent openings 9. The front end of the motor casing is closed by a casting -l I which supports the front bearings l3 for the motor, and provides a housing-for the geartrain. Such casting is formed with a lateral extension l5 over themotor casing to constitute a suitable handle forcarrying the assembly.

The pump is mounted on-the front face of the casting'and includes a housinglllformed to provide a chamber l9 to receive-thepump rotor 2! mounted on the pump shaft 23 which extends through suitable bearings into the casting, where it carries the large gear 25 of the gear reduction '2 train, such gear-meshing with apinion 21 onthe front end of the motor shaft.

The :rotor axis :is disposed slightly dfi center with'respectte the axis of .thelchamber in which it lies. At angularly spaced distances about the rotor, the :rotor is formed with longitudinal recessesfwadapted 130162011 slidably receive a cylindrical roller 3|, preferably of *synthetic rubber. During Ioperation of the pump, centrifugal force will cause'these rollers to hug the inner surface of the rotor chamber and, due itothe'eccentric relationship between the axis of the rotor and the axis of the chamber, radial movement of the rollers will occur as the spacing between the rotor and the inner surface of the chamber varies. Movement of'the rotor will .cause a condition of reduced pressure at the inlet of the pump as the rollers move across the'intakeopening, thereby causing liquid to be taken into thepump from which the liquid will be'forced out of the pump as the-rollers approach and move acrossthe pump outlet.

In connection with the operation of the pump described-above, and moreparticularly with-reference to the compressionside of saidpump, it is very desirable to implement the centrifugal force, in keeping the rollers in pressure'engagement with the-surface of the chamber to maintain the pumplpressure at its maximum value. With this in mind, I provide a pressuregrooveBB-in the end wall of the chamber concentric with the circumference of therotor and adapted to communicate with the roller recesses as'they move along the groove. This groove begins'at approximately the start-of the pressure stroke and terminates in a-bend 35 establishingcommunication-with the outlet of the pump, whereby a roller approaching the landing on the pressure side of the pumpwill have its recess intercepted .by the groove and establish'communication with the outletof the pump. Thus the pressureexis-tingat the pump or volume behind the roller tends to .become smaller, the pressure therein will increase to a point whereit wil1-overcomethe back pressure of theliquid on the discharge sideof the, pump and causea momentary reversefiow and momentarily increase the pressure agains't'the'following roller.

As a roller, however, moves-beyond communication Withthis-pressure groove, and it begins .to approach the landing on the low pressure side of thepump; relative inward radial movement of the zrollerin'its associated recess becomes morepro- 'nounced, and the roller must'be" relieved of pressure which would necessarily develop in the liquid which would then be trapped in the recess. To afford such relief, I provide another groove 31 in the end wall of the chamber concentric with the circumference of the rotor and adapted to intercept the roller recesses as they travel in their circular orbit. This relief groove begins at a point in line with the outlet of the pump and terminates in a bend 39 establishing communication with the inlet of the pump. Thus as the roller recess breaks connection with the pressure groove, it will establish connection with the relief groove whereby any liquid behind the roller may be discharged to the inlet of the pump by way of the passage ofiered by the relief groove.

The inlet and outlet of the pump are both internally threaded. The inlet end receives the female part 4| of a bayonet type coupling 43 having a pair of diametrically disposed pins 45 extending from the face thereof, while in the passage through the same there is provided an O ring 47 of resilient material.

The male portion 49 of the coupling is attached to the upper end of a tube 5| and is provided with an interrupted flange 53 for establishing a bayonet connection with the pins on the aforementioned female part, with the male end in sealing engagement with the O ring.

With the tube thus coupled to the inlet of the pump, such tube will act as a suction line, and when inserted into the dip stick opening of a crankcase, the motor may be started to pump out the oil from such crankcase through the discharge or outlet of the pump. A flexible hose 55 or the like coupled to the outlet of the pump can be used to direct the discharged liquid into any suitable container or drain. A plurality of suction line tubes of different diameters are contemplated, to adapt the motor-pump assembly for use with different engines.

The motor-pump assembly is of relatively light weight and the provision of a handle enables the same to be carried about manually with ease, and accordingly greatly simplifies the use thereof in the draining of the crankcases of automobiles or boats without the necessity of resorting to the use of pits 0r racks and with great savings in time and labor. By disposing the handle in the plane of the inlet, the use of the equipment for its intended purpose is made that much easier for the operator.

After a crankcase has been drained in the manner indicated, the same may then be filled with fresh oil, utilizing the same equipment, but this time, pumping the oil from a drum or container into the crankcase.

It will become apparent from the above description of my invention in its preferred form, that the same fulfills the purposes for which the invention has been developed, and while I have described the preferred embodiment in considerable detail, I do not desire to be limited in my protection to the same, except as may be necessitated by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A manually portable drainer for draining an automobile crankcase or the like having a filler opening therein, comprising an electric motor having a shaft, a pump having a chamber with an inlet and an outlet connected thereto, and a rotor in said chamber having a shaft, means connecting said pump in driving connection to said motor to form a motor-pump assembly, said connecting means including a housing intermediate said pump and said motor and hav- 4 ing a handle lying in a plane substantially through said motor shaft and pump inlet, a gear train for said housing interconnecting said motor shaft and pump shaft, a bearing in said gear housing supporting the connected end of said motor shaft, a tube adapted to fit into such crankcase through such opening, and means for removably coupling said tube to said pump inlet.

2. A manually portable drainer for draining an automobile crankcase or the like through its filler opening, comprising an electric motor having an open-ended casing, including a bearing at one end for receiving and supporting one end of its rotor shaft, a gear housing closing the opposite end of said ,casing and having a bearing therein for receiving and supporting the other end of said rotor shaft, a handle integrally formed with said gear housing and extending laterally over said motor in a vertical plane substantially through the axis of said rotor shaft, a pump affixed to said gear housing and having a chamber with an inlet and an outlet connected to said chamber, a rotor disposed in said chamber, means connecting said pump rotor in driving connection to the shaft of said motor, said means involving a gear train in said gear housing and coupled at one end to said motor shaft and at its other end to said pump rotor, a tube adapted to fit into such crankcase through such filler opening, and means for removably coupling said tube to said pump inlet.

3. A gear drive and pump assembly for attachment to the open end of an electric motor casing, comprising a gear housing adapted at one end to close the open end of such motor casing and having an exposed bearing to receive and support the adjacent end of the rotor shaft of such motor, a pump mounted at the other end of said gear housing, and a gear train in said housing for drive connecting such rotor shaft to said pump, said pump having an inlet and an outlet, and a handle'extending from said assembly in a plane passing substantially through said pump inlet and the axis of said pump rotor.

4. A gear drive and pump assembly for attachment to the open end of an electric motor casing, comprising a gear housing adapted at one end to close the open end of said casing and having an exposed bearing to receive and support the adjacent end of the rotor shaft of such motor, a pump mounted at the other end of said gear housing, and a gear train in said housing for drive connecting such rotor shaft to said pump, said pump having an inlet and an outlet, and a handle extending from said gear housing in a plane passing substantially through said pump inlet and the axis of said pump rotor.

ALBERT J. GRANBERG.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 877,861 Radu Jan. 28, 1908 1,546,997 Reschke July 21, 1925 1,659,019 Collier Feb. 14, 1928 1,711,193 Wunderlich Apr. 30, 1929 1,749,058 Barlow Mar. 4, 1930 1,791,416 Lewis Feb. 3, 1931 1,815,221 Sweetland July 21, 1931 1,829,789 Dammeyer Nov. 3, 1931 1,955,169 Bentschinger Apr. 17, 1934 2,187,684 Fox et al Jan. 16, 1940 2,287,369 Anderson June 23, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US877861 *Jul 13, 1907Jan 28, 1908Paul C WildPortable tire-inflater.
US1546997 *Apr 26, 1924Jul 21, 1925Reschke William AMotor-driven portable oil-transfer pump
US1659019 *Mar 23, 1927Feb 14, 1928Standard Oil CoSystem for discharging lubricants from vehicle motors
US1711193 *Aug 20, 1927Apr 30, 1929Warren Refining And Chemical CDevice for transferring lubricants and the like
US1749058 *Feb 14, 1928Mar 4, 1930Lester P BarlowRotary pump
US1791416 *Jan 16, 1929Feb 3, 1931Gen ElectricLubricating device
US1815221 *Jun 2, 1924Jul 21, 1931Sweetland Ernest JMethod and apparatus for rapidly draining crank case oil
US1829789 *Dec 30, 1929Nov 3, 1931Dammeyer Edwin HGrease gun
US1955169 *Aug 5, 1931Apr 17, 1934Tide Water Oil CompanyApparatus for cleaning crank cases
US2187684 *Jan 21, 1938Jan 16, 1940Lincoln Eng CoLubricating apparatus
US2287369 *Jan 31, 1940Jun 23, 1942Anderson Swan FPump
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3380392 *May 12, 1966Apr 30, 1968Owatonna Tool CoLow-pressure roller pump
US3418939 *Jun 23, 1967Dec 31, 1968Kopp Jean ErnstRotary pumps
US3576379 *Jan 27, 1969Apr 27, 1971Parise James APortable low-pressure direct current pump
US4242064 *Jan 26, 1979Dec 30, 1980Moulton Developments LimitedRotary fluid pump with eccentrically moving pumping sleeve
US4987975 *Apr 17, 1990Jan 29, 1991Liu Chen CPortable automobile grease suction machine
US5044469 *Jul 12, 1990Sep 3, 1991Liu Chen CPortable automobile engine oil suction pump
US5257913 *Apr 5, 1991Nov 2, 1993Schwarzer Prazision Jurgen Schwarzer Gmbh & Co. KgHand tool for producing local over or under pressure
US6132178 *Mar 16, 1998Oct 17, 2000Carter; Lonnie G.Hand held pump device
US7967509Jun 15, 2007Jun 28, 2011S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Pouch with a valve
US8096329Jun 15, 2007Jan 17, 2012S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Hand-held vacuum pump
US8317494 *Feb 7, 2005Nov 27, 2012Carrier CorporationCompressor terminal plate
US20060039800 *Jan 3, 2005Feb 23, 2006Saunders Edward WHand-held pumping device
US20080131303 *Feb 7, 2005Jun 5, 2008Carrier CorporationCompressor Terminal Plate
DE3132537A1 *Aug 18, 1981Apr 8, 1982Stal Refrigeration Ab"anordnung an einem rotationskompressor zum antrieb des kompressorrotors"
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/234, 417/410.3, 184/1.5, 417/410.1
International ClassificationF04C11/00, F01C21/08, F01C21/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01C21/0863, F04C11/008
European ClassificationF01C21/08B2D2, F04C11/00D