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Publication numberUS2635730 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1953
Filing dateDec 23, 1949
Priority dateDec 23, 1949
Publication numberUS 2635730 A, US 2635730A, US-A-2635730, US2635730 A, US2635730A
InventorsSeckula Sr Joseph C
Original AssigneeSeckula Sr Joseph C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin separating and counting machine
US 2635730 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April'2l, 1953 J. c. SECKULA, sR

COIN SEPARATING AND COUNTJ ING MACHINE- 3 Sheets$heet 1 Filed Dec. 23, 1949 Inventor dbsepfi cf ea/326m an Alrorney April 21, 1953 J. c. SECKULA, SR

COIN SEPARATING AND COUNTING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 23, 1949 In w'nlor Attorney April 1953 J. c. SECKULA, SR 2,635,730

COIN SEPARATING AND COUNTING MACHINE Filed Dec. 23, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Attorney Patented Apr. 21 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE COIN SEPARATING AND COUNTING MACHINE Joseph C. Seckula, Sr., Newark, N. J.

Application December 23, 1949, Serial No. 134,730

Claims. 1

This invention relates to a novel construction of machine into which coins may be emptied en masse and of difierent denominations and which will function to separate the coins according to their denominations and to count the number of coins of each denomination separately for affording an accurate separation and counting of mixed coins such as pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters.

More particularly, it is an aim of the present invention to provide a counting machine capable of accomplishing the aforedescribed result yet which is of extremely simple construction enabling it to be economically manufactured and sold and readily serviced yet which is extremely efficient and durable for accomplishing its intended result with speed and accuracy.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide an improved feeding and selecting means by which mixed coins may be fed at substantially a uniform speed to the selector unit wherein the coins may be accurately separated according to denominations and which is so constructed that the possibility of coins overriding one another and being thereby prevented from being properly separated is substantially eliminated.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a coin separating and counting machine having electrically operated means actuated by the coins for separately counting the coins of each denomination passing through and being discharged from the machine and including associated electrically actuated stop means for positively preventing the coins of any denomination from being discharged ther than intermittently,

one by one to insure an accurate count of the coins.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a coin separating and counting machine having electrically actuated counting and speed control means for regulating the speed at which tional view thereof, partly in elevation, taken 2 substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 2-2 in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view, partly in side elevation taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 33 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional View, partly in plan, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 44 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view, partly in side elevation, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line 55 of Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary exploded plan view of a portion of the machine;

Figure 7 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line l-'! of Figure 1 and on an enlarged scale;

Figure 8 is an exploded fragmentary perspective view of a part of the coin selector;

Figure 9 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view partly in side elevation and on an enlarged scale, similar to Figure 5 and illustrating a modified form of the coin stop mechanism;

Figure 10 is a horizontal sectional view thereof taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line Ill-l0 of Figure 9, and

Figure 11 is a sectional view of the coin actuated switch, taken substantially along a plane as indicated by the line H-ll of Figure 10.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the coin selecting and counting machine in its entirety is designated generally I2 and includes a supporting frame, designated generally l3, which is composed of a base I l and an upstanding wall 15 which rises perpendicularly from the base 14. The base l4 may rest on any suitable supporting surface such as a table and, if desired, may be provided with legs, not shown, for supporting the base Hi in an elevated position relatively to a supporting surface. The wall l5 extends longitudinally of the base It and is disposed intermediate of its side edges, as illustrated in Figure 2 and is preferably provided intermediate of its ends with an upwardly projecting extension having an elongated opening therein and forming a handle [6 by which the machine 12 may be lifted and carried. The Wall l5 may be braced relatively to the base I4 adjacent one end thereof by webs or flanges ll and said wall I5 is provided above said webs IT with a supporting bracket it which is secured thereto by fastenings 19. The supporting bracket 18 projects obliquely-upwardly from the front side 20 of the wall I5.

A disk 2| is provided with a flanged periphery 22 a portion of which is secured by fastenings 23 to the upper, outer end of the bracket 13 and so that said disk 2| is disposed substantially at an oblique angle to the base i4 and also to the wall l5 and substantially at a right angle to the bracket IS. The flange 22 of the disc 2| eX- tends upwardly and forwardly therefrom so that said disk 2| is provided with an upwardly and forwardly facing recess 24 in the front side thereof. A conventional electric motor 25 is secured to the opposite, rear side of the disk 2| by fastenings 26 and has a driven shaft 2? which extends centrally through the disk 2| and is journaled therein. A table 28 is secured at its center to the driven shaft 21 and is disposed for rotation in the recess 24 of the disk 2| and is of a diameter slightly less than the internal diameter of the disk flange 22. The outer or forward side of the table 28- has an annular recessed surface 29 extending inwardly from the periphery thereof. A plurality, preferably eight pins or studs 30 are anchored in the table 28 and project perpendicularly from the recessed surface 29 and are disposed in equally spaced relationship circumferentially of said recessed surface 29. A plate 3| has an arouate bottom and inner flanged edge 32 which is suitably secured by fastenings 33 to the bottom half portion of the flange 22 and said plate 3| projects upwardly and outwardly with respect to the disk 2| and combines therewith to form an upwardly opening hopper 34 into which the coins to be separated and counted may be emptied en masse. As illustrated in Figure 1, the parts I8 to 34 are located adjacent one end of the upright wall I5.

The peripheral flange 22 above the plate 3| is provided with a gap 35 one end of which is defined by an outturned lip 33 of the flange 22 and the other end of which is defined by an upturned lip 31 of said flange. The gap 35 faces upwardly and generally toward the opposite end of the machine l2 and is provided to accommodate the entrance end of a runway, designated generally 38 forming a part of the coin separator, designated generally 39. Said runway 38, as best illustrated in Figures 4 and 8 includes a bottom' wall 40 and a side wall 4| which rises from and is disposed perpendicular to the bottom wall 40 and adjacent one longitudinal side edge thereof. The side wall 4| is disposed in substantially the same plane as the disk 2| and table 28 or at an oblique angle to the vertical wall I5 and the horizontal base I4 and the bottom 40 of the runway 38 is likewise disposed with its plane at an oblique angle to the wall l5 and base |4. As seen in Figures 1 and 3, the runway 38 is inclined downwardly from the end thereof which connects with the disk 2| to its opposite end. The wall 4| is provided with an undercut arouate portion 42 at one end thereof which is adapted to bear against a portion of the arouate edge of the recess 35 of the disk 2| and so that said wall 4| is disposed in substantially the same plane as the recessed table surface 29. A portion of the bottom wall 40 rests upon the lip 36 and is detach-ably secured thereto by fastenings 43 and so that the upper end of said bottom wall 4!] will extend into the disk recess 24 and substantially across a portion of the recessed surface 29 of the table 28. The terminal portion of the upper end of the bottom wall 4|! is beveled as seen at 44 so as to be disposed substantially concentric to the inner annular wall defining the recess 29, as best seen in Figure 3. When the 4 runway 38 is thus secured to the disk 2| the upper end of the side wall 4| thereof will abut against the upper lip 37. The edge portion of the bottom wall 49 which is disposed in the recess 29 and which is spaced slightly from the surface thereof to afford clearance is provided with a notch 45 through which the pins 36 pass when the table 28 is revolved. A gauge block 43 forms a part of the runway 38 and is secured thereto adjacent the upper end of said runway and includes a bottom surface 4'! which rests upon the upper surface 'of the bottom wall 40. The gauge block 46 is provided at its top with an inwardly extending flange 48 which bears against the side wall 4|, adjacent the upper edge thereof and fastenings 49 extend through the upper portion of the gauge block 46 through the flange 48 for securing said block to the side wall 4|. The inner side wall 53 of the gauge block 46 is spaced by the flange 48 from the side wall 4| to afford clearance therebetween for the passage of coins 5| from the table 28 onto the runway 38 and so that the coins in entering the runway between the gauge block 45 and side wall 4| will be disposed to roll on the bottom wall 40 and lie against the side wall 4!. The top wall 5|a of the gauge block 43 is concave and slopes away from the flange 48 and extends into the disk recess 24 so that coins 5| before being released by the pins 35 as will hereinafter be described, to roll into the runway 38 will move into positions so that portions thereof are disposed between the recessed table surface 29 and the gauge block 43 to insure that the coins will be disposed substantially in the same plane as the table 28 and side wall 4| when admitted to the runway 38.

The wall 4|, adjacent the gauge block 46, is provided with an elongated opening 52 which extends longitudinally of the wall 4| and which is formed by a portion 53 which is struck out from the wall 4| and which is inclined away from its upper surface, as best illustrated in Figure 8. The bottom wall 40 is provided with a portion 54 which extends between the upper or front surface of the wall 4| and the surface of its angular wall portion 53. The upper end of a chute 55,merges with the free end of the wall portion 53 and the bottom wall portion 54. Said chute 55 is arouate in shape at its upper end as seen at 53 and extends downwardly from the runway 38 and has an open lower end 51 which opens above the base l4 and in front of the wall l5. Beyond or below the first coin selecting opening 52, the wall 4| is provided with a second similar coin selecting opening 58 having a wall portion 59 associated therewith and corresponding to the wall portion 33 and a bottom portion 3E3 corresponding to the bottom portion 54. The portions 59 and 33. likewise merge with a second chute 3| which substantially corresponds with the first chute 55. Beyond and below the second coin selecting opening 58 is a third similar coin selecting opening 32 which likewise has associated therewith a side wall portion '33, corresponding to the portion 53 and a bottom wall portion 64 corresponding to the bottom wall portion 54, as best illustrated in Figure 4. A third chute has an upper end merging with the wall portions 63 and 64 and which extends downwardly from the runway 38 and substantially corresponds to the chutes 55 and 3|. The portion of the wall 4| above the coin selecting openings 52, 58 and 62 forms a coin supporting rail 66,. as illustrated in Figures 1, 3 and 8. The coin selecting opening 58 extends to a height above that of the opening 52 and the opening '62 extends to a height above that of theopening 58. Beyond the opening 62, the walls 48 and M of the coin selector runway 38 merge integrally with the arcuate upper end of a fourth chute 61.

Each of the coin chutes is provided with a coin actuated switch, designated generally 68 and a description of one of said switches will suffice for all. The switch 68 of each coin chute, as illustrated in Figures 5, 9 and 11 is of a conventional construction, relatively small in size and extremely sensitive and which i commercially known as a microswitch. The housing of the switch 68 is suitably secured to the back side of its associated chute, as for example the chute 55 as seen in Figure and is provided with a shaft 69 which is journaled in the housing and which has an exposed end in which is connected one end of a strand of wire I8. An intermediate portion of the strand I8 extends obliquely through openings II and 12 in the front and rear walls, respectively, of the chute and across the coin passage I3 thereof so that a coin 5| passing by gravity down through the passage 13 strikes a downwardly inclined oblique portion of the strand 18 before reaching the discharge end 51 of the chute and the weight of the coin will swing the strand I8 and turn the shaft 69 counterclockwise for the normal circuit interrupting position of Figure 5 of said parts to the circuit closing position as illustrated in full lines in Figure 9 and in which latter position, the strand I8 clears the passage I3 to allow the coin 5| to pass and be discharged from the outlet 51. As seen in Figure 11, a non-conducting electrical member 18a which fulcrums at I4 on one switch contact I5 within the housing of the switch 68 is rocked by engagement with a lever member 16 which is fixed to the shaft 69 by this movement of the shaft and the strand 18 for causing a spring member I1 which engages the member 13a and the contact 15 to move to the right of Figure 11 by a snap action and into engagement with the lip I8 of the other contact I9 of the switch 68. When the coin 5| clears the strand 18, the spring TI returns the parts to their positions of Figure 11 displacing the lower end of the spring conductor member IT to the left and out of engagement with the contact I9. This closing and re-openin of the switch 68 is practically instantaneous. A conventional electric solenoid 88 is mounted by means of a bracket 8I on the front part of each chute above the switch 68. A lever 82 including a depending arm 83 and a substantially horizontal arm 84 is pivotally mounted at its apex on a portion of the bracket 8| and below the solenoid 88. The arm 84 carries on its upper side the core 85 of the solenoid 88 which is attracted by the solenoid when energized for rocking the lever 82 counterclockwise as seen in Figure 5. The arm 83, terminates at its lower end in a sleeve 86 which is disposed substantially perpendicular to the chute and through which a. pin 81 slidably extends and which has a head at its outer end. The pin 81 carries an adjustable stop 88 which is spaced inwardly from the sleeve 86 and which seats one end of an expansion spring 89, the opposite end of which bears against said sleeve for urging the pin 81 inwardly and toward the associated chute. The pin 81 extends loosely into an opening 98 in the front wall of the chute but normally does not extend into the chute passage I3. A positive conductor SI and a negative conductor 92 leading 6. from a suitable source of electric current, such as a conventional outlet, not shown, of 110 volts connected with the switch contacts 15 and 19, respectively and said conductors 9| and 92 have portions which connect with the two posts of the solenoid 8, designated 93 and 94 and the two posts 95 and 96 of an electric counter 91. It will be readily apparent that the switch 68 and solenoid 88 of each ofthe other chutes has a similar electric circuit to that as illustrated in Figure 5 and in each of which electric circuits is also interposed an electric counter corresponding to the counter 91. All of said circuits may be connected to the same outlet and the electric motor 25 may likewise be connected to the same outlet. If desired, an electric switch, not shown, may be interposed in the circuit so that the circuit to each switch 68 and to the motor 25 may be simultaneously energized or de-energized.

' In lieu of the solenoid arrangement as illustrated in Figure 5, a solenoid 98, as illustrated i Figure 9 may be provided and which is supported by a bracket 99 likewise in front of its chute. With the arrangement of Figure 9, the solenoid core I88 comprises a bar which is disposed between the solenoid 98 and the front wall of the associated chute, as seen in Figure 10 and which is supported at its ends on corresponding ends of two rods I8I which extend reciprocally through the chute adjacent its side edges and which do not extend through the chute coin passage 13. A crosshead I82 is secured to the opposite ends of the rods I8I behind the chute and has a stop pin I83 extending reciprocally through its intermediate portion. The inner end of the stop pin I83 extends loosely into an opening I04 in the rear wall of the chute and said pin carries an adjustable stop I which is disposed between the chute and crosshead I82. A spring I86 is mounted on the stop pin I83 between the stop I5 and crosshead I82 and said pin carries an adjusting nut I91 which is adjustable thereon and adapted to bear against the outer side of the crosshead I82.

The four electric counters 91 are supported on the wall I5 by a bracket I88.

Assuming that the machine I2 is connected to a, suitable electric source of current or outlet, the circuits to the four solenoids 88 and the four counters 9! will normally be de-energized by the switches 68 in their positions of Figure 5 but the motor 25 will be energized for revolving the table 28. Assuming that a relatively low speed motor is used having, for example, a 40 R. P. M., the table 28 will be revolved forty revolutions per minute and as will hereinafter become apparent the machine will then function to separate and count six hundred and forty coins of different denominations per minute. The machine I2 is shown as equipped with four chutes for counting pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters but could obviously be provided with a fifth chute and associated parts for additionally counting half dollars, if desired. Coins to be counted of the four denominations are emptied into the hopper 34 and the revolving table 28 will cause two of the coins to be picked up in the space of the recessed surface 29 between each two adjacent pins 38 so that sixteen coins will be carried upwardly and discharged into the runway 38 at each revolution of the table 28. The table 28 revolves counterclockwise as seen in Figure 3 and .as each pin 38 thereof enters the slot 45 the two coins 5I disposed therebehind are released and propelled by the next trailing pin '38 into the runaeemso ,7 Way 38 between the gauge block 46 and wall 4| so that the coins roll on the bottom wall 40 and lie at an incline against the wall 4|, as best illustrated in Figure 7. The first coin selector opening 52 is of a height to allow dimes to roll therethrough and the dimes will thereby be separated from the other coins at this station and will follow the wall 53 and will roll on the bottom surface 54 into the first or dime chute 55 while the nickels, pennies and quarters which are of a larger diameter will pass over the first opening 52 by engagement with the rail 66 above said opening. At the second station, the pennies will enter the opening 58 following the wall portion 59. and rolling on the bottom wall portion 60 into the second chute 6! while the nickels and quarters will engage the rail 65 above the opening 58 and will thus be prevented from entering this second station. The nickels will then enter the third station through its opening 62 and will be similarly directed by the wall portion 63 and bottom portion 64 into the third chute 65 while the quarters will similarly ride the rail 66 above the opening 62 and accordingly will roll on into the last chute Bl. It will thus be readily apparent that the coins will roll one behind the other along the runway 38 to be segregated by the selector 39, as just previously described, and will be prevented from overlapping one another in their movement along the runway by the restrict ed entrance opening offorded by the gauge block 45. Furthermore, a slight intermittent feeding of the coins is provided by the coins being fed two at a time and with a slight spacing between each two coins produced by the pins 36. The

first coin in each chute will strike the blade or strand of the switch 58 thereof for momentarily closing said switch to cause the associated counter 97 to record the passage of the coin through the chute and this closing of the switch will also energize the solenoid to project the stop pin 81 into the passage 13 of the chute to catch the following coin usually as illustrated in Figure 5 by gripping engagement therewith. The spring 89 allows the stop pin 8'! to yield relatively to the sleeve 86 so that the pin will engage the coin with suflicient force to hold it in the passage 13 yet will prevent the stop pin from banging too forcibly against the coin when the solenoid is energized. The switches t8 and solenoids 80 or 98 are capable of functioning with wildcient rapidity so that the machine l2 may accurately count coins all of one denomination at the normal rate of operation of the machine, for example, six hundred and forty coins per minute. The solenoids 98 will function in substantially the same manner as the solenoids 80 except that the armature will reciprocate toward and away from the solenoid field rather than oscillating relatively thereto as in Figure 5.

The coins may be discharged from the lower outlet end of the chute into a tray Hill which rests upon the base l4 and which has a separate compartment for coins of each denomination or the lower ends of the chutes may be connected to bags or other suitable receptacles, not shown, into which the coins may be discharged after being separated and counted.

It will be readily apparent that a defective or damaged switch or solenoid may be readily removed and replaced and as the counting machine [2 has few other working parts, it will be obvious that a minimum of maintenance will be necessary. Obviously, the specific types of switch 68. and solenoids W- and' 96 which have been illustrated and each of which is of a conventional construction are not the only types of switches and solenoids which may be employed and other switches possessing a sufficient degree of sensitivity and other solenoids may be utilized. Various other modifications and changes are likewise contemplated and may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as hereinafter defined by the appended claims.

I claim as'my invention:

1. A coin counting mechanism comprising a downwardly extending chute through which coins are adapted to pass by gravity, means for supporting said chute, a normally open switch mounted on said chute having a spring biased actuating blade normally extending across the passage of the chute and adapted to be actuated by a coin passing downwardly through the chute for displacing the actuating blade out of the chute to move the switch to a circuit closing position, an electrically actuated coin counter connected to said switch and actuated by the closing of the switch for counting each coin passing through the chute, an electrically actuated stop unit mount-ed on said chute above the switch and electrically connected to said switch, said stop unit including an element movable into and out of engagement with the chute passage above the switch blade and actuated solely by the closing of said electric switch for movement into said chute passage above the coin which is in engagement with the actuating blade for stopping down- Ward movement of coins through the chute and which are disposed above the coin which moved the actuating blade to a circuit closing position, the actuating blade portion which is in engagement with the first mentioned coin when the switch is moved to a circuit closing position being spaced from the stop element a distance greater than the diameter of the coin and less than twice the diameter thereof.

2. A coin counting mechanism comprising a downwardly extending chute defining a coin passage through which coins are adapted to pass by gravity, said chute being flat in cross section and having opposite adjaccntly disposed walls adapted to face opposite flat surfaces oi a coin passing through the chute, said walls having aligned elongated openings extending longitudinally of the chute and disposed intermediate of its side edges, a normally open electric switch mounted on the chute having a spring biased actuating blade extending downwardly at an oblique angle from the switch through said. aligned openings and across the coin passage of the chute, when the switch is in an open position, said actuating blade being adapted to be initiall engaged by the leading edge portion of a coin passing downwardly through the passage and being displaced thereby out of the chute-passage to move the switch to a circuit closing position, a portion of the actuating blade, disposed remote to the switch, engaging a side of the coin until the coin has assed downwardly to'below the level of said blade portion and being retained thereby out of engagement with the chute passage to retain the switch in a circuit closing position until the coin has moved to a position below the actuating blade, an electrically actuated coin counter connected, to said switch and actuated by the closing of the switch for counting each coin passing through the coin passage, and. an electrically actuated stop unit mounted on said chute above the switch and incloning an element movable intoand out of engagement with the chute passage above and spaced from said elongated openings of the chute passage, said stop unit element being actuated solely by the closing of the electric switch for movement into the chute passage above the coin which is in engagement with the actuating blade for stopping downward movement of coins through the coin passage and which are disposed above the coin which is in engagement with the actuating blade, the actuating blade portion which is in engagement with the first mentioned coin when the switch is moved to a circuit closing position being spaced from the stop element a distance greater than the diameter of the coin and less than twice the diameter thereof.

3. A coin counting mechanism as in claim 2, said switch blade comprising a substantially rigid wire strand having a turned back free end forming a rounded part defining the portion of the blade which is disposed remote to the switch and engages the side of the coin.

4. A coin counting mechanism as in claim 2, said stop unit including a lever having an end swingably urged toward the chute by energizing of the stop unit, said stop element being slidably supported in and extending through said lever end, spring means urging the stop element toward the chute, and an abutment member retaining the stip element out of engagement with the chute when the stop unit is de-energized, said spring means cushioning the impact of the stop element against a coin contained in the chute when the stop element is projected into the chute by the stop unit being energized, and said spring means additionally functioning to yieldably retain the stop element against the last mentioned coin while the stop unit remains energized.

5. A coin counting mechanism as in claim 2, said stop unit including a carrier slidably mount- 10 ed on the chute outwardly of the chute coin passage, means mounting the stop element on the carrier for limiting sliding movement relatively thereto toward and away from the coin passage, spring means biasing the stop element toward the coin passage, said stop element being maintained out of engagement with the coin passage by said carrier when the stop unit is de-energized and being displaceable into the coin passage by movement of the carrier when the stop unit is energized, said spring means cushioning the impact of the stop element against a coin contained in the chute when the stop element is projected into the chute, and said spring means additionally functioning to yieldably retain the stop element against the last mentioned coin while the stop unit remains energized.

JOSEPH C. SECKULA, SR.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 698,972 Laing Apr. 29, 1902 748,934 Doldt Jan. 5, 1904 975,458 Rees Nov. 15, 1910 1,249,141 Litchfield Dec. 4, 1917 1,378,720 Roeling May 17, 1921 1,8 9,701 Downey Aug. 18, 1931 2,078,429 Tweedale Apr. 27, 1937 2,106,042 Stark Jan. 18, 1938 2,122,550 Adrian July 5, 1938 2,249,236 Tratsch July 15, 1941 2,567,900 Winkler Sept. 11, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 11,062 Denmark July 13, 1908 29,194 Sweden Dec. 10, 1907 276,015 Great Britain Nov. 24, 1927

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2835260 *Feb 11, 1954May 20, 1958Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin sorting and counting machine
US3002601 *Apr 19, 1960Oct 3, 1961Eugen ReisCoin sorting and counting machine
US3009555 *Mar 25, 1959Nov 21, 1961Seckula Sr Joseph CCoin sorter and counter
US3026982 *Feb 18, 1957Mar 27, 1962Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin sorter
US3032162 *Nov 21, 1958May 1, 1962Alvin E HuckinsSeparating and counting machine
US3040858 *Jul 6, 1959Jun 26, 1962 Apparatus for counting and sorting coins
US3351075 *Apr 12, 1966Nov 7, 1967Standardwerk Eugen Reis G M BCoin-sorting and counting machine
US3422824 *Oct 12, 1967Jan 21, 1969Scan Coin AbCoin feeding device
US3771538 *Jul 26, 1971Nov 13, 1973Reis KCoin sorting and counting machines
US3948280 *Mar 28, 1975Apr 6, 1976Scan Coin AbCoin lifting device having a flexible rotor disc
US3994309 *Dec 13, 1974Nov 30, 1976Data Support Pty. Ltd.Coin separator
US5516293 *Apr 7, 1994May 14, 1996Bally Gaming International, Inc.Gaming machine coin hopper coin sensor
US6758736 *Jun 12, 2002Jul 6, 2004Victor G. RistvedtCoin or token sorting apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/303, 453/58
International ClassificationG07D3/04, G07D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/04
European ClassificationG07D3/04