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Publication numberUS2638089 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1953
Filing dateJan 13, 1950
Priority dateJan 13, 1950
Publication numberUS 2638089 A, US 2638089A, US-A-2638089, US2638089 A, US2638089A
InventorsMurphy Charles E M
Original AssigneeMurphy Charles E M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot exerciser
US 2638089 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1953 c. E. M. MURPHY FooT EXERCISER Filed Jan. 15. 1950 urp/ay. m

INVENTOR.

CkarlesE. M M

ATTORNEY Patented May 12, 1953 I. :':f` ii Nr optics 2-f FOOT. EXERCISER@ charles-E. M. Murphy, eeuwse, 1N. Y. Application January 13, 1950, Serial No. 138,449

My invention relates to an exercising.device and more particularly to-a foot and-leg exerciser. Heretofore'it has-been proposed to provide foot exercisers vhaving a rotatable roller constructed and arranged to be rotated by movement of the `users foot thereover. It has valso been suggested to 'use a single roller or plurality of rollers,'rotat ably mounted upon a suitable support, whereby the footv may be exercised and massaged by mov 4ing the foot transversely of the rollers or between the lsurfaces `of successive rollers.

While the above referred to types of i'oot exercising and/or massaging devices no doubt `function for their intended purposes, `they are open to certain objections which are inherent "in their basic design and construction. Exer- "cisers comprising a single roller designed for free rolling movement on the floor 'are objectionable for the reason that, in use of the device. it is diiiicult to maintain a fixed path of rolling `movement, and there is also a tendency for `the roller .to slip from beneath the foot of the user, particularly at the extreme limits of travel of the roller across the oor. In exercising devices of -the character wherein a plurality of rollers are rotatably mounted upon a base or other support, the rollers are restrained against outward movement fromv beneath theusers foot; however, exercising movement with'respect to an individual roller is coniined to la rather limited path. in

other Words, since the axes of the rollers are 'positioned in the "supporting base insubstan- "tially fixed planes, the change in angularity of the f oot and the leg of the user isrestricted during forward and backward movement of the foot across the peripheral Vsurface of the roller.

After considerable 'research and experimentation, I have found that improved results can be 'obtained by constructing and arranging the roller and its supporting basewhereby the height uof the roller and its effective distance from the user may be simultaneouly varied. There are many advantages which accrue by reason of such design. 'For example, it will be readily appre- `elated that provision for adjustment of the roller, "as" above mentioned, permits a Wide range of change of angularity of the foot and of the leg `during the exercising operation, which is particularly beneficial to the muscles of these mem*- bers. In some instances, the need for exercise of the leg muscles is predominately indicatedin which case vthe device can be quickly and easily adjusted to a position to afford variable flexing desired. By means o: my improved arrange-- 7`Claims. (Cl. 12S-57) 'and/or stretching' of the muscles oi theleg, as

of exerciser.

ment, economies in manufacture are effected, `not possible `with devices involving a plurality-of rollers, since la single roller adjustable as' to height from the base support and in veffective distance from the user, eliminates the necessity of having a number of rollers mounted Lat `specifically different heights from the base.

An object of my invention is to provide an improved foot and 'legexercisen Another object of my invention is to provide an improved exerciser adaptedffor massaging AAthe foot, and exercising the foot and leg muscles.'-

Yet another object of my invention is to provide an improved exerciser, including a rotatable element, constructed and arranged whereby the height of said element With respect `to its support may be quickly and easily adjusted. Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved exerciser having a rotatable element adapted to be positioned atA spaced in tervals on its support, through an arc of substantially whereby the height of the element above the base of its support is varied.

Yet still another object of my inventionisto `provide an improved exerciser, including a revolvable element, having means whereby there'- sistance `to rotation of the rotatable elementmay be varied.

A further object 'of my invention is to provide an improved foot and leg exerciser constructed and arranged whereby the height ofthe rotatable element and its eiiective distance from theuser may be simultaneously varied.

A still further object of my invention `is vto provide an improved exerciser, that is strong 'and sturdy in construction, consisting of but few parts, and not liable to get out of order even after long and continued use.

The lalcove and other desirable 'features .of novelty and advantage of the present invention will be more clearly understood by1reference to the attached drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective View device of the presentl invention:

Fig. 2 is a 4sectional view along line zie-1 of Fig. 1; `and Fig. 3 isa perspective view of a of the' exercising modified form Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Fig. 1, rthe exerciser comprises a base structure designated generally by numeral l', a pair oi` arcuate shaped roller supportmembers I, and a foot'engaging roller 3. The base includes the operators foot. l 4an oscillatory rotary motion to the roller by movfoot members II, which may be formed integral with members 2, and end pieces 5, secured to said members by means of screws 6 or other suitable fastening means. It will be noted that each foot spectively. and a bottom wall I2 (Fig. 2). As will be seen in Fig. 1, the lower wall Il of the slot is v formed with a plurality of recesses I3, at spaced intervals of its peripheral portion, to provide seats for the end :portions of the shaft of the roller 3, as will be described more fully hereinafter.

Reference being had to Figs. l and 2, the roller'.

3, which is preferably formed from rubber or other resilient material, comprises'a central foot engaging portion I4 terminating in conical Ashaped flared ends l I5, and a metal shaft IIS, to `which the rubberv body of the roller is secured, as

by vulcanizring. It will be observedythat the shaft I6 isof length approximately equal to the horizontal distance between the bottom walls I2 of .the slots 8, and that theend portions II of the shaft seat in opposite recesses I3 of the slot.

The roller is adapted to be rotated by moving a foot across the central portion III, and in order to increase the frictional contact between the foot and the roller, the surface of its foot engaging portion is formed with undulations I8.

` The roller is normally freely rotatable when the end portions of the shaft are seated in opposite recess; however, its rotative resistance may be varied by means of a brake device comprising a .bre pin or block I9, positioned in an aperture 23,

formed in an arm 2| of a bifurcated member 22. The lower end of lthe pin is adapted for bearing ,engagement with portion 23 of the shaft, the degree of pressure between the bearing surfaces ,being controlled by means of an adjustable setscrew 24, threadable into the aperture above the pin. In connection with the construction of the bifurcated member 22, it will be noted that arm 2I Ithereof over-hangs the outer face of member .,2, and accordingly, the member is embraced by the arms 2l and 2I. By reason of this arrangearcuate path determined by the curvature of members 2. In other words, when it is desired to vmove the roller from seated `position in one pair vof recesses to another pair, the end portions of the shaft are brought into registry with the slot ,8, and the roller is then pushed in the direction of the ypair of slotsin which it is 1to rotate, movement ofthe shaft from` the normal horizontal vposition beingprevented by thearms 2E and 2|.

In using the exerciser, it is placed on the floor Awith one end facing the operator, who is seated in a chair, located so that the roller, when in the position shown in Fig. 1, is within easy reach of The operator then imparts ing the foot backwards and forwards across the central foot engaging portion. In the first position of the roller, it is contemplated that very llittle stretching of the leg muscleslwill be required, to impart oscillatory movement, as above described. After a period of exercising in the first position, the roller is then moved to the next set of recesses vwhere the exercising is continued, and so on, until the roller reaches the `4 limit of its travel along the support members 2. In each successive position of the roller, assuming that the distance between the operator and the front end of the exerciser remains substantially constant, the leg must be extended to obtain rotative contact between the foot and the roller. The rotative resistance of the roller may be quickly and easily varied as desired, at any exercising stage, by manipulating the set-screw associated with the brake device. f

With reference to the arcuate shaped roller support members, it will be noted that when the roller is moved from one pair of recesses to the next adjacent pair, the height of the roller above the plane of the base structure, and its distance 'from the center of the base are simultaneously varied. By means of this construction desired exercising of the leg muscles is obtained, for the ment, movement of the roller is restrained to the reason that different operative positions of the roller require lthat the operator raise or lower 1the leg, and simultaneously extend or. retract the same, depending upon the direction in' which the roller is being moved along the slot, in orderto vimpart an oscillatory rotary movement to the roller.

Concerning the construction of the exerciser, it

is preferably formed from metal or a metal. alloy,

however; it may be made of wood or other suit'- `able material. In order to retain the exerciser in desired operative position, that is, to prevent it from sliding awayl from the operator Vwhen the rotative resistance of Ithe roller is increased, the

end of the exerciser may be placed against a suitable support, and to provide additional' frictional contact with the oor, the feet may. be provided with rubber gripping surfaces, not shown. In

-.connection with the design of the recesses, in which the end :portions of the roller seat, i-t will be noted that they are angularly disposed with ,respect to the lower wall of the slot, in a fashion .calcula-ted to permit easy seating or removal of Athe shaft from any set of recesses.

Referring to Fig. 3, there is showna modified Vform of exerciser, comprising a base structure 25,

a pair of similar arcuater shapedroller support members 26, and a foot engaging roller 21. The ybase includes end pieces 28, side pieces 29 and 4foot members 3D. Each of the roller supports 2e lis formed with a plurality of recesses 3l, providing seats for the end portions of the roller shaft I6', said end portions being retainedfin seated vposition by means of springs 32 attached to`links -33 and 34. `The links 33 are pivotally mounted on members 26 by means of pins 35, or other lsuitable fastening means positioned on the vertical center lines of the members, and links 35 are apertured to receive the ends of the roller shaft, as shown. Rotative resistance of the foot engaging roller may be varied by means of a thumb nut 3B, threadable on the end of the roller shaft.

The modified exerciser is operated in substan- :tially the same fashion as is the preferred form of Fig. l. When it is desired to shift the position of the roller 21 from one set of opposite recesses to the next adjacent pair, the roller is lifted from seated position, either manually or by using' the toes, and pushing the roller along the upper edges lof members 2B, until the end portions of the shaft drop into the recesses. In each of the above described-embodiments of the present invention, the

recesses adapted to receive the roller shaft, are 'spaced at intervals of approximately 30 ofthe arcuate members.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, I wish it to beunderaesaose stood that I do not conne myself to the precise details of construction herein set forth by way of illustration, as it is apparent that many changes and variations may be made therein, by those skilled in the art, Without departing from the spirit of the invention, or exceeding the scope ci the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An exerciser of the character described, comprising a base structure, a pair of spaced parallel coaxial roller support members secured to the base, a foot engaging roller, including a shaft having free end portions, and means associated with said support members adapted for selective` engagement with the free end portions of the` roller shaft, whereby to vary the height of, the roller vertically of the pla-ne of the base, and means associated with the roller to vary its rotative resistance.

2. An exerciser of the character described, cornprising a base structure, a pair of coaxial arcuate shaped roller supported members secured to opiposite sides of the base, each of said members having a plurality of recesses formed therein at spaced intervals in the vicinity of its arcuate pem ripheral position, a foot engaging roller, and means associated with the roller adapted to be selectively seated in opposite recesses of said supports, whereby to vary the height of the roller vertically of the plane of the base, and means associated with the roller to vary its rotative reels-tf ance.

3. An exerciser of the character described, com prising a base structure, a pair of similar coaxial arcuate shaped roller support members secured to opposite sides of the base, each of said support members having a plurality of recesses formed therein at spaced intervals in the vicinity of its arcuate peripheral portion, a foot engaging roller, including a shaft having free end portions, the free end portions of the .shaft being adapted to be selectively seated in opposite peripheral recesses of the supports, whereby to vary the height of the roller vertically of the base, and means associated with the roller to vary its rotative resistance.

4. An exerciser of the character described, come prising a base, a pair of similar coaxial arcuate shaped roller support v-rnembers attached to opposite sides of the base, each of said members having a slot formed in the vicinity of its peripheral portion, said slot having a plurality of recesses formed in one wall at spaced intervals thereof, and a foot engaging roller, including a shaft having free end portions, the free end portions of the shaft being adapted to be selectively seated in opposite recesses of the slots, whereby to simultaneously vary the height of the roller vertically of the base and its distance horizontally lengthwise from the center o1" the base.

5. An exerciser of the character described, comprising a base, a pair of similar coaxial arcuate shaped roller support members attached to opposite sides of the base, each of said members having a slot formed in the vicinity of its peripheral portion, said slot having a plurality of recesses formed in one wall at spaced intervals thereof, a foot engaging roller, including a shaft having free ends, said roller having an undulating resilient contact surface, the free ends of the shaft being adapted to be selectively seated in opposite recesses of the slots, whereby to simultaneously vary the height of the roller, vertically of the bas-e and its distance horizontally lengthwise from the center of the base, and means to vary the rotative resistance of the roller.

6. An exerciser of the character described, comprising a base, a pair of similar coaxial arcuate shaped roll-er support members attached to opposite sides of the base, each of said support members having a plurality of recesses formed therein at intervals of 30 along the peripheral arcuate portion, a roller, including a shaft having free end portions, the free end `portions of the shaft being adapted to be selectively seated in opposite peripheral recesses of the supports, whereby to simultaneously vary the height of the roller `vertically of the base and its distance horizontally from the center of the base, means to urge the end portions of the roller shaft into seated engagement with the recesses, and means associated with the roller to vary its rotative resistance.

7. An exerciser of the character described, comprising a base, a pair of similar coaxial arcuate shaped roller support members attached to opposite sides of the base, each of said. support members having a plurality of recesses formed therein at intervals of 30 in the vicinity of the peripheral arcuate portion, a foot engaging roller, said roller having an undulating resilient contact surface, means associated with the roller adapted to be selectively seated in opposite recesses of the supports, whereby to vary the height of the roller vertically of the plane of the base, and means to vary the rotative resistance of the roller.

CHARLES E. M. MURPHY.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,978,244 Bach l- Oct. 23, 1934 2,006,350 Gartner July 2, 1935 2,037,495 Brogan Apr. 14, 1936 2,266,859 Grampp Dec. 23, 1941 2,285,953 Wheelock June 9, 1942 FOREGN PATENTS Number Country Date 415,673 Great Britain Aug. 30, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1978244 *Oct 13, 1932Oct 23, 1934Simpson Bach JamesFoot adjuster and exerciser
US2006350 *Dec 14, 1933Jul 2, 1935Simon Gartner HenryFoot exerciser
US2037495 *Dec 1, 1934Apr 14, 1936Brogan James AFoot massaging device
US2266859 *Jun 1, 1940Dec 23, 1941Grampp AlbertToe and foot vibrator
US2285958 *Aug 28, 1939Jun 9, 1942Wheelock Edwin MMeans for massaging the feet
GB415673A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3421760 *Nov 23, 1965Jan 14, 1969Habern W Freeman JrExerciser device
US4010743 *Mar 30, 1976Mar 8, 1977Ron FitzsimonsFoot massager
US4539977 *Feb 23, 1983Sep 10, 1985Schneider Sr Paul ETherapeutic support means
US4660548 *Apr 30, 1985Apr 28, 1987Metronic Electronic GmbhMassage apparatus
US5074549 *Aug 13, 1990Dec 24, 1991Harvey Clyde LKnee exercise device
US5676638 *Dec 8, 1994Oct 14, 1997Shefi; AmosStrap-mounted massaging device
US6146343 *Jun 19, 1998Nov 14, 2000Stewart; Roger K.Ball massage device
US7189210 *Jul 11, 2005Mar 13, 2007Tiffany HillmanFoot massaging method and device
US7300026 *Mar 11, 2002Nov 27, 2007Zsolt PapErgonomic and massaging computer interface support surfaces
US8801579Aug 2, 2012Aug 12, 2014Dynamic Sports Products, LLCMuscle stretching and massaging apparatus
US9011356 *Sep 4, 2009Apr 21, 2015Paul J. McCloreyMultiple position foot massaging device
US20080154162 *Dec 17, 2007Jun 26, 2008L'orealDevice for massaging the skin
US20100063429 *Sep 4, 2009Mar 11, 2010Mcclorey Paul JMultiple position foot massaging device
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/27, 601/118
International ClassificationA63B23/04, A61H15/00, A63B23/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63B23/10, A61H15/00
European ClassificationA61H15/00, A63B23/10