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Publication numberUS2639191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1953
Filing dateApr 10, 1950
Priority dateApr 10, 1950
Publication numberUS 2639191 A, US 2639191A, US-A-2639191, US2639191 A, US2639191A
InventorsJr John O Hruby
Original AssigneeJr John O Hruby
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sprinkler head and nozzle
US 2639191 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. O. HRUBY, JR

SPRINKLER HEAD AND NOZZLE May 19, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 10. 1950 Atorney INVENTOR JOHN O. HRUBYJR.y

Www/WMM May 19, 1953 J. o. HRUBY, JR

sPRINxLER HEAD AND NozzLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 10, 1950 JOHN O. HRUBY JR. BY @MAQ/WMM Attorney Patented May 19, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SPRINKLR HEAD AND J ohn O. Hruby, Jr., Glendale, Calif. Appliaftion April 10, 1950, Serial N0. 154,983

9 Cl'diis. (Cl. 299`1) This invention relates to fluid discharging and distributing devices and relates more particularly to sprinkler heads and nozzles. It is a general object of the invention to provide improved sprinklers and nozzles of the type disclosed in my copending application for United States Letters Patent Serial Number 80,287, filed March 8, 1949, now Patent No. 2,589,942.

In my earlier-filed application, above identified, I have disclosed nozzles and sprinklers characterized by a tubular body through which the stream of water or other iluid is discharged, a stem of smaller diameter extending longitudinally in the body and loosely restrained therein and means for imparting a rotary or swirling motion to the fluid as it passes outwardly around the stem, this motion of the fluid causing the stem to gyrate or wobble around in the body while inclined with respect to the axis thereof, so that the stem breaks the issuing fluid stream into well distributed rain-like drops.

In accordance with the present invention. the above-mentioned stem is tubular to conduct an inner iluid stream of substantial volume and is provided at its outer portion with discharge ori ces whereby the moving inclined stem not only breaks up the rotating fluid stream flowing around it but also discharges one or more jets of fluid which follow a` generally rotary course to obtain an eiective wide distribution of rainlike drops. It is therefore another object cf this invention to provide a sprinkler head or nozzle of the character mentioned embodying simple. effective means for producing inner sprays of rain-like drops and one or more outer streams of rain-like drops for covering or irrigating the area around the space covered by the inner sprays. The elements of the device may be reF lated and arranged so that the streams issuing from the tubular stern discharge through the substantially annular outer end rotating stream to wipe or carry away this uid in the .form of somewhat fan or curtain-like inner sprays while the streams from the tubular stem continue outwardly beyond these fan or curtain-like streams. Thus the spray pattern obtained by the device assur-es the heterogeneous or unpredictable "rain drop fall to the ground not only `in the outer region of the area being irrigated but also in the inner region of that area. -By actual observation of the operation of my device. it has been found that there is a substantially equal distribution or discharge of fluid throughout the entire selected area without an undesirable excessively concentrated fall of the uid in any 2 given zone or portion of the area. Owing 'to the eccentric motion of the inclined v 'J'obbling tubular stem, the spray pattern is in the nature o! a series of interm'eshing ellipses which do not necessarily 'repeat identical paths during ythe successlve cycles of stem movement and therefore do not concentrate the drop fall at any given point or points.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sprinkler or nozzle of this character that is operable to discharge a large volume of fluid in a most economical manner. The device priere a minimum of resistance to fijow and therefore creates little back pressure and operates to dis'- charge the water or other fluid in the form oi. relatively large drops with little or no inist or fine spray. This is of primo importance in low n humidity yareas and in windy districts when; the wasteful evaporation and blowing ofthe mist produced by most prior sprinklers and nozzles' is a distinct disadvantage of such prior devices. Furthermore, the free action of the device of my present invention is v'such that 'an eiectve delivery of the rain-like drops is obtained even Where only low pressures are available and as- Su'reS the delivery 0f a axlmli vol'e We ter and the maximum coverage or distributin with a given supply pressure and volume condi tion. This' is important to the farmer 'or orchardist who is often obliged to procure the largest volumetric delivery of water possible in a 'given period of time; The large capacities of the discharge passages andori'ces and the eccentric wobbling action of the tubular stem preclude clogging o! the device by sand, rust or other solid matter and, in fact, the motion of the stem serves to actually clear large solid matterparticles from'the sprinkler. The ability ci! thespi'inkler to discharge a large volui f yatf with a minimum of back pressure permits liquid fertilizer to be induced or aspirated directly in@ to the supply stream to be discharged from the sprinkler together with the water. Iii the past it has been necessary to employ expensive Dump` ing equipment to force the liquid fertilizer into the 'supply stream because of the high hack pressure or resistance to dow created by the convem tional sprinklers.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sprinkler or nozzle of this class incorporating means of adjustment to obtain practically any desired extent distribution or coverage iinder various prevailing supply pressure'and volume conditions. The device may iiicdipdate an adinstinent for the port or ports of discharge Iiii the tubular stem to control or regulate the volume and the vertical angle of the streams issuing from the stem and, if desired, the device may include means of adjustment at the intake end of the tubular stem to adapt the device to handle supply pressures of different values and yet obtain the desired vertical angle of discharge from the outer end of the stem.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device of this character wherein the rotating or spiraling outer stream of water serves as the motive power, while offering a minimum of back pressure, causing the tilted tubular stem to swing through an annular pat'h and about its point of mounting so as to roll or ride on the internal surface of the tubular body, thus obtaining a sun-and-pianet friction drive. In actual operation the stem may move through its inclined circular path at a speed of from 1,000 to 2,000 revolutions per minute, depending upon the pressure and volume conditions, while the frictional`rolling engagement of the stem on the inner surface of t'he body causes the stem to rotate about its own inclined axis at a speed of from to 75 revolutions per minute. If desired, a positive gear drive may be provided between the stem and the wall of the body by forming meshing teeth or serrations thereon so that the stem is positively rotated about its own longitudinal axis as it swings about its point of attachment. In certain embodiments of the invention, where a slower rotation of the stem is desired, as in orchard irrigators, the discharge orifices or tubes of the stem may be pitched in such a manner that the reactive effect of the fluid discharging therefrom tends to reduce the rate of rotation of the stem without, of course, materially affecting the speed of wobbling or gyration of t'he stem about its point of mounting in the body. It is significant that the motor action which produces the wobbling and rotation of the tubular stem is not conducive to appreciable back pressure.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a device of the class mentioned that is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture. The major portions of the sprinkler or nozzle may be fabricated from standard metal tubing appropriately force fitted or otherwise assembled.

Other objectives and features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of typical preferred embodiments, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of one form of the invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal sectional View illustrating the loose mounting or restraining means for the tubular stem. being a view taken as indicated by line 2 2 on Figure 3;

Figure 3 is a transverse sectional view taken as indicated by line 3 3 on Figure 2;

Figures 4 and 5 are longitudinal sectional views of other embodiments, Figure 4 illustrating a portion of the device in side elevation;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a sprinkler of the invention embodying a deflector;

Figure 7 is a plan view of the device illustrated in Figure 6 with the tubular stem appearing in transverse cross section;

Figure 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of still another form of the invention;

Figures 9 and 10 are transverse sectional views taken as indicated by lines 9-9 and I0-I0, respectively', on Figure 8; and

Figures 11, l2 and 13 are diagrammatic views illustrating typical spray patterns obtained with the sprinklers of the invention.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figures 1, 2 and 3 may be said to comprise generally a tubular body I0 adapted to be connected with a source of fluid under pressure such as a hose or pipe P, a tubular fluid-discharging stem II in the body I0, means I2 for restraining and positioning the stem II for axial movement, rotation and angular or swinging movement about a point spaced from the outer end of the body, orifices I3, or their equivalent, for causing a stream of fluid to spiral or rotate around the stem II to actuate the same, and means I4 for regulating or adjusting the fluid flow through the stem I I.

The body I0 may be varied greatly in construction and design, depending upon the intended application or use of the device. In the simple preferred embodiment illustrated, the body I0 is a length of tubing open at its outer end for the discharge of fluid. To facilitate connection. of the body I0 with the pipe P or other source of fluid supply, an adapter-like part I5 may be press fitted or otherwise secured on the outer portion of the body and the adapter part is shown screw threaded on the pipe P. The body I0 may extend into the pipe P and is received therein with considerable clearance, leaving an annular fluid passage I6. In the preferred construction the interior of the body I0 is beveled or flared at the outer extremity of the body as shown at Il.

The stem I I is themoving element of the nozzle or sprinkler and is arranged longitudinally within the body Ill.` In accordance with this invention, the stem I I is tubular and in practice maybe a simple length of metal tubing. I prefer to make the stem il of substantial length to extend through the body I0 from one end to the other. As shown in the drawings, the stem I I extends outwardly beyond the outer end of the body I0 and projects from the inner end of the body to protrude into the pipe P. The external diameter of the stem II is considerably less than the interna] diameter of the body I0, leaving an annular fluid passage I8 which also forms a space in which the stem is free to gyrate or wobble. The outer end portion of the tubular stem II is provided with a deflector or -head I9 which may either be formed integral with the stem or formed as a separate part press fitted or otherwise secured on the stem. The head I9 may be given various shapes as desired. In the construction illustrated in Figure l, the head I9 has a polygonal margin and its under side slopes upwardly and outwardly to assist in directing the fluid issuing from the passage I8, the angle of inclination being selected to suit the intended use. The head I8 is larger in diameter than the body I0 so as to serve as a valve. When fluid is discharging from the sprinkler, the fluid flow raises the stem I I so that the head I 9 is in a position such as illustrated in the drawings, but. when the device is not in use, the under side of the head I9 rests or seats against the outer end of the body to seal off the sprinkler. This prevents the entrance of soil and other solid matter into the body I0 and seals off the body against the entrance of air, thereby reducing corrosion of the sprinkler parts. The deilector head I9 may be quite large in diameter as illustrated in Figure 5 and where the sprinkler is intended for In Figure l I have shown a valve screw 28 threaded in the lower `end of the stem I I to control the fluid inlet ports 2I. This screw 28 may be employed to regulate the flow into the stem I I and thus compensate for differences in supply pressure. For example, where a number of the sprinklers are employed in an irrigation system, the screw 28 of the sprinklers at the lower parts of the pipeline system may be adjusted to partially close their respective openings 2I so that the fluid flow through the stems II of those sprinklers corresponds with the flow through the stems I I of the sprinklers located at higher levels where the fluid pressure is lower.

The invention may be embodied in a pop-up type lawn sprinkler as shown iniFigure 5. In this construction the above-described part I5 is replaced by a member 30 force fitted or otherwise secured to the outer end of the body I0 and provided with a large horizontal flange 3I to be installed at ground level. The upper end of the member 30 has a central recess 32 to receive the deflector head I9 when the device is not in use and the stem II is retracted. In this case the deflector head I9 is preferably at the upper extremity of the stem I I so that there are no projecting parts above the flange 3| when the device is not in use. The self-closing feature is, of course, embodied in other types of sprinklers of the invention.

It is contemplated that stationary deflectors of various shapes and sizes may be employed on the sprinklers. Thus in Figures 6 and 7 I have shown a deflector 33 secured to the body part I5 l by brazing or the like. The deflector 33 has a generally horizontal basin portion 43 with upturned margins and the deflector extends vertically upward from the basin to project above the stem I I when the latter is in its raised operative position. An upwardly and inwardly sloping or curved roof portion 44 continues upwardly from the deflector. The particular deflector 33 illustrated is designed to provide a flow pattern or sprinkler coverage of about 180 degrees, the deflector extending a substantial distance in both directions from the body part I5. The intermediate or main wall portion of the deilector 33 may be substantially flat and rearwardly inclined while its two Vertical margins are curved inwardly or forwardly, as at 34, to direct the streams of water forwardly.

The arrow A in Figure 7 indicates the direction of gyraticn of the stem I l about its mounting means I2 while the arrow B designates the direction of rotation of the stem about its own axis as a result of the sun-and-planet type frictional engagement of the inclined stem with the internal surface of the body I0. As the inclined stem I I is gyrated about the means I2 inthe direction of arrow A, by the action of the angular streaf of fluid flowing through the passage I8, the stein rides or rolls along the inner surface of the body IIJ and as a consequence is rotated in the direction B. Thus the streams C from the openings 26 discharge radially and move in the direction of arrow B and as these streams impinge against the deflector 33 they are directed forwardly or away from the deflector by the curved margin'34. As shown in the left-hand portion of Figure 7, these streams C deflected in this way cross the paths of the same streams C that have moved beyond the end of the deflector 33. the inclined stem II gyrates in the body II), the eccentricity of the stem leaves a constantly moving or rotating area of the passage I8 open for ASl the discharge of fluid. This region is designated 35 in the drawings. The fluid stream discharging from this region 35 of the passage I8 is deflected outwardly by the head I9 and is designated D in Figure 7. The stream D rotates by reason of the gyration or circular path taken by the stem I I and the stream is deflected by the margin 34 of the deflector 33 so as to cross the path of the same stream that has moved beyond the deflector. This is shown in the righthand portion of Figure 7. A portion of the water falls into the basin 43 as a result of the interference of the streams and as a result of the water being stopped at the deflector. This water is not retained in the basin but is picked up and carried away by streams C and D as they move across the deflector.

As described above, the stem II gyrates and rolls about in the end of the body I0 at a much greater rate than the speed of rotation of the stem on its own axis. However, in certain sprinklers, for example. in the large types intended for orchard irrigation, it may be desired to further reduce the speed of rotation of the stem about its own axis so that the streams C issuing from the stem and irrigating the outer zone of the sprinkled area travel at a slower rate. In Figures 8 and 9 I have shown discharge nozzles or tubes 4I! secured in the openings 26 of the stem I I and shaped or arranged to retard the speed of rotation of the stem II. The tubes 40 project outwardly beyond the stem II and are either curved or pitched tangentially and in corresponding directions so that the reactive effect of the fluid discharging from them slows down or brakes the rotation of the stem II about its own axis. Because the stem II rotates about its own axis in the direction B, which is opposite to the direction A of gyration produced by the angular flow of fluid in the passage I 8, the tubes 40 are pitched in the same direction as the openings I3. This relationship is illustrated in Figures 9 and l0. The distribution tubes 40 .project some distance from the stem II so that the streams C issuing from the tubes do not intersect the inner stream D issuing from the passage I8. However, the tubes 40 themselves pass 'through the stream D to assist in breaking up the stream.

The invention contemplates a positive geared or meshing drive between the gyrating stem II and the wall of the body opening I3. Figure l illustrates teeth or serrations 4I on the stem II for cooperating or meshing with similar serrations 42 on the internal surface of the body I0 to gear the stem to the body and thus insure positive rotation of the stem II about its longitudinal axis as the stem gyrates. It is to be understood that the serrations or teeth 4I and 62 may be incorporated. in other embodiments of the invention.

It is believed that the operation of the nozzles or sprinklers will be readily understood from the foregoing detailed description. Referring to the type of sprinkler illustrated in Figures 1 to 5, inclusive, the fluid takes two paths or courses through the sprinkler. In one path it flows through the passage I6 to enter the tangential openings I3 and flow outwardly through the passage I8 and discharge from the outer end of the body. The second path of the fluid is through the openings 2l or the end 2li of the stem II for flow through the stem and for discharge from the openings 26. The openings I3 impart angular motion to the fluid flowing out through the @pooles .It this; motion syretiooof .the Steno .H about its mougins in le The stream .D on@ or the @roo oovoroo Joy the .omission oro- .Stroemof Wotoriowiig .from the Omn Portion ,3,5 through oyoporoiiol- The .Sprinkle ntf'oll termes of the 9 on that the stream D issuing thererfro or .g @rod gentoo@ to tom ivi tbo'wowll of tho'body H1 so that the str-oem C .issuing from the .openings 26 roto@ in tho Isizf-ofstiezo Bf "Those A .S1/rooms whose vol lotes loy the lo.

w 2.1, are proj toreo .oi s toeiooof tineilolli .from Soli.1 sposta,... llyoontmu 1 .xngshwa is qu' al1 v'oluios; it is riot QT' ,oq'rfltinuou's strorjn viously dosoribeq, trie volume am! @rotor-etno. im 9.-.1 the Reseo'lorarched d'revtioriof thestreeip .from liope- 20 Q". 3.5: The if?? .o -.n,gQf-h-.n9n19m-" ings ze may be 'regulated t w111"'byadg.ustng the ous '.heraoter @pdb mgmooe op .of separate rainsorew 2:1." l A 'I A' I n 111@ @TOP-5, di? Tf1@ Sfr? t slgstaild OTC-e @3" any 'eigures 11, I12y and 1 3 ilmtrete in e diagramono point ond'tiorofore oo .rlnoy ,injure .or Llorio'zlo matic manner typigti 'spesi' 'pgttelrgg Bf .the @wiwi/.oil .erode olio soil. sprinklers. Fgliie 14.1 showsstrearn C ,dsharg- 25 .0.1' .dlSlQd-o DI??? Q 1 0T 90,11?- ng @.0 the left( "0h15 .Sm ,i5 `iflgl-y .one .0f ri-qmail??? QnOfith-Sprmlersit has We. the Openings 2 3, s am@ 195g egli, gngggggpd- `observed that t ey produce reliatlyely large rainine outwardly a oolofsider i the outer regiert of the deiiiediy ,the Search@ .afbll dSlbute@ llngihmi 1th? fatiga' :being irri SQ. In this Figure 1l illS/Fi i.S,Sii?li-ig the 30 gated. The sprinklers iroduce practically noiriist other opening oftneetemu isintorsooingtho o1' fino spray @ed there minime?? ,of loss 1are ,coriof tho ooooooo .f E, 1i looeg 'thoiilo Figillflo .-Silu-t-.od to .Pfodeoo little be?? pre'sio :tho Water l1 the stem il is in a position stiloetaggztiaily as .bel-ng free Lto Aflow onkigh the pririlgiers with e HUSWMGQ in Figli@ 7- This W115i f'fam C picks 35 minimum Pf @stri-9 9.1L l The .imparfbitg (of .angfu' up Water Howie@ opworfoly .'ogroliod 'thoo'tom -H lol" ,motion totho o.. A from the passage' portion 4t Per angular Imotion .coixgsttiites .the tive power for radially outward Tous the footer of the gyrotioo ood'roioiino Stom, is ofoooiod 'witlof stroom .C and .the Awater from the passage portion out orooooihoeoy ,Soboio'liol book orfooouro The oo mixed onf-.1 thioamiod .owgio tooroootoo in 4o orotioo ood-rotation o tho-.Stom il ,automoti- Figuro 11 by the stroom E. This mixo Collo' .oloor tho foprihklooo .of diro 'oust yfoto; .iid stroom or spray of ,drops @sie @is oww aoouros froo pootii'o otiolrrof the .Sorlikl'ofslrift intermediate .idisjtalnee eii; alltnges intermediate IZone l,of ,theareafloel Having described only typical .preferred ,emr is to be understood that bor on bodilxierits .of iyetol LIl'o-I`iot31sh-tofbe of the stream .G Whigh limited `to the speeilc giet is fbrfeti, butm ish two openings .26 .ere ooosogo portion .3.5 ,to o streams C Wiobootinoorooot `ortho We from the :Passage portion At streams() maybotlgegiteildt th thermofo, otohs time hea possagoiportion 351s 50 Ifloim: i f f1 ,fluid disohorsinefdoyioe comprising afvbody Hoving .on internal l.ydolixxng a fluid outlet ybote .o tubular .stom orrorilsod .longitudinany .in :tho outlet `loot@ ondfof .smaller-diameter than .the

55 boro to .loot/fo o-fpoosoge therein, .bearing means for il?? .otono et? inoiofoseeoodrom .tho .ouiofoed of tho body-Permittee.-rotoiionlof the Stom'obot ,its otto .foso io f est?? i L\.=...jd @@1396 wgil in .a re

:cation-.ond rotatonoitho stom .able .11.1it..eiseres'ipttrsnioiob ni..

L iributozo of the Witter owithoutfetl noiosi to.rogulotooororooortionftli. idiom. l woto1-oioohoreoo irotn the openings f2.5 sind the A h 11b a passage mouth portion 35. Figure 13 illustrates 75 @om in m tassa@ 11o, .which 2. A fluid discharging device comprising a body having an internal wall defining a fiuid outlet bore, a tubular stem arranged longitudinally in the bore and of appreciably smaller diameter than the bore to leave a passage therein, bearing means for supporting the stem at a point spaced from the outer end of the body for rotation about its own axis and permitting free gyration of the stem about said point while inclined to lean against said internal wall of the body adjacent the outer end thereof, means spaced a considerable distance outwardly from said point for imparting angular motion to the fluid flowing through said passage to gyrate the stem about said point and thus cause rotation of the stem about its own axis by reason of said engagement of the stem with said internal wall of the body, the gyration of the stern breaking up the nuid stream issuing from said passage,

the stem projecting outwardly beyond the fluidf discharging outer end of the body and the tubular stem being open at its inner end for the reception of fluid, and a defiector head on the projecting end of the stem for directing said fluid stream, the projecting portion of the stem having at least one opening for the discharge of fluid from the stem, the last-named opening being directed laterally and being below said head so that the stream of fluid issuing therefrom intersects the stream issuing from said passage.

3. A fluid discharging device comprising a body having an internal wall defining a iiuid con-- ducting bore, a tubular stem arranged longitudinally in the bore and of smaller diameter than the bore to leave a fluid passage therein, bearing means at a point spaced inwardly from the outer end of the body for positioning the stem and for allowing rotation of the stein about its own axis and gyration of the stem about said point while inclined to lean against said wall in a region spaced outwardly from said point, means for imparting angular motion to the fluid flowing through said passage to cause substantial gyration of the stem and thus cause rotation of the stem about its own axis by reason of said engagement of the stem with said wall, the gyration of the stem breaking up the fluid stream issuing from said passage, the stem projecting outwardly beyond the fluid-discharging outer end of the body and the stem being open at its inner end for the reception-of fiuid, adeflector head in the projecting end of the stem for directing said fiuid stream, the projecting portion of the stem having at least one laterally directed outlet for discharging a stream of fluid, and manually regulable means on the stem for controlling the flow from said outlet.

4. A sprinkler comprising a body having an internal wall defining a liquid-conducting bore which is open at its outer end for the discharge of liquid, a tubular stem of smaller external diameter than said bore arranged longitudinally in the bore to extend from the outer end thereof, bearing meansl spaced from said outerk end of the bore positioning and restraining the stem for gyration while inclined with respect to the axis of said bore so as to lean against and roll along said wall of said bore adjacent said outer end thereof and carrying the stem for rotation about its own longitudinal axis, means for imparting angular motion to the liquid flowing through said bore to cause such gyration of the stem, the rolling engagement of the stem with said wall of the opening causing rotation of the stem, the interior of the tubular stem constitut ing a liquid passage which is open at its inner end for the reception of liquid, the gyration of the stem serving to break up the liquid stream discharging from the outer end of said bore, and there being at least one liquid discharge opening in the gyrating rotating tubular stem beyond the outer end of said body bore, and manually adjustable means for controlling the admission of liquid to the interior of the tubular stem.

5. A sprinkler comprising a body having an internal wall defining a liquid-conducting bore which is open at its outer' end for the discharge of liquid, a tubular stem of smaller external diameter than said bore arranged longitudinally in the bore to extend from the outer end thereof, restraining and positioning bearing means spaced from said outer end of the bore permitting gyration of the stem while inclined with respect to the axis of said bore so as to lean against and roll along said wall adjacent said outer end thereof and carrying the stern for rotation about its own longitudinal axis, means for imparting angular motion to the liquid flowing through said bore to cause such gyration of the stem, the rolling engagement of the stem with said wall causing rotation of the stem, the interior of the tubular stem constituting a liquid passage open at its inner end for the reception of liquid, the gyration of the stem serving to break up the liquid stream discharging from the outer end of said bore, and at least one laterally projecting nozzle on the stem beyond said outer end of the body opening for discharging liquid from the stem.

6. A sprinkler comprising a body having an internal wall defining a liquid-conducting bore which is open at its outer end for the discharge of liquid, a tubular stem of smaller external diameter than said bore arranged longitudinally in the bore to extend from the outer end thereof, positioning and restraining bearing means for the stem spaced from said outer end of the bore permitting gyration of the stem while inclined with respect to the axis of said bore so as to lean against and roll along said wall adjacent said outer end thereof and allowing the stem to rotate about its own longitudinal axis, means for imparting angular motion to the liquid flowing through said bore to cause such gyration of the stem, the rolling engagement of the stem with said wall causing rotation of the stem, the interior of the tubular stem constituting a liquid passage open at its inner end to receive liquid, the gyration of the stern serving to break up the liquid stream discharging from the outer end of said opening, and at least one liquid discharging nozzle on the stem beyond the outer end of said body opening directed laterally and tangentially so that the reactive effect of the liquid discharging therefrom slows rotation of the stem.

7. A sprinkler comprising a body having an internal wall defining an elongate liquid-conducting bore which is open at its outer end for the discharge of liquid, a tubular stem of smaller external diameter than said bore arranged longitudinally in the bore to extend from the outer end thereof, bearing means spaced from said outer end of the opening allowing gyration of the stem while inclined at a substantial `angle with respect to the axis of said bore so as to lean against and roll along said wall adjacent said outer end thereof and carrying the stem for rotation about its own longitudinal axis, said bearmosaici inwardly therein, a collar on the stem, andfat; least one thrust bearing washer on the collar for engaging said second'surface, means for imparting angular motion to the liquid flowing through said bore to cause such gyration of the stem, the rolling engagement of the stem with said wall tubular stem constituting a liquid passage; the

gyration of theI "stem serving to break up the liquid stream discharging from the outer'` endv4 beyond the outer end of said body bore.

s causing rotationof the stem. the interior of the.

14 outer end of said body opening, and a stationary deector on the body for deiiecting the streams issuing from said bore and opening.

9. A fluid discharging device comprising a body having a fluid outlet bore, a stem arranged longitudinally in the outlet bore and of smaller diameter than the bore so as to leave a uid passage in the bore, positioning and restraining bearing means for the stem permitting rotation of the stem about its longitudinal axis and allowing the stem to gyrate about a point spaced inwardly from the outer end of the body while inclined discharge opening in the gyrating rotating stemv'- A sprinkler comprising a body having an internal wall defining a liquid-conducting bore which is open at its'4 outer end for the discharge ameter than said `lbore arranged longitudinally in the bore to extend .from the outer end thereof,

20 of liquid, a tubular stem of smaller external dil-5?:

bearing means spaced.; inwardly from said outerl end of the bore guiding the stem for gyration while inclined withlrespect to the axis of saldi?? opening so as to lean r.against and roll along said wall adjacent said-:puter end thereof and journaling the stem foi` rotation about its own longitudinal axis, means gfor imparting angular fno-Q."

tion to the liquid OWng through said bore to ,cause such gyration o1; the stem, the rolling en gagement of the stein with said wall causing rotation of the stem'.`'the interior of the tubular stem constituting aliquid passage. the gyrationl of the stem servingto break up the liquid stream* discharging from the outer end of said bore. and

there being at least one liquid discharge open-v ing in the gyrating rotating stem beyond the with respect to the longitudinal axis of the bore so as to lean against the wall of the bore, the stem having an outer end protruding beyond the outer end of the body, means for imparting angular motion to the uid flowing through said passage to cause gyration of the stem, the engagement o1' the gyrating stem with the wall of the bore causing the stem to rotate, about its own longitudinal axis as it gyrateathe'f gyration of the stem breaking up the uid stream issuing from the outer end of the outlet bore, the stem having a longitudinally extending fluid conducting bore open at its inner end for the reception of fluid. and means on the protrudinguter end of the stem for discharging fluid fromv said bore of the gyrating and rotating stem.

JOHN O. HRUBY, Jn.

References Cited ln the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 510,496 Anderson Dec. 12, 1893 1,078,543 Hadden Nov. l1, 1913 1,140,259 Elliott et al. May 1,8, 1915 1,862,381 Le Moon June 7, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US510496 *Sep 29, 1893Dec 12, 1893 Lawn-sprinkler
US1078543 *Oct 19, 1911Nov 11, 1913Frederick H JohnsonLawn-sprinkling device.
US1140259 *May 4, 1914May 18, 1915Samuel K ElliottHose-nozzle.
US1862381 *Feb 24, 1930Jun 7, 1932Moon Axel R LeSprinkler nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/231, 285/278, 239/222.17, 239/DIG.100
International ClassificationB05B1/26, B05B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/267, B05B3/0445, B05B3/008, B05B3/0427, Y10S239/01
European ClassificationB05B3/00J, B05B1/26A2, B05B3/04C2H5, B05B3/04C2H1