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Publication numberUS2639950 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1953
Filing dateJan 4, 1950
Priority dateJan 4, 1950
Publication numberUS 2639950 A, US 2639950A, US-A-2639950, US2639950 A, US2639950A
InventorsWheeler Claude C
Original AssigneeWheeler Claude C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable traveling scaffold
US 2639950 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1953 c. c. WHEELER I 2,639,950

PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD Filed Jan. 4. 1950 7 SheetS-Sheet 1 FIG I *1 INVENTOR N N E Q CLAUDE WHEELER,

ATTORNEY.

M y 6, 1953 c. c. WHEELER 2,639,950

PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD Filed Jan. 4, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR CLAUDE C. WHEELER ATTORNEY May 26, 1953 c. c'. WHEELER 2,639,950

PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD Filed 'Jan. 4, 1950 '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR CLAUDE 0. WHEELER ATTORNEY y 6, 1953 c. c. WHEELER 2,639,950

PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD Filkd Jan. 4, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. 4 3 1;

' KNVENTOR CLAUDE 0. WHEELER ATTORNEY May 26, 1953 c. c. WHEELER PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD 7 Sheets-Sheets Filed Jan. 4, 1950 INVENTOR CLAUDE c .WHEELER ATTORNEY May 26, 1953 c. d. WHEELER 2,639,950

PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD Filed Jan. 4, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 a I, 46 Y FIG. 10

J I 2 All 9 I f F IM- i 1 I A INVENTOR" A CLAUDE '6. WHEELER,

I BYVg,17MdM%7/w,

ATTORNEY May 26, 1953 c. c. WHEELER PORTABLE TRAVELING SCAFFOLD 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Jan. 4, 1950 INVENTOR CLAUDE C WHEELER ATTORNEY Patented May 26, 1953 STATES FFICE PORTABLETRAVELINGiS'GAFFGIiD :1 Claude 1C; wheeler flxfo idiifl. G.

Application-Ianuary 4, 1950; setialiNo'. 1367732 (ChiSM -eSJ- 7.:Claims. 1 "This 'invention'relates to apparatus for use in the construction; repair and maintenance of highway bridgesandlike structures.

In the constructionbf steel andconcrete .bridgesit is; necessary to place and remove, from below, the forms usedior laying the --concrete floor." This operation has heretofore presented serious. diln'culties.

.It is also necessary to rub and finish or refinish concrete piers, etc,; and .to paint-the'struc- .tnralsteel, andthe provision of equipment where- .by workmen may be'put in position to operate on vsuch inaccessible parts has posed quite a diffioultzproblem.

"TIhegeneragl Object of the present invention is,

therefore, to devise apparatusby which forms or the like maybe readily placed in position "from the top and removed from theunder side' of a bridge, and by which ready accesspmay be had .to the lower surfaoesof the'bridge structureand to .the piers for finishing, paintingand repairs.

Aiurther object of the invention is to provide apparatus of this character in the nature ofa movable .scafiold comprising a supporting framework on wheels adapted to travel along the upper surface ofiithe bridge structure, and thusloe'posi- .tioned at any pointldesired in the length of the Joridg-e,..the framework of the scaffold projecting laterally beyond the edges of the bridge andhav- King arhanger depending therefromat each side to a point below the level of the bridge floor.

A further object .is to devise a, scafiold of this nature which is not only capable of traveling along a bridge, as described in the preceding paragraph, but is also portable. That isito say, the framework, and other portions of the structure are tormed'of parts, put together with bolts andscrews, and can be easily and quickly put together and taken apart, so thatlthe apparatus may beread-ily moved from one job to another, and used repeatedly. This means a greatsaving in material, labor, time and .cost.

Another object ofthe invention is to Provide .a--po11table,.itraye1ing.scaffold of the character described comprising airamework which is laterally adjustable, so as to. .conformwith bridge structures of different widths.

A afurther object is to-prov-ide .a traveling scaffold; of .this natureequippedwithderricks by means of which concrete forms and timbers may or supporting member, extending transversely of thy-bridge; "beneath theii oor' thereo'f, is carried 'by' said *hangers'nand"maybe raised and lowered 'as desired;'-to*aiford access-tda'll parts of the hridg'eistrue'ture including the piers. Yet-"anothen-and' important object of the invention 'isto devise a-niethod and'means' by which such rigid transverse beam "or member may be shifted-into 'aposition "to clear the p'iers whenthe travelin scaffold is mov'ed along-the length' of the bridge.

' With'theabove and 'other objects in view, and to improve generally on the-details of such apparatus; theiinv'ention' consists in"the construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter described"and-claimed; and illustrated in the accompanyingdrawings,- forming part of this specification;and irrwhich:

"" Fig. 1is"aiperspeetiveviewfrom beneath showing broken l'i'nes a 'portion of a bridge and in full lines illustrating my =i'rnproved* traveling scafsold-mounted thereon.

' Fig. 2' is a similarview but illustrating how my improved apparatuscan be used for straddling thebridge piers.

l i'g. is an'elev-ation on arr-enlarged scale of -oneend orthe traveling scaffold-showing one of the hangers depending-therefrom.

*Fig; 4 is a fragmentary vertical transverse section through the apparatus sh0wn'in'Fig. 3.

' Fig. is atragm'entary elevation showingmy' improved clamping means for holding the beams, the heam-itself being shown iii-section.

*Fig. 6 is a fnargrn'en'taryp1a'n -view*of some of the-parts illustrated in-Fig.4;

' Fig. *7 is a fragmentary transverse section on an enlarged s cale' sh owing the wheel guiding means' which I employ.

: Fig. 8 is a -plan view'of' the framework of my improved traveling" scaffold as it appears when supported on the upper surface of abridge, parts *being'in section.

Fig. 9 is av side elevation of the framework shown" in Fig. 8 another-position of theparts 'being'i'rllustratedfin dotted lines.

i s. .IO iand' .11 are similar views; showing my improvedtraveling scaffold in side elevation in lfulljlinesanda portionlof a bridge in transverse section inbr-oken lines, the parts being illustrated in -:diferent .positions intheitwo views-and Fig. 12 is .a'liplan view-10:1" my improved appar-atusgsimilarl to -Fig 8Jout on .arsmaller scale, and illustratingtile method-ct manipulating the beams or girders to enable them to belmoved p ast rthegpiers.

Referring to the drawings in detail, a steel and concrete bridge of conventional design is shown in broken lines as comprising a floor A, curbs B, longitudinal beams C and transverse beams D, supported on piers E.

As best shown in Figs. 8 and 9, my improved traveling scaffold comprises a framework made up of two pairs of transversely extending timbers I and 2 united at their ends by pairs of spaced members 3 and 4. In practice I have found it convenient to use 2" x 6" timbers for the members I, 2 and 3, while the members 4 are preferably 4" x 6". This framework is of a length substantially equal to the width of the bridge being worked on, and in order that the framework may be adjusted to bridges of different widths, the members I and 2 are arranged in-overlapping relation as shown in Fig. 8 and are held together by pairs of clamps and 6. The members 3 and 4 are joined to the members I and 2 by means of angle brackets "I and 8.

At each end of the framework above described I provide a pair of plates 9, these plates preferably lying against the inner faces of the members I and 2 respectively and being interposed between such faces and the ends of the members 4. The bolts which secure the brackets I and 8 to the members I and 2 pass through these plates 9 so as to rigidl unite them with the framework.

These plates 9 project a substantial distance beyond the members 4 and at each end of the framework I provide a pair of horizontal shafts or axles III which are welded to the outer faces of the plates 9, as clearly shown in Figs. 8 and 9.

On these axles II] are rotatably mounted pairs of wheels II, the wheels at each end of the framework lying in the same vertical plane. These wheels are adapted to be supported and roll along either on the steel beams of the bridge frame, before the concrete is poured, or on the completed concrete curbs B of the bridge, and in order to guide them, and prevent them from slipping off the curbs, I preferably provide a trackway or guide as shown in Fig. 7. This comprises a board 38 of substantially the same width as the curb, and resting on the curb, the trackway itself being held in position by a flange 38 engaging the edge of the curb. Secured to the upper surface of the board 38 are a pair of spaced rails 39 between which the wheels I I freely roll.

Referring now to Figs. 3 and 4, as well as Figs. 8 and 9, I provide at each end of the framework a pair of vertical struts I2, which ma conveniently be formed of angle iron, these struts being bolted or welded at their lower ends to the plates 9. A brace I3 is secured to the upper end of each strut I2 and extends diagonally to the outer end of the adjacent axle II], where it is welded to a sleeve I4 fitting over the end of the axle. A tie bar I5 is secured to the upper end of each strut I2 and is anchored at its lower end to one of the plates 9 at a point between the members 3 and 4, as clearly shown in Figs. 4 and 8.

Supported by the pair of axles III at each end of the framework and depending therefrom is a hanger comprising the vertical members I6, each of which is attached to the corresponding axle by means of a connector I'I, embracing the axle but free to slide thereon. The members I 6 are united by a tie bar I8, both the members I6 and I B preferably being formed of angle iron as shown. Secured to the upper end of each member I6 is a crossbar I9 provided with a series of holes 20, through any one of which may be passed a bolt uniting the crossbar I9 with the strut I2. Thus, by removing these bolts, the entire hanger may be adjusted along the axles toward and from the wheels as desired, so as to provide the necessary clearance between the hanger and the edge of the bridge.

Adjacent their lower ends the members I6 are united by a tie bar 2I, and are further rigidly connected by diagonally extending braces 22, as clearly shown in Fig. 3.

A bracket 23 is secured to the lower end of each member I6, so that boards 24 may be supported on these brackets and extend from one to the other thereof as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, thus providing a platform on which workmen may stand.

Mounted upon each member I6, at a convenient height above the platform boards 24 is a winch 25, provided with a crank by which it may be turned by workmen standing on the platform. A cable 26 extends from this winch up over a pulley 21, mounted on the member I6, thence downwardly around a movable pulley 28, and thence upwardly to the upper end of the hanger where it is anchored as indicated at 29. The movable pulley 28 carries a hook 30.

In order to provide a support by means of which workmen may have access to the undersurface of the bridge floor and to the piers, I employ a pair of rigid beams or girders of a length substantially equal to the width of the bridge, and designated in their entirety by the numeral 3 I. These girders are preferably of the latticed beam type and are generally similar in construction to the booms used on large derricks. They are shown as of triangular configuration in cross section, fiat on top, and are widest and deepest at their center, like a truss, tapering toward both ends, thus providing a rigid structure capable of supporting the necessary loads without appreciable bending. The girders are preferably made in two sections bolted together at their middle, as indicated at 3I This facilitates portability, and also makes it possible to interpose between the sections a third section, if desired, to extend the length for an extra wide bridge. These beams or girders terminate at each end in a relatively small bar 32, in line with the flat top, so that when supported by these bars, the girders will not turn over. Attached to each of these bars is a clevis 33, adapted to be engaged by the hook 30, as clearly shown in Fig. 4.

It will now be understood that these beams or girders 3| may be suspended between cables 26 and hooks 30, and may be raised or lowered as required by means of the winches 25. When the cables are drawn up as far as possible, the bars 32 at the ends of the girders lie snugly beneath the brackets 23 as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, and these bars may be locked in this position and clamped to the hangers by the clamping device shown in detail in Fig. 5. This device consists of an angular member 34 pivoted at its lower end at 35 to the member I6 and adapted to be held in the position shown in full lines by means of a turnbuckle 36 anchored to the tie bar 2I at 31. When in this position it will be seen that the member snugly embraces the bar 32 at the end of the girder and locks it to the hanger. The pair of girders or beams, when thus locked at their ends to the hangers, provide a rigid structure on which any desired number of boards 24, extending from one girder to the other, may be supported, thus providing a platform on which workmen may stand beneath the floor of the bridge. If it is desired to space this platform further away from the bridge fioor, the clamps 34 may be released and the beams or girders lowered. bymeans :of vthe;:cableswzfi-iand winches 25, :until itherdesired rposition lisreached.

dnvFi 2"."I' havenillustraiiediihowzthe hairs 'of beamsor girders 3-1|-= mayrbez'arrangedto straddle the piers E of the bridge soithartrblritnlaoingrboards 24 ansczt onrthesezgirderswaccesscmay be had by- .wonkmen; @to all four :sides: .teachrpien? c135 raisinggor zlowering.ythe girders as nequiredrthe .worlrmenmay operate-on the. rpiershthroughout their entire, rheight. :Buch arrangement: :is particularlya-ausefiuliinrfinishingrnrtrefinishing the piers.

My improved traveling :scafiuld also .;comprises aipair o'icderricksamountedmneataeaohiendnfrthe transverselyrrextending.iramework. 'f-cEach derrick .coinruzirises :a post-J 4s. :rctatably :rrxoimted at the center of the niemberzi i assclearlyxshown:irnFigs. 3: and-n, and :a. boomydrlnpdyoted .tdthe postrat42. Secured ltorthextop :of thEJDDS'GWU risaaplateilfiy and from thisrplate: extend tpairi of: diagonally dis-'- posed 913133065. M attached at" their.- lower'rends to the member .3, preferabl -b ::meanszof ."the same boltsatl'iai, JIIOId 'theibraieket'lfiir 1 Thus .the =post' 40 is rigidly supported. .A chain 5'1 .is-;a;ttached-i at one: endtoi the .outer iendicofitheiiboonr 4d. sand-extendsratiitsiother': end: through :a. keyhole slot :52 formedzdn 1a: platewfid'swiveled toith-e 130p? or the postfdfl *Thuszbyliaki'ngupronithis 1 chainthe'inolinationrofrtheib'oom may be adjusted as desired.

' Axwinchi t5 'is mounted .on athe :postid'll, ands cable 4.6;entendsrfrom.uthisx'winoh:over a pulley Mat-the rendzoffrtheshoom, to andzaround "a movable: pulley-p48; andiisaanchored ati flsiitosithe bo'om. The movablenpulley deecar-riesma hook 50.

A plate-138 ihaving as-holeutherein; isvsecured to the'bazr sl' at-'its'middle;iandsbyinserting 'the hookrfii] lO'ff. he iderriokdn thisRhOle, the entire hanger. :may :beuraisedtend-flowered :as required when attanhingaitztorordisconnecting it from the axlesw.

Referringtagain ttoiflig. 9, .it. will be understood that when-thezframeworkis.imthepositiori shown in .fullp-lmes,vitznecessarilyzblonks:the roadway over the 'bridge. Viihenitispdzesired to open this road- WayL-SOrthat trucks-.orrthe likermaypassithrough, thelframework is shifted to;-the p'ositionindicated indotted lines. Tozdothisitheiboltszofithe clamps 5 and 6 are. loosened,...=and thesexclamps shifted to, the ileft. :to '1.the:.p:ositions.:shownin: dotted lines in theelower. part; ofathefrguregthewclamps beingpmovedzbeyondmhe.endrofthe membersil L This permitsxthev membersvI; and :2 rto..mov@ :angularl-y with respect to each other, the clamp 6 occupy ing substantially a. central position and fitting loosely enough to permit the angular displacementiof. the menibers as shown. -To maintain the parts iinwthe position'lshownr-inudotted lines, the bolts of the clamp 6 maybe then tightened.

It remains to describe the manner in which, by means of-my improved apparatus the girders or beams'ISt-may be moved around. the piersasthe scaffold; travels along the length, of the bridge.

' When it 'is desired to moveltheigirders past -a pier, lproceed as follows. ..I.firstattacmthe-lhook fill-of one of the derrick cables 65' to the center of the girder or truss 3| to be moved, as indicated in Fig. 10. Then the clamps 34 at each end of this truss or girder are released, so that the girder is free to swing. I then take up on the boom cable 46 by winding the winch 45, while at the same time I slacken the cables 26 at the ends of the girder. This process is continued until the truss or girder has been shifted endwise into the position shown in Fig. 11 in which it is suspended by the derrick, and in which its center hangs di- 6 sredtly below-:thelderrick pulley; ,I. then-disconnectrthe ihOQk 5010f the-r cablerdfi from the inner end rofzithewtrussorigirdenmermitting .thishook and cable to hang free as showniiniull'linesat the left of Fig. 11. This can be neadilyiaccomplishedrbya workmanion' the other tnussor girder. Mter :nthe -0Brble'r it has been-disconnected from the". 1111191.,611dn0f thetruss -or girder it is swung aroundi-nto a, positionv substantially parallel with theredge of the bridgeas shown in :full linesin Eig.id2..- -ilihe,.'scafiold=can.ythen he -moved along therbnidgelas far as desireduntil-the pier ispassed. ithe trussnor girder is then swung around into crosswise position again-as indicated in dotted linescin 'lFligr 12 and-the cable 26 from the other side-of: the-bridge .is then: connected to the inner and ofithetmisssor girder asshownin-dotted lines inzgil ig. =11. The-derrick cable is then ,slackened while the-two "winch.- cables :26: are progressively tightened up, and this is continueduntil the truss or girder goes-back to its original position in which itlextends-transversely of the bridge. When it v.has :been raised up into engagement with. the hangers; thepturnbuckle clamps 3d are again .fastoned:around thebars 32, thus rigidly securing the 21311155. :position. The second truss or girder may then be manipulated in the samermanner.

It will -thus be seen that I have provided .a traveling scaffold which can, be moved from one end'lof .the bhidge-tohthe(other, this scaffold comprising ;beams or girders extending transyersely beneath the bridge, which beams or girders may beshifted to a position :in which-they .can move past the. piers, as the scaffold-travelsalong. It will. also-beseen that [by means of my improved arrangement oftbeams or girders Lhave provided means by which access may be had both to any part of the :undersurf-ace of the bridge structure and to allsides of the piers, throughout theirs-entire: height.

, .ltrwillibe understood that: my hovel-traveling scaflfold'zis .intendedtobeemployed in the original construction of bridges and the like, as -wel1.as in their maintenance ,and repair. Thus,- as .above mentioned, the wheels ofthezscaffold-may-be.supportedend' roll along-on the steel beams of the bridge, as soonbas-theyare put in place, and before the concrete is poured. .At this zstage, the derricltsymay be :usedztoedvantage in-hoisting and erecting -.ou-:-setting the forms for the concrete.

Also, atithisstage, the girders or trusses may be employed to afford access to the-steel nnderstructure of the .bridgefor painting.

- "Aftertheconcrete hasbeenqpoured and hasset, the- Wheels .ofthe scaffoldare'supported. on the flooraorcurbsoi the bridge, asabove described, andnthederricksimay be employed ,ior wrecking or ;pullingout"the forms from below-the floor. These terms mayreither belowered'tothe ground, or:hoisted up onto the floor; aszdesired.

. Itxwill- :be :noted 'that,.;as :above :BOilltEd out, the parts oftheitramework :ofithe scaffold are secured by aboltsrand chimpsyso .that-ztheyare .readilyseparable, andLcanbe: easiiyxand aquickly :takenwdown andaput together. zAlso,. the 'girders'or trusses .are separately fabricated units, detachable from the hangers which support them. Thus, the entire equipment may be readily disassembled, transported from one place to another, and again set p.

In conclusion, it will be seen that I have pro vided a novel, portable, traveling scaffold which may be used repeatedly on successive jobs for the construction, maintenance and repair of highway bridges and the like, with a tremendous saving in time, materials, labor and cost, and it is thought that the many advantages of the invention will be readily appreciated by those familiar with such matters.

What I claim is:

1. A travelling scaffold comprising a frame extending transversely across and over the deck structure of a bridge, means supporting said frame on said deck structure for longitudinal movement therealong, said frame having portions projecting outwardly beyond the lateral edges of said deck structure, a hanger fixed to and depending from each of said projecting portions to a position below the bottom of said deck structure, a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rigid beams extending between the lower ends of said hangers at a level below the bottom of said deck structure, and means for releasably and independently supporting each end of each beam from said hangers.

2. A scaffold as defined in claim 1 wherein said frame comprises slidably related pairs of elongated members extending transversely of said deck structure, the members of said pairs being relatively adjustable to vary the distance between said frame supporting means, said members being further relatively pivotally adjustable to extend inwardly and upwardly from opposite sides of said deck structure whereby to permit movement of traffic thereunder, and means for clamping said members together in said positions of adjustment.

3. A travelling scaffold comprising a frame extending transversely across and over the deck structure of a bridge, means supporting said frame on said deck structure for longitudinal movement therealong, said frame having portions projecting outwardly beyond the lateral edges of said deck structure, a hanger fixed to and depending from each of said projecting portions to a position below the bottom of said deck structure, a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rigid beams extending between the lower ends of said hangers at a level below the bottom of said deck structure, means for releaseably and independently supporting each end of each beam from said hangers, each of said hangers including means at the lower ends thereof for fixedly supporting a relatively narrow platform substantially parallel to the edges of said deck structure below the level thereof and adjacent the supporting means for said beams.

4. A travelling scaffold comprising a frame extending transversely across and over the deck structure of a bridge, means supporting said frame on said deck structure for longitudinal movement therealong, said frame having portions projecting outwardly beyond the lateral edges of said deck structure, a hanger fixed to and depending from each of said projecting portions to a position below the bottom of said deck structure, a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rigid beams extending between the lower ends of said hangers at a level below the bottom of said deck structure, means for releaseably and independently supporting each end of each beam from said hangers, said means for supporting said beams on said hangers including means for independently raising and lowering each end of each beam relative to said hangers.

5. A travelling scaffold comprising a frame extending transversely across and over the deck structure of a bridge, means supporting said frame on said deck structure for longitudinal movement therealong, said frame having portions projecting outwardly beyond the lateral edges of said deck structure, a hanger fixed to and depending from each of said projecting portions to a position below the bottom of said deck structure, a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rigid beams extending between the lower ends of said hangers at a level below the bottom of said deck structure, means for releaseably and independently supporting each end of each beam from said hangers, said means for supporting said beams on said hangers including separate latch means on said hangers arranged to engage and lock each end of each beam to said hangers in a predetermined position at said level.

6. A scaffold as defined in claim 5 wherein said latch means each comprises a member pivoted to one of said hangers and arranged to extend under and engage the outer face of an end of one beam positioned against a side of said hanger, and means for applying pressure to said member to clamp said beam end against said hanger.

7. A travelling scaffold comprising a frame extending transversely across and over the deck structure of a bridge, means supporting said frame on said deck structure for longitudinal movement therealong, said frame having portions projecting outwardly beyond the lateral edges of said deck structure, a hanger fixed to and depending from each of said projecting portions to a position below the bottom of said deck structure, a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rigid beams extending between the lower ends of said hangers at a level below the bottom of said deck structure, means for releasably and independently supporting each end of each beam from said hangers, and hoist means for separating either of said beams by its mid portion and for moving said beams endwise to position the mid portions thereof outwardly of an edge of said deck structure, said hoist means being arranged to pivotally support a beam so moved about a generally vertical axis substantially at said mid portion.

CLAUDE C. WHEELER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 853,161 Clarke May 7, 1907 1,368,663 Deest Feb. 15, 1921 1,427,453 Fleming Aug. 29, 1922 1,523,438 McMillan Jan. 20, 1925 2,190,093 Bossart Feb. 13, 1940 2,357,443 Medenwald Sept. 5, 1944

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2669490 *Feb 6, 1952Feb 16, 1954Kaufman Construction CompanyTraveling scaffold for bridges and the like
US2919763 *Nov 22, 1954Jan 5, 1960Kronhaus SemenMarine scaffold
US3035659 *Mar 16, 1961May 22, 1962Sims Robbie AForm stripping scaffold
US3076522 *Oct 3, 1960Feb 5, 1963Goodell Harvey LBridge scaffold apparatus
US3145801 *Apr 23, 1963Aug 25, 1964Callahan Frederick SScaffold staging
US3608670 *Apr 13, 1970Sep 28, 1971Blake James HScaffold tender
US4074789 *Feb 13, 1976Feb 21, 1978Armco Steel CorporationMobile rolling support system for scaffolding used in building construction
US4828073 *Mar 6, 1987May 9, 1989Friday Ronald WMobile suspended scaffold
US5549176 *Sep 9, 1994Aug 27, 1996Modern Bridge Forming Co., Inc.Bridge construction machinery and method for constructing bridges
US6269904 *Feb 27, 1998Aug 7, 2001Fps Investments, LlcTruss style trolley beam for a fall protection system
US8191174May 11, 2009Jun 5, 2012Warrior Sports, Inc.Protective glove elements with flexible materials in the joints
DE1216914B *Jul 13, 1962May 18, 1966Hilgers AgBrueckenbesichtigungsgeraet
DE3824921A1 *Jul 22, 1988Jan 25, 1990Alfons MoogArrangement for travelling beneath bridges
WO1996007795A1 *Apr 17, 1995Mar 14, 1996Modern Bridge Forming Co IncBridge construction machinery and method for constructing bridges
Classifications
U.S. Classification182/37, 182/145, 182/129, 182/147
International ClassificationE01D19/10, E01D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01D19/106
European ClassificationE01D19/10C