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Publication numberUS2640118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1953
Filing dateDec 15, 1950
Priority dateDec 15, 1950
Publication numberUS 2640118 A, US 2640118A, US-A-2640118, US2640118 A, US2640118A
InventorsEdwin G Werner
Original AssigneeEdwin G Werner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coaxial cable connector
US 2640118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 6,1953 E. G. WERNER 2,640,118

COAXIAL CABLE CONNECTOR Filed Dec 15, 1950 Antenna Lead- In t": r1: H\ 16 Z0 g 1 7 10 12 50 14 q W? I Antenna f I -Out lets n, 0 044.

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T. V. Receivers INVENTOR EDWIN G.WERNER ATTORN EY Patented May 26, 1953 COAXIAL CABLE CONNECTOR Edwin G. Werner, Park Ridge, N. J.

Application December 15, 1950, Serial No. 200,979

Claims.

This invention relates to a device for connecting an electrical appliance to a coaxial cable and refers more particularly to a connector for use in a system where a plurality of such devices as television receivers, microphones, amplifiers, and the like are connected to a coaxial cable distribution system.

The proper, interference-free operation of a television receiver depends in part on its being in balance with its antenna from the standpoint of impedance. In the case of a multiple installation where several receivers are connected to a master antenna through a coaxial cable system, the proper matching or balance of the system is disturbed if a receiver is disconnected from or added to the system. The subtraction from or addition to such a system of one or more receivers consequently may cause faulty operation of other receivers connected to the system. Similar difficulties are encountered in systems where microphones, amplifiers, and similar devices are interconnected through a coaxial cable system.

It is the principal object of this invention to overcome these difficulties. More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a connector for a multiple-outlet coaxial cable distribution system which maintains the impedance balance of the system whether or not a device is connected to it.

The invention by means of which this object is achieved, comprises a coaxial cable connector provided. with a fixed resistor of such value as to maintain in the distribution system the proper impedance whether or not an appliance is connected to it and is automatically placed in the circuit when an appliance is disconnected and removed from the circuit when the appliance is connected.

In the drawing:

Fig. l is a sectional view of a connector embodying the invention; and

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic representation of a master television antenna system to which are connected several television receivers each connected to the system by means of a connector embodying the invention.

Referring to Fig. l of the drawing, a connector embodying the invention comprises a metallic housing H adapted to be mounted for example in a conventional outlet box in wall or floor. Secured within one portion of the housing H is an insulating bushing Ill having a central aperture therethrough. Concentric with this aperture is a cavity 12 within which is movably mounted a female receptacle M. The closed end of the receptacle I4 is connected to a rigid conductor I6 which extends through the aperture in the bushing l0 into another portion of the housing H. Between the base of the receptacle I4 and the base of the cavity l2 and bearing against both is a spring IT. A contact member !8 is carried by the conductor 16, and a second contact member 28 is secured to the opposite end of the bushing Ill. A fixed resistor 22 is electrically connected to the contact member 20 and the wall of the housing H. A flexible conductor 24, such as a length of copper braid, is electrically connected to the rigid conductor l6 within the housing H and to a terminal 26 in an insulating closure 28 in the housing H. The electrical conductors 21, 29 of a coaxial cable or an antenna lead-in may be attached to the terminal 25 and to the housing H in conventional manner. Screw threads 38 are provided on the portion of the housing H in which the receptacle I4 is located.

In the use of the connector of the invention, when the male plug 32 of a connector 34 attached to a device to be connected to a coaxial cable distribution system provided with such connectors is inserted into the female receptacle M, the latter is urged into the cavity l2 of the bushing I0 against the action of the spring I! and is held in that position so. long as the connectors are screwed together. This causes the rigid conductor [6 to move into the housing H thus moving the contact member l8 into the position shown by the dotted portion of the drawing and thereby breaking the contact between the contact members I8, 29 and cutting the resistor 22 out of the circuit. On the other hand, when the device is disconnected, the spring I! causes the receptacle l4 and the attached rigid conductor 16 to move in the opposite direction, outwardly of the cavity l 2, and thereby to bring the contact members l8, 2!! into contact with each other and thus to place the resistor 22 in the circuit. The use of the flexible conductor 24 within the housing H permits this movement of the receptacle l4 and the rigid conductor I 6 without disturbing the electrical connection to the coaxial cable.

The connector of the invention is particularly advantageous for use in connection with a master antenna system to which several television receivers are connected, for instance in a multipleunit dwelling. Such a system is shown diagrammatically in Fig. 2 of the drawing. There an antenna is connected through a conventional distribution device to a plurality of outlets each of which is provided with a connector embodying the invention. To each outlet may be connected a receiver, and any one of these receivers, or any number of them, may be removed without causing the system to become unbalanced. Similarly, additional receivers may be connected to the system Without disturbing its balance, provided connection is made through a connector of the invention.

The value of the resistor used in the connector of the invention will depend upon its intended field of use. For instance in a television master antenna installation the resistor should have a value of 300 ohms.

Although the invention ha been described with particular reference to its use in multi-unit television receiver installations, it is not limited to such use but is suitable for use in any coaxial cable distribution system to which a plurality of devices is removably connected. Similarly, although specific details of construction have been described, such description is illustrative only, and equivalent construction within the scope of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A coaxial cable connector comprising a metallic housing having a movable female receptacle mounted therein and insulated therefrom; a fixed resistor connected to said housing; a contact member actuated by movement of said receptacle and adapted to make electrical contact with said resistor; and resilient means urging said contact member into electrical contact with aid resistor When said receptacle is empty.

2. A coaxial cable connector comprising a metallic housing for attachment to a coaxial cable; an insulating bushing in said housing having a contact member at one end thereof; a movable female receptacle in said bushing; a conductor connected to said receptacle; a contact member carried by said conductor; a fixed resistor connected to said first contact member and to the Wall of said housing; and resilient means urging said contact members into electrical contact with each other when said receptacle is empty.

3. A coaxial cable connector comprising a metallic housing having a terminal therein for attachment to a coaxial cable; an insulating bushing in said housing having a contact member at one end thereof; a movable female receptacle in said bushing; a conductor connected to said receptacle and to said terminal and having a flexible portion; a contact member carried by said conductor; a fixed resistor connected to said first contact member and to the wall of said housing; and resilient means urging said contact members into electrical contact with each other when said receptacle is empty.

4. A coaxial cable connector comprising a metallic housing closed at one end and having a terminal for attachment to a coaxial cable; an insulating bushing in the other end of said housing having a cavity therein; a female receptacle movably mounted in said cavity; resilient means mounted between said receptacle and said bushing; a rigid conductor connected to said receptacle and extending through an aperture in said bushing; a flexible conductor connected to said rigid conductor and to said terminal; a contact member carried by said rigid conductor; a second contact member on said bushing; and a fixed resistor connected to said second contact member and to the Wall of said housing; said resilient means urging said contact members into electrical contact with each other when said receptacle is empty.

5. In a coaxial cable distribution system, an outlet into which an appliance may be inserted, said outlet being provided with a connector comprising a metallic housing; a movable female receptacle in said housing and insulated therefrom; a fixed resistor electrically connected to said housing; a contact member actuated by movement of said receptacle into and out of contact with said resistor; and resilient means urging said contact member into contact with said resistor when no appliance is connected to said outlet.

EDWIN G. WERNER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,431,622 Benjamin Oct. 10, 1922 1,637,090 Rumble July 6, 1927 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 315,938 Great Britain July 25, 1929

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2767267 *May 11, 1954Oct 16, 1956Tru Connector CorpHigh frequency connector unit
US2986613 *Mar 11, 1958May 30, 1961Liquidometer CorpLiquid fuel measuring system for aircraft drop tanks and electrical connector usabletherewith
US3014979 *Dec 18, 1958Dec 26, 1961Gen Motors CorpIgnition lead cable
US3041503 *Nov 3, 1958Jun 26, 1962British Thomson Houston Co LtdElectrical connections to igniters or electrical supply units
US3122606 *May 22, 1961Feb 25, 1964British Insulated CallendersLow induction, high voltage, bushing connections to tanked electrical apparatus
US3171887 *Jan 16, 1963Mar 2, 1965Pyle National CoShielding and sealing gasket construction
US3345491 *Nov 9, 1962Oct 3, 1967Robert E BadgerBattery testing adapter
US3525056 *Jan 23, 1969Aug 18, 1970Jerrold Electronics CorpSelf-terminating signal outlet
US3873785 *Oct 25, 1973Mar 25, 1975Magnetic Controls CoElectrical connector
US3946390 *Apr 7, 1975Mar 23, 1976Motorola, Inc.Radio frequency connector system for portable radios
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US8419464 *Dec 13, 2010Apr 16, 2013Ppc Broadband, Inc.Coaxial connector with integrated molded substrate and method of use thereof
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Classifications
U.S. Classification333/22.00R, 333/136, 174/151, 439/944, 200/51.1, 439/32, 174/88.00C, 174/75.00C
International ClassificationH01R13/703, H01R13/646
Cooperative ClassificationH01R24/46, H01R2103/00, H01R13/703, Y10S439/944
European ClassificationH01R24/46