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Publication numberUS2640546 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1953
Filing dateMar 11, 1949
Priority dateMar 11, 1949
Publication numberUS 2640546 A, US 2640546A, US-A-2640546, US2640546 A, US2640546A
InventorsBaker Reuben C
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for operating tools in well bores
US 2640546 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2, 1953 R. c. BAKER 2,640,546

. APPARATUS FOR OPERATING TOOLS IN WELL BORES Filed March 11, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 5035 C: BAKER,

' INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS June 2, 1953 R. c. BAKER APPARATUS FOR OPERATING TOOLS IN WELL BORES 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 11, 1949 mm m Km m mm m a M m a wm w w m C ,EESE? Y i w z g: A i$- r0 5 a w. M H m n W ww a 7 s r a 4 w w 6 A p 0 553.

Patented June 2, 1953 APPARATUS FOR OPERATING TQOLS IN WELL BORES' Renloen fi. Baker, Goalinga, Calif., vassignor 120.

Baker {Oil T s, 1 rno fla it a W" ratio-not Galifornia ApplicationMarch 11, 1949, S-erialNo.'80,851 iaciaims. (o1.--1ee--.12-)

The present invention relates to the setting or operating of-well packers, and other well tools, in casings, liners, and similarcond-irits positioned in well bores.

Heretofore, production packers h-ave been run and set in Wei-1 bores by means of a-tubular-string extending to the top of the well hole. Sue-h arrangements have been provided'to assure a substantially unobstructed central passage through the well packer after it-has 'been set, and iollowing removal of the tubular string therefrom, toenable the subsequent running-of production equipment into or through the packer.

The running of awell paclrei-ina well bore on a tubular string is atime consuming and, therefore, costly operation. Notonly 'istime consumed in running the 'wellpacker on the tubing string in the well casing, but the operation of removing the tubing string from the Well casing also involves extended time-and effort.

Accordingly, an object of the presentinvention is to provide a well packer apparatus-which includes a packer settingarrangement that enables that well packer to 'be run inth'ewell'bore on a wire line considerablyfa'ster than'with 'thejusua'l tubing string arrangement. As a result, after setting of'the well packer, the setting toolcan be rapidly elevated from the Well bore on thevwire line.

Another object of the invention is toprovide a well pack-er apparatus, including a setting arrangement for anchoring the well packer in a well casing, the setting arrangement beingreleasable from the well packer to leavethe central bore through the latter substantially unobstructed.

Awfurther object. of the invention is to provide a well packer apparatus adapted to be run in a well casing on a wire line, and embodyinga setting tool which can be completely released and entirely withdrawn from cooperation with the well packer following setting of the jlatterin the v; ell casing.

Still another object of the invention is-to proide an improved releasingmechanismfor detachaoly securing a settin tojolto a well packer, or other well device.

This invention possesses manyother advantages, and has other objects which maybe made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form inwhich it maybe embodied. This form is shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. Itwill now loerdescribed'in detail, for the purpose of ,illustrating the general principles of the invention;

tudinal section through a well apparatus and" well easing, disclosing a setting tool and packer with their parts-in the initial positions they no copy during running of the equipment in the well oasingj-Fig. lb forming a lower continuation of Fig. la, and Fig. 1d forming a lower continuation of Fig. 1;

Figs. 2, 2a and-2b are views corresponding to Figs. i, la and 119, disclosing'the' packer fully set against the well casing, and with the setting toolparts arranged imposition inst prior to release of the setting tool from the well packer;

Fig. 3-is an-enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section of the lower portion of the setting tool and well packer after release of the setting tool from the-latter;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, illustrating the lower portion of the setting tool at the startofits withdrawal from the well packer;

--Fi g.;5'is alongitudinal section-through the'la'tch sleeve forming part *of the setting tool;

Fig. dis a bottom view of the latch sleeve disclosedin Figz5l I In the form of the invention disclosed in the drawings, it is desiredto run a Well packer A to a desired location in a well veasing B disposed within a bore hole; The packer is then anchored in packed-off condition against the well casing through use of a settingtoolfl connected tog'it."

This settingtooliis attached to thejlowerend of a running-in string D s uch as a wire line, eX-

tending to the top of'the well bore,

-The packer A includesatubular body i ll'havingf a body abutment ll threaded on itsT-l ower end;

and an enlarged head .I 2 at upper. end, along which the skirt [3 pf .a cylinder. I4 is slidably mounted. .A cylinder head !5 extendsinwardly iromthelower end of the skirt and .slidablyengages theexternal eylindrical surface of the body IE3. Body ports H5 provide .communication.-betw en theainteriorof the body and the cylinder M, le a e e th b l nd linde -bein prevented by the side seal rings H. The packer disclosed canbe ,runlona tubingstring if desired,

and set -hydraulically, which necessitates (the use of the Writs 1 6. and seal ,rings .l .7. When :thepresen't setting tool C is useilhowevenlthe port s. it andrings ljl mayloe ornitted,although suchlomission is not essential.

A set of upper segmented slips i8 is disposed around the body It immediately below the cylinder head 15. These slips are held initially in retracted position by shear screws 19, attaching them to an upper conical expander 20 initially secured to the body by one or more shear screws 2!. The converging surfaces of the upper set of slips [8 and upper expander 20 are so disposed with respect to one another as to secure the packer A against movement in an upward direction within the casing B, following outward expansion of the slips 18 into engagement with the casing.

A set of lower segmental slips 22 is provided adjacent the body abutment H, and these slips are also secured by shear screws 23 to a lower tapered expander 24 attached initially to the body an by one or more shear screws 25. The direction of taper on the exterior of the lower expander 24 and the taper on the cooperable surfaces of the lower slips 22 are such as to hold the well packer A against movement in a downward direction, following expansion of the slips 22 outwardly against the casing B.

A suitable lock is provided between the body 10 and the upper expander to permit upward movement of the body it within this expander, but to preclude its downward movement. Such lock may be of any suitable form. It is illustrated as including a split ring 2 8 received within the groove 21 in the upper expander and engageable with the downwardly facing ratchet teeth 28 on the body.

A suitable packing 29, such as a packing sleeve,

of rubber or similar pliant, elastic material, is disposed around the body It between the upper and lower expanders 26, 26. The ends of the packing sleeve are received within annular pockets formed between the expander skirts 3B and the exterior of the body.

In setting the packer A, a downward force is exerted on the cylinder sleeve it of sufiicient extent to shear the screws 19 attaching the upper slips Is to the upper expander 2B. These slips are then moved downwardly along the upper expander and radially outward into anchoring engagement with the well casing. Such outward expansion of the upper slips 18 can occur, since their retaining shear screws 19 have a lesser combined shear value than the shear screws 2! attaching the upper expander 26 to the packer body It). These last-mentioned screws have a lesser shear value than the screws 25, 23 holding the lower expander 24 to the body and the lower slips 22 to the lower expander.

After the upper slips [8 have been engaged with the well casing, an upward strain or pull is imparted to the packer body it, which shears the screws 2| holding the upper expander 20 to the body, and moves the lower expander 24 and lower slips 22 with the body toward the upper expander. This action foreshortens the packing sleeve 29 and efiects its outward expansion into firm sealing engagement with the wall of the casing B.

Thereafter, an increase in the upward pull or force on the packer body it substantially simultaneously shears the screws 25, 23 holding the lower expander 24 to the body and the lower slips 22 to the lower expander, causing the lower body abutment l I to shift the lower slips 22 upwardly along the lower expander and radially outward into anchoring engagement with the wall of the casing. The split, contractible lock ring 26 then engages the ratchet teeth 28 formed on the body to lock the latter against downward movement,

since such downward movement is transmitted through the upper expander 20, packing 29, lower expander 24 and lower slips 22 to the well casing B. Upward movement of the body is resisted by the engagement of the lower abutment H with the lower slips 22, the upward force being transmitted from the latter through the lower expander 24, packing sleeve 29, upper expander 20 3nd upper slips :8 to the well casing B (see Fig.

In the manner just described, the well packer A is anchored in packed-off condition against longitudinal movement in both directions within the well casing 13.

The well packer disclosed is designed primarily for use in producing oil and gas wells. It has a central bore or passage 3 I, which can be closed by a flapper valve head 32 pivoted on the abutment H and urged by a spring 33 to closed position against a body abutment valve seat 34. A slotted junk pusher and feeler 35 may be attached to the abutment H to prevent premature setting of the packer during its descent in the well casing.

It is desired to provide an arrangement which will enable the well packer A to be run in the well casing B in a rapid manner. Such expeditious lowering of the well packer in the well casing can be accomplished through use of a wire line D. It is desired to set the packer fully and firmly against the casing without imposing a strain on the wire line. A substantially large strain or pull on the packer parts may be required, and for this reason, the mechanism for setting the packer must be capable of transmitting a large force and of automatically releasing itself from the well packer when the desired maximum force has been exceeded. Moreover, it is desired to set a type of packer which is used primarily in the production of oil, gas, and the like, and which has the unobstructed central passage ill therethrough, in order to permit subsequent movement of production equipment into or through the packer.

The above purposes are efiectuated with the equipment disclosed in the drawings. As shown therein, setting of the well packer is dependent upon the development of a gas pressure within the setting tool C secured initially to the well packer. This gas pressure is developed within the upper portion of a cylinder 36, consisting of a generally cylindrical upper sleeve 31, an upper head 38 threaded into the sleeve, and also an intermediate head 39 threaded into the sleeve. A lower cylinder sleeve 40 is threadedly secured on the intermediate head, and is, in turn, threaded onto a lower cylinder head 4 l The upper head 38, upper sleeve 31' and intermediate head 39 form an upper cylinder portion 36a, whereas the intermediate head 39, lower cylinder sleeve 40 and lower head 41 form a lower cylinder portion 361). These two cylinder portions are separated by the intermediate head 39, but are communicable with each other through a central passage 42 formed through the intermediate head. Leakage from the cylinder 36 through the several threaded connections may be prevented by suitable side seals 43 in the heads 38, 39, 41 engaging the inner walls of the cylinder sleeves 31, iii.

A motivating gas under pressure is generated in the upper cylinder portion 36a, and this force is transmitted through a floating piston 45 and a suitable fluid or liquid medium 44 to the lower cylinder portion 36?) through the intermediate head passage 42, for operation upon a pisacs csa.

ten 45 slidablymounted inthedower cylinder pontion 36b.- This piston 45- has: one or moreiring. grooves 41 inits periphery for the, accommo-- dationof seal rings: 48-; to prevent: leakage be..- tweenthe piston 46- and lower cylinder sleeve. 40.. As disclosed, these rings 48 may consistoffrubhen. round in cross-section,. to guard: against-leakage. in-both-directions.

The upper end of a piston rod 49 is: thread'edly= connected to the piston 4'6; the rod extending downwardly through the lower cylinder head 4|". toa pointtherebelow, where an anvil or-crosspiece 50: is mounted within a transverse slot. 51-. in the rod. Leakage. between the rod. 49 .7 and lower cylinder. head til is: prevented; by suitable, rod packing 52", inthe fcrmof one-or more round; rubber orrubber-like seals, engaging. theperiphery. of therod' and disposed: within suitable ring; groovesxliiiain thehead. 'llhepackingor sealzrings. 52' prevent leakage of liquids from the; well: cas ing. into. the cylinder below: the pistom 46,, insuring; that. air under; atmospheric. pressure is: present. below. the: piston. 46 when: the apparatus; is: assembled, and: lowered in. thewell' casing.

It is. desired. to transfer the. downward. move.- ment. of, or force; imposed upon, the piston. 45''. andthe piston rod. to the upper; slips l8. of the packer, andvitherelative. upward. movement: of. the: cylinder 36. to. the. packer body W, in; order: to. obtain the. desired. anchoring. of. the packerrinthe. welli casing, in the manner.- described above; To. accomplish. this; purpose, a. tubular actuating mandrel 5.4. is threadedly connectedtothe lower. cylinder head. M The lower endof. this mandrel. 5.4 is coupled to; the. packer; bodyit through the. agency of a frangible. connecting; device. As. specifically disclosed; the. lower. end. of the; man.- drel 5.4 is threaded.onto:the upper end: of a ten.- sion: rod: 55,. extending. downwardly; within the packer-body lit. The lower. end of this. rodris... threaded; into a: tension: head. 56 screwed .onto. the. upper end of. a releasing; stud; 51 having anintere mediate; portion 57a. ofreduced diameter. The. lower end of this stud is threaded intdadepending shank. 5.5., that is, in turn, threaded. into: a latch retaining abutment 59; having an-upwardE and-inwardly inclined face: 60.- The; cylindrical. portion. BI, of. the abutment engagesathe packer: valve head32, to. holdit in openposition;

Anyupward force imposed uponthe; tension. rod.55,- tensionhead 56; releasing stud- 51 shank Fill-and.retainingabutment 59ais adapted to helm-- parted-.tothe packer. body H]. This. force is.trans-' ferred from-.the inclined face 680i theretaining abutment ontocompanion: inclined, inner; faces; d2. on latch feet 63 integral with. spring-like leg; members 1. formingthe lower portion of: a latch. s1eeve. 65 extending upwardly'to a point. along: the, tension head 56. Atthispointgthe sleeve; is. provided with; an inturned shoulder 66-that can. be. spacedupwardly from alower flange-or shoulder 6]. on the. tension head. 56. Theouter. inclinedfacestt of the latchfeet engagethevalve seat. 3.4 on. the body abutment. ii, andserve-to. transmit any upward. force imposed on the reetaining abutment. 59 directly to thepacker. abutment, H, which .forms parts ofthe packer body Hi.

When. the. parts. forming themechanism for coupling or. looking; the tension rod 55 and ten:' sionhead 5.6 to thepacker. abutmentv H occupy theposition shown in Figs. lb and 2b,;. thelatch; sleeveshoulder 66.is disposed; a.substantial tance. above the tension. head shoulder 61; The. inclined, face. Bti-of. the. retaining-abutment. 5.9; bears uponthe inclined..faces.-,6 2.of the latch feet;

53a and; tends to. urge; and; hold; themv outwardlyagainst the. valve. seat. a4. Such. outwardimove ment. may, be: limited by engagement of. the lower portions 5.!- of: the: springlegs: 6:4 with the inner surface. ll! of the packer abutment.

Upon. the. exertion of sufficient tension on. the: releasing: stud: 5. to pull it. apart. the shank 5.8- and retaining abutment 59 may drop GOWDWZZYd-r 131;, as;- showrr inFig; 3.; to remove: the abutmentia from its retaining position behind the latch-feet- 63:,. and. allow: thelatter: to be disengaged. from the packer abutment H. The; latch retaining abutment 59' and itsshank: 58: can: drop to the: extent limited by the.engagementof its shoulder H with an-inwardly dire'cted flange-121 011 are-- trieving sleeve-l3." threaded onto the lower end of.the1tension-head:55i

Following disruption of the releasing stud. 57 and dropping of. the latch. retaining; abutment: 59; upward movement. onthe tension rod.- 55 will lift the tension'heact tililwith it, causing the shoul.-- der Bl. on. the latter to. engage the upper shoulder on the latch sleeve; 55, pullingthe latchlegs 54' and. their foot portions 53 upwardly andinwardly within. the packer body it. Such upward. movement ofthe tension rod'55 and tension head. as also causes. the. retrieving: sleeve. shoulder 12; to. engagethe. shoulder H on the shank. 58uand elevate. the. retaining abutment 59 through the packer. Itis to. be: noted that all ofthelooking elements with'v the exception of the. spring like. iootportions. 53 on the latch sleeve. 65, are smaller inv diameter than the, internal diameter. of the passage. 3.1. through the packer body l0. Since thespring-lilre feet. 63. and-legs 64 can flex inwardly, as.i1lustratedin.Fig..4 theentire locking, mechanism may be. removed. from a setwell packer A. and removed. with. the. remaining portions. of'thesettingtool C. tothe top of the wellbore. It. is also. to be. noted that the. initialv distance betweenthe latch sleeve shoulder 56 and tension. head shoulder 56 is substantially lessthan the distance between theshank shoulder 11' and re.- trieving sleeve shoulder 1'2; This. disparity in distance insures against. the abutment 59. again moving within the latch feet 63 during, elevation of the setting. tool after disruption ofthe stud'5'i (seeFig. 4).

The piston rod 49 is movable downwardly within the bore 15'of'theactuating mandrel 54,, the cross-piece 5Bprojecting in opposite. directions. from the rod 49 through diametrically opposed longitudinallyextending slots 16 formed through. the-mandrel wall. The cross-piece 56 also extends into' opposed slotsTl formed through'a setting ring or sleeve'l8's1idably mounted" on' the: actuating mandrel 54; to'form a connection between the'piston rod and the setting ring 18; A. setting sleeve orskirt 19 is adjustably threaded? on the setting ring 18,- the lowerportionof the skirtbein secured to-a" ring resting on' top ofithepacker cylinder'sleeve l 3.

As indicated. above, a forceor pressure is'imposed. upon ailiquid; 443 such as water, resting'on top. of the:piston.;46 This force'moves the piston and; pistonrod:v 49 downwardly and-"thecylinder '3 Sin. a-.relative upward direction. Thedown ward movement of" the rod 49' is transmitted to the, ring. 80 throughztheranvil 5U,- setting'ring 18-, andsleeveflfl; whereastheupward movement-of the cylinder; 364s: transmitted-tothe packer body I 0. through the-actuating. mandrel 5'4; tension rod 55, tension head 56, stud 51, shank 58," abut ment 59; latchfeet 63f.-and-abody abutmentll. Accordinglv; .it-is; apparent: thatzzthe developmentziof sufllcient pressure in the cylinder 36 acting upon the piston 46 will eventually shear the screws l9 holdin the upper slips l8 to the expander 26, and move the slips outwardly against the casing. Thereafter, the cylinder 36 will move upwardly to move the body I6 in the same direction for the purpose of expanding the packing sleeve 29 against the casing B, and the lower slips 22 against the casing, in the manner described above.

In order to obtain the desired operational sequence, a combustible fuel or power charge 81 may be contained within the upper end of the cylinder 36. The combustion charge, such as a railway flare of cylindrical or stick form, is placed in the upper head end 38 of the cylinder 36 within a combustion chamber 82 formed therein. The charge is ignited by a blank cartridge 83 contained within a gun barrel 84 inserted within the upper end of the upper cylinder head 38. Leakage between the barrel and head is prevented by suitable side seals 85 on the barrel engaging the wall of the head.

The barrel 84 is threaded into a cable head 86, which, in turn, is threadedly secured to the upper end of the cylinder head 38. The wire line running-in string D is suitably secured to the cable head 86, in a known manner, and has the lower end of its electrically conductive wire or core 8'! connected electrically to a heating filament 88 contained within the cartridge 83.

When the combustible fuel or power charge 81 is ignited, evolved gas under pressure is produced within the upper end of the upper cylinder portion 36a. This gaseous force acts downwardly upon the upper or floating piston 45 disposed initially adjacent the upper cylinder head 38. This piston carries suitable seal rings 89 in grooves 96 in its periphery engageable with the wall of the upper cylinder sleeve 37, to prevent leakage around the piston 45 in both directions.

Originally, the piston 45 rests upon a fluid medium 44, which substantially entirely fills the cylinder space between the upper piston 45 and the lower piston 46, including the volume of the passage 42 through the intermediate head 39. This fluid medium is predominantly and almost entirely a liquid, such as water, but the upper end 44a of the medium is preferably air, which forms an intermediate cushion between the floatin piston 45 and the water therebelow. In the event of an increase in the temperature of the intervening water, its expansion is permissible without operating the equipment, in view of the presence of the air mass 44a, which will merely be compressed to a certain extent.

For the purpose of delaying a transfer of the liquid medium 44 from the upper cylinder portion 36a into the lower cylinder portion 361), as the floating piston 45 is forced downwardly by the gaseous pressure in the upper portion of the cylinder, a flow restricting device, such as a bean or orifice 9|, is threaded into the upper end of the intermediate head passage 42. The cross-sectional area of the hole 92 through this bean or orifice 9| is much less than the area of the passage itself, the orifice area being so chosen as to allow the fluid to flow from the upper cylinder portion 36a into the lower cylinder portion 36?) at a slow or retarded rate, to avoid sudden movements from being imparted to the lower piston 46,

The apparatus is lowered in the well bore with the parts in the position shown in Figs. 1, 1a and 81 11). When in this condition, the lower piston 46 is adjacent the intermediate cylinder head 39; while the upper or floatin piston 45 is adjacent the upper cylinder head 38. The space between these pistons is substantially completely filled with water 44, or other suitable liquid, except for the small air space Me on top of the liquid, which, as explained above, allows for thermal expansion and contraction of the liquid.

When the depth in the casing B is reached at which the well packer A is to be set, the electrical circuit through the cartridge filament 88 is completed, which fires the cartridge 83. The flame issuing therefrom ignites the upper end of the power charge 8|, initiating its combustion. This charge contains its own source of oxygen to support combustion. As combustion proceeds, a gaseous pressure is developed within the upper portion of the cylinder 36 above the floating piston. As the pressure increases, the floatin piston 46 is urged downwardly and the cylinder 36 relatively upwardly. The force imposed on this floating piston is transmitted through the fluid medium 44 to the lower piston 46, and from this piston through the rod 49, cross-piece 56, and setting ring I8 to the sleeve 19, ring and cylinder 14, which bears against the upper slips "3. Downward movement of the lower piston 46 takes place against the relatively slight resistance of the air in the lower cylinder portion 3% below the piston 46, which is initially at atmospheric pressure, and also against the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well casing acting upwardly across the cross-sectional area of the piston rod 49. When sufiicient pressure has been developed within the upper cylinder portion 36a by the gaseous medium, and has been transmitted to the slips 18, to overcome the shear strength of the shear screws 19, and also the hydrostatic head of fluid acting upwardly on the piston rod 49, the slips 18 are released from the expander 26 and are pushed downwardly along the latter into outward engagement with the casing B.

As the combustible charge 8! continues to burn, the gas pressure within the upper cylinder portion 36a increases to a further extent, and this increased pressure or force is transmitted to the lower piston 46 through the intervening fluid medium 44. Since the upper slips l8 are wedged against the casing, the piston 46 cannot move downwardly to any further appreciable extent. Instead, the cylinder 36, actuating mandrel 54, tension rod 55, tension head 66, stud 5'1, shank 58, latch retaining abutment 59, latch feet 63, abutment H and its packer body ID are urged in an upward direction. When the pressure and force within the cylinder 36 has increased sufiiciently to overcome the shear strength of the screws 2| holding the upper expander 20 to the body 16, such screws are disrupted and the packer body is moved upwardly within the upper expander 26- to compress the rubber packer sleeve 29 between the upper and lower expanders 20, 24, forcing it into firm sealing engagement with the casing wall.

Further increase in the cylinder gas pressure, as a result of the continued combustion of the charge 8|, efiects shearing of the screws 25, 23 attaching the lower expander 24 to the body H] and the lower slips 22 to the lower expander, allowing the cylinder 36 to move upwardly and carry the body I0 and lower slips 22 in an upward direction to shift the latter radially outward into engagement with the casing.

sneez d lhlr 1335511138; inthe cylinder 36 continues, to ncr a d. as com ustionof the e- 8 pr cefidsagand all of the packer elements are, engaged more firmly with the casing B. When the; pressure. exceeds thetensilestrength of the reduced' diameter portion 51a. of the releasing stug:'l-, 5,'l securing the actuating mandrel d indirectly to the body Hi, this studs 5? is pulled apart at its reduced: diameter portion 57a to release automatically the setting tool C from the well packer.

As was indicated above, suchv release of the setting tooloccurs as a result of dropping of the latch retaining abutment 59 and the shank 58 to theex-tent limited'by engagement of the shank shoulder H with the flange 72 of the retrieving sleeve 13 (Fig. 3). This dropping removes the latch retaining abutment 59 from its holding position behind the latch feet 63 and allows the latter to; be pulled upwardly with the remainder of the setting tool C during elevation of the latter (Fig 4'). This upward pulling occurs because of engagement of the tension rod shoulder 61 with the inturned shoulder 66. on the latch sleeve 6.5. Of course, the shank 58 and latch retaining abutmentlifi, aswell as the lower broken, portionof thereleasing stud 5'5, are also elevated, through the well packer A with the remainder of the setting tool, since these elements are supported by the retrieving sleeve flange T2.

Aceordingly, it is'apparent that all of the setting tool mechanism C is released from the set and anchored well packer A, and the entire mechanism, elevated by means of the wire line lit-to thetop of the well bore.

After the setting tool hasbeen removed from thewell casing, production equipment (not shown) may then be run in the well casing for suitable coaction with the well packer A in producing the well from one or more zones below the wellpackerl The central passage 3| through the packer body Ii! is unobstructed, except for the lower back pressure valve head 32, which is readily displaced to one side, allowing the production. tubing and, other equipment to be placed in lea-kproof engagement with the packer body i0, and also allowing such equipment. to extend completely through the packer body, if desired, to apoi-n-t therebelqw.

In addition to leaving the packer bore 3,! unobstructed after'withdrawal of the setting tool C, the settin tool; arrangement insures the placing of the packer body I70 and other packer parts in compression, during; the, setting operation. Essentially all; of these parts are oftentimes made of; readily drillable materials, such as. cast iron, aluminum and the like, to enable the Well packer A .tQ he. removed by a drilling or acidizing operation at: some; future time. Since these materials. are comparatively brittle, it is preferred to placethem in compression during the setting operation rather than in tension, since they possess: much greater strength in compression. The exertion of the upward force at the lower end of-the packer body Hi and its abutment It insures-suchplacing of-the packer parts in compression.

As a result of the present invention, a productionpacker, and, for that matter, other types of well packer and well tools, may be run very quickly in the well casing on a wire line. After the settin operation has occurred, the wire line and the setting tool are removable from thewell a in a a om a a vely rapid rate. This sav- 19 ms n me po sessesi aten-sirev ec nomigadz vantages.

The inventor claims:

ne1l p ratu a we ool-schemata be Set i a Well, qndui tpositiqnedl nv a well bore; asetting tool detachably, secured to; said Well tool, said setting tool, comprising; latch meansreleasably coupled-;-to isaidwelltool; means engaeeah ehai t h: mansi n olding said latch means, coupled to said. well. tool, and m ns: din a e easable,- onn stion arena: iv ly conne o aid old m ans Qrn erting a setting force on, Said)! holding means w c is transm tted t r ughs id sa his n c oidho dinseacsand arm aid oldin me ns hr ug a d: a chlmeao to d well, tool; in order to set said! M811 t 1 wellconduit, said; conneQtiQh; bein d r t r ease hen; a i l ceeds, a predetermined value sutficient tgsg tool in the well conduit 2. Inwell apparatus: awell. t oql ha ving tral passage therethrough, and adapted to be t in a we o u t pos t on dn; awe-intone; a settin to d a hah r ur diasai rwell tool, said setting: tool comp a l a tgh, means releasably coupled to the lower p I Qiyfigid we oo means eneasea ls i h. said atch means r d aidatc me iscoun sd to said. well tool, means inclnd ng a releasable con; nectionwithin said central pass ge and; operatiively connected to said erting a setting force on which is transmitted; through sai well, tool, in order to set sai well conduit, saidconnection be arrang d to e see aid: forc exe t p det mi ed valuesfiicientlto-l set the tool in; the; well; cand it, a d means for W h r w said; re easable connection, i m a s nd atch; meausi i qm the well tool when,- the. remainderg ofi isaid setting toolis elevated fromthe well; tool.

3 In well apparatus: a well: tom-adapted; to be set in a well conduit positioned in; a, U a tt o hab zr c d to aid tool. sai t n tQ l Wi l-12 5 8 r'latch nreans releasably coupled to said well tool, means engageable with said latch means for-holding; said latchmeans coupled to, said well tool, means for exerting a setting force onsaid holdin means which is transmitted from said holding; means through said latch means to said; we1; l,-tool, in order to set said well tool in; thewell; conduit, said force exertingmeans including arele able connection secured to said holding means; and through which the set n force, is; transmitted to said holdinemeans, said releasable connection being releasable to enable said holding means tov move from its position holding said latch means coupled to, said; well: tool, andmeans on said force exerting means engageable with said holding; means for limiting the; movement; of

" said holding means from its holdingposition,

a setting tool detachably' secured to saidiweil to ai S t ng o c r sing latc means releasably coupled to said well tool means gageable with said latch means. for hold aid latch means coupled to said well tool means in,- cluding a releasable connection for eggeigtingan upward, se tin ce on said o ding mea which is tran m tt d rough said releasable 11' connection to said holding means and from said holding means through said latch means to said well tool, said holding means dropping from its holding position with respect to said latch means upon release of said connection.

5. In well apparatus: a body; normally retracted means on said body: a tool operatively associated with said body and, normally retracted means for exerting an upward force on said body and a downward force on said normally retracted means to expand said normally retracted means against a well conduit positioned in a well bore; said tool comprising a latch member adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold it coupled to said body, upwardly movable means, and a connection between said upwardly movable means and retaining member through which the motion of said upwardly movable means is transferred to said retaining member, said connection being releasable upon expansion of said normally retracted means against the well conduit, release of said connection allowing said retaining member to drop from holding engagement with said latch member.

6. In well apparatus: a body; normally retracted means on said body: a tool operatively associated with said body and normally retracted means for exerting an upward force on said body and a downward force on said normally retracted means to expand said normally retracted means against a well conduit positioned in a well bore, said tool comprising a latch member adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold it coupled to said body, upwardly movable means, a connection between said upwardly movable means and retaining member through which the motion of said upwardly movable means is transferred to said retaining member, said connection being releasable upon expansion of said normally retracted means against the well conduit, release of said connection allowing said retaining member to drop from holding engagement with said latch member, and means on said upwardly movable means engageable with said retaining member for limiting the extent of dropping of said retaining member.

'7. In well apparatus: a tubular body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said body and normally retracted means for exerting an upward. force on said body and a downward force on said normally retracted means to expand said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member within and adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold it coupled to said body, upwardly movable means within said body, a breakable connection between said upwardly movable means and retaining member to hold said retaining member against said latch member, said connection being breakable upon exertion of a predetermined upward force on said upwardly movable means, the

upward force of said upwardly movable means being transmitted through said connection to said associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member within and adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold it coupled to said body, movable means within said body, a breakable connection between said movable means and retaining member to hold said retaining member against said latch member, said connection being broken upon ap plication of a predetermined force on said mowable means, the force of said movable means being transmitted through said connection to said retaining member, breaking of said connection allowing said retaining member to shift from holding engagement with said latch member, and means on said movable means for withdrawing said latch and retaining members from said body following breaking of said connection.

9. In well apparatus: a tubular body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member within and adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch mem ber to hold it coupled to said body, movable means within said body, and a breakable connection between said movable means and retaining member to hold said retaining member against said latch member, said connection being broken upon application of a predetermined force on said movable means, the force of said movable means being transmitted through said connection to said retaining member, breaking of said connection allowing said retaining member to shift from holding engagement with said latch member.

10. In well apparatus: a tubular body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member within and adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold it coupled to said body, movable means within said body, a releasable connection between said movable means and retaining member to hold said retaining member against said latch member, the motion of said movable means being transmitted through said connection to said retaining member and from said retaining member through said latch member to said body, and means for releasing said connection to allow said retaining member to shift from holding engagement with said latch member.

11. In well apparatus: a body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member behind said latch member and engageable with said latch member to hold said latch member outwardly in coupled relation to said body, movable means, a releasable connection be tween said movable means and retaining member for transmitting the force of said movable means to said retaining member, and means for releasing said connection to allow said retaining member to shift to a position permitting inward movement of said latch member from coupling relation to said body.

12. In well apparatus: a body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch member adapted to be coupled to said body, a retaining member behind said latch member and engageable with said latch member to hold said latch member outwardly in coupled relation to said body, movable means, a releasable connection between said movable means and etaining member for transmitting the force of said movable means to said retaining member, release of said connection allowing said retaining member to shift to a position permitting inward movement of said latch member from coupling relation to said body, and means on said movable means for elevating said latch member and retaining member with respect to said body following release of said connection.

13. In well apparatus: a tubular body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch sleeve within said body and having depending portions adapted to be coupled to said body, a retainer member within said portions and bearing thereagainst to hold said portions coupled to said body, a tension member within said body, releasable means connecting said tension member to said retainer member and holding said retainer member bearing against said portions, said releasable means being constructed to release upon exertion of a predetermined force thereon by said tension member, to allow said retainer member to shift from its bearing position against said portions.

14. In well apparatus: a tubular body; normally retracted means on said body; a tool operatively associated with said normally retracted means for expanding said normally retracted means outwardly, said tool comprising a latch sleeve within said body and having depending portions adapted to be coupled to said body, a retainer member within said portions and bearing thereagainst to hold said portions coupled to said body, a tension member within said body, releasable means connecting said tension member to said retainer member and holding said retainer member bearing against said portions, said releasable means being constructed to release upon exertion of a predetermined force thereon by said tension member, to allow said retainer member to shift from its bearing position against said portions, and means on said tension member for elevating said latch sleeve 1 and retainer member from said body.

15. In a tool for operating well apparatus in a well bore: a latch sleeve having depending portions movable laterally with respect to each other; a retainer member within said portions and bearing thereagainst to prevent their inward movement, said retainer member being adapted to drop by gravity from its bearing position against said depending portions; a tension member; and releasable means connecting said tension member to said retainer member and holding said retaining member bearing against said portions, said releasable means being constructed to release upon exertion of a predetermined force thereon by said tension member, to allow said retainer member to drop by gravity from its bearing position against said portions.

16. In a tool for operating well apparatus in a well bore: a latch sleeve having depending portions movable laterally with respect to each other; a retainer member within said portions and bearing thereagainst to prevent their inward movement; a tension member; releasable means connecting said tension member to said retainer member and holding said retaining member bearing against said portions, said releasable means being constructed to release upon exertion of a predetermined force thereon by said tension member, to allow said retainer member to shift from its bearing position against said portions, and means on said tension member engageable with said latch sleeve and retainer member for elevating said latch sleeve and retainer member upon release of said connecting means.

17. In a tool for operating well apparatus in a well bore; laterally movable latch means; a retainer member engageable with said latch means to prevent its lateral movement in one direction; a tension member; and a, tension stud effecting a connection between said tension member and retainer member, said stud having a weakened cross-section at which said stud breaks upon exertion of a predetermined force thereon by said tension member.

18. In a tool for operating well apparatus in a well bore: inwardly and outwardly movable latch means; means engageable with said latch means for holding said latch means outwardly; means including a tension stud connected to said holding means for exerting an upward force on said holding means which is transmitted from said holding means to said latch means; said stud having a weakened cross-section at which said stud breaks to allow said holding means to drop from its holding position with respect to said latch means.

19. In a tool for operating well apparatus in a well bore: an inwardly and outwardly movable latch member; a retaining member engaging said latch member to hold said latch member outwardly, upwardly movable means, a breakable connection between said upwardly movable means and retaining member to hold said retaining member against said latch member, said connection being breakable upon application of a predetermined upward force on said upwardly movable means, breaking of said connection allowing said retaining member to drop from holding engagement against said latch member, and means on said upwardly movable means engageable with said latch member and retaining member for elevating said latch member and retaining member following breaking of said. connection.

REUBEN C. BAKER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,809,080 Sweet et al. June 9, 1931 2,225,143 Baker et a1. Dec. 17, 1940 2,266,382 Quintrell et al. Dec. 16, 1941 2,392,244 Hooser Jan. 1, 1946

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/125, 166/217, 166/133, 166/134, 60/533, 166/63
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/06
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/065
European ClassificationE21B23/06D