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Publication numberUS2641066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1953
Filing dateSep 5, 1950
Priority dateSep 5, 1950
Publication numberUS 2641066 A, US 2641066A, US-A-2641066, US2641066 A, US2641066A
InventorsFilardo Laurin
Original AssigneeFilardo Laurin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metatarsal length compensating device
US 2641066 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1953 y l.. FILARDO METATARSAL LENGTH COMPENSATING DEVICE F'led Sept. 5, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l -IN VENTOR Lauri?? z'lamzo BY QM ATTORNEYS June 9, 1953 L. FILARDO METATARSAL LENGTH COMPENSATING DEVICE Filed Sept. 5, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR L darn FZ'ZQWO '/l//l/l//l/ ATTORNEYS L. FILARDO METATARSAL LENGTH COMPENSATING DEVICE June 9, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Sept. 5, 1950 Z9 Z7 Z8 INVENTOR Laurz'n 'lanio BY M ATTORNEYS Patented June 9, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT ,OIF-FICE METATRSAL LENGTH"CQMPENSTING DEVICE Laurin Filardo, Los ifingelea` Calif.

Application rSeptember 5, 1950; Serial No.f183,1'v87 Y (Cl.l 3G-f8.5)

iaclaims. 1

lThis invention vrelates toshoes.

An object of this invention is toprovideaan improved `shoe lconstruction which,"is..-particu larly `adapted for use with high heel. shoesffand includes a displaceable means .disposedinglthe region of the forward ends of :the .-metatarsals so that substantiallythe entire .width :of fthe ball of the foot will bein rm contact with :the shoe sole structure.

Another object of this invention is tex-provide a shoe-sole construction which will automatically conform itself tothe pressure exerted thereupon by the different metatarsals so as to :provide an equal y'support for the metatarsals and will eliminatethe use of conventional wedges Vor other fittings `adapted for different` types of feet.

In the carrying Yout of this invention a deformable ycasing is disposed in theballportion of the shoe, the casing having either a liquid, semi-liquid, or other readily displaceable.and resilient means mounted therein sovthat the casing will readily conform itself .to the pressures exerted thereupon .by the diierent-metatarsalsi With the above and other objects in'view, lmy invention consists inzthe arrangement, combination and details of construction .disolosedin the drawings and specioationl and then moreupartcularly pointed out in theappended .claims.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a lvertical section of a high heel'shoe having a device constructed according to -anembodiment yof this invention mounted inthe ball portion of the shoe,

Figure 2 is a fragmentary bottom plan partly brokenl away and in Ysection of the shoe,

Figure 3 is a transverse sectional view `of .the deviceshown in Figure 1,

Figure 4 is a fragmentary longitudinal section oi' another modication of this invention,

Figure 5 .is a fragmentary transverse-section or a further modication of this invention,

Figure 6 is afragmentary horizontal section of the structure shown in Figure 5,

Figure 7 is a 4fragmentary sectional .view ,of another modification of this invention,

Figure 8 is a fragmentary sectional lviewof a further modification `of this invention,

.Figure 9 isa fragmentary sectional view .of still aifurther modification of this invention,

Figure l0 is a fragmentary sectional ,view of. another modication of this invention.

Referring to the drawings and first to Figures l and 2, the numeral vI9 designates generally the outsoleof a shoe of the highheel type which includes .a shank portion II', azheel:I2,:andaP-zbrace,

. 2 yor Areinforcing member I3 in the.shank-1portion II. insole 'Ill -is disposed within .-the,:shoe, and in the presentinstance a platform .15 is::disposed between thev insole I4 and theoutsolel at'the forward portion of the shoe. An .upper "I6 encompasses the.-opposite.edges .of theeplatform'l andinsolei-Id and is of conventional construction. v

:In order to provide a means wherebytheball portion bf the" foot `generallydesignated as.F will be equally supported transversely'. thereacross, I- have-provided a `fiexiblercasing Ilwhich is disposed inl a cutout formed in therear .portionoftheplatform-II5. The casing Il extends transversely 4across the outsole llil beneath the insole I4 and may be formed .out of. any. suitable flexible or elastic material which 4.is .preferably impervious sothatthe interiorof the Acasing I1 may benlled witha liquid fI `or with .a-serniliquid or readily vdisplaceable .material` which ;is responsiveto Pascalstlawsuch as a .silicon `plas-- tic which is commonly referred to as vbouncing putty. lCertain semi-iiuids such as clay are only partly responsive to Pascals law -because of 'the friction .produced -by the solidsA whichtakegup some'iof .Lthe energy,ibut `these semi-fluids are responsive enough to produce the desired `results. `Certain powdered or granular material such. as powdered graphite, talc or the like may also'be-used as a displaceable element. The rear portion of the `platform I5 is cut off. on a bevel as indicated at I9, and a resilient strip 2G of substantially wedge shape is disposed inthe cutout I9 and bears against .the forward edge 'of the casing I1.

The resilient strip 2!) is substantially triangular in transverse section and isv provided sothat whenthe casing I'I `is `distorted under the weight of. a .foot the shoe,. the :forward edge .of .the casingwill notrbecome pinched or `will not be forced upwardly.

I Abracing plate2l is .disposedbeneaththe casing .I'lv projecting. `forwardly of the. casing :and engaging in a-,recessor cutout 22 which is formed in thelowerxrear portion of .the platform `I 5.` The plate. ZI 'also includes anoobtusely disposed up-l wardly and rearwardly projecting. extension-23 which isqinterposed between the instep `portion ofthefvoutsole II) Aand the insole I4.

Referringnow to Figure 4 there is disclosed a modified vform `of this invention wherein the platform 24 which is interposed between the outsolei-25andv the insole 26is provided with a reduced irear extension 2l. The extension 2l `terminatesiatrtheA lower end portion ofthe instep AI i,

and a flexible casing 28 similar to casing l1 is disposed on the extension 21. Normally the top of the casing l1 will be substantially flush with the upper surface of the platform 24. The platform 24 is also formed with a bevelled cutout 29 extending upwardly and forwardly within which a rubber cushioning strip 30 is adapted to be seated. The interior of the casing 28 is adapted to be filled by a displaceable means 3l which may be the liquid, semi-liquid, or other suitable displaceable material.

Referring now to Figures and 6, there is disclosed another modification of this invention wherein a reinforcing plate 32, similar to plate 2l, is interposed between the rubber cushioning member 33 and the outsole 34. A flexible casing 35 engages on the upper side of the cushioning member extension 33, and the casing 35 is held against lateral displacement by means of a pair of upwardly projecting side plates 36.

An insole 31 engages over the casing 35 and projects forwardly to the forward end of the shoe in a conventional manner.

In the use of this shoe structure, the platform or lift which is provided in the shoe is cut out as herein indicated, and the distortable casing I1 which is filled with a displaceable element such as liquid or the like, is inserted in the shoe at the rear of the platform. The cushion member 20 is also secured to the platform l5 at the forward edge of the casing l1.

When downward pressure is applied to the insole I4 by the foot F, the different and unequal lengths of the metatarsal bones M will cause the insole I4 and the casing l1 to become displaced after the manner shown in Figure 3. The longer metatarsal bones will cause the casing I1 to be pressed downwardly to a greater degree than the shorter metatarsal bones while at the same time an equal pressure will be applied between the metatarsal bones and the casing l1. In this manner where the shoe is formed with a relatively high heel, the upending of the metatarsals will cause downward pressure to be exerted on the forward ends of the metatarsal bones and equalized pressure will be produced on the metatarsals across the entire foot.

Referring now to Figure '1, there is shown a flexible casing 40 having displaceable material 4l disposed therein. The casing 40 extends transversely across the shoe at the ball portion thereof and is disposed beneath a sock lining 42 which is in addition to the regular insole 43.

In Figure 8 there is disclosed another modification of this invention, wherein the flexible casing 44 which has displaceable material 45 therein is disposed beneath a flexible insole member 46 which extends only from the forward or lower end of the shank 46a to the toe 41. An insert 48 is interposed between the insole member 46 and the regular insole 49.

In Figure 9 there is disclosed a further modification of this invention wherein the flexible casing 50 having the displaceable material 5I therein is formed as a shoe attachment or insert, and a flexible covering 52 substantially encompasses casing 5U and an insert 53.

In Figure l0 there is disclosed another modification of this invention wherein the flexible casing 54 having displaceable material 55 is fixed as by glue to insole member 56 which is mounted over regular insole 51.

With the structure as hereinbefore described there is produced a new method of arch support by placing a block of displaceable'material under the forward base of the longitudinal arch, rather than by placing a support under the span of the arch itself.

I do not mean to confine myself to the exact details of construction herein disclosed, but claim all variations falling within the purview of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform between the insole and outsole, a flexible flat casing at the rear of the platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, fluid means in said casing, and a resilient cushion strip interposed between the forward edges of said casing and the adjacent rear portion of said platform.

2. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform between the insole and outside, a flexible fiat casing at the rear of the platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, fluid means in said casing, a resilient cushion strip interposed between the forward edge of said casing and the adjacent rear portion of said platform, and a, reinforcing plate interposed between said casing and said outsole.

3. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform between the insole and outsole, a flexible flat closed casing at the rear of the platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, fluid means in said casing, a resilient cushion strip interposed between the forward edge of said casing and the adjacent rear portion of said platform, a reinforcing plate interposed between said casing and said outsole, and relatively rigid upright wings engaging between the opposite ends of said casing and the upper.

4. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform between the insole and outsole, a flexible ilat casing at the rear of the platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, displaceable means in said casing, a resilient cushion strip interposed between the forward edge of said casing and the adjacent rear portion of said platform, a reinforcing plate interposed between said casing and said outsole, a cushion element interposed between said plate and said casing, and upright wings engaging between the opposite ends of said casing and the upper.

5. A shoe construction comprising an outsole, an upper, a heel at the rear of said outsole, an insole, and a platform interposed between said insole and said outsole between the ball and the toe of the shoe, said platform being formed of a non-distortable forward portion and a distortable rear portion and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot.

6. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper, an insole, and a heel, a platform interposed between said insole and outsole, said platform terminating forwardly of the shank of the shoe, a flat casing extending transversely of said shoe at the rear of said platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, and a liquid in said casing whereby the latter will be displaced under pressure of the ball of the foot to thereby equalize pressure on the foot at the ball thereof.

'1. In a shoe construction having an outsole,

an upper and an insole, a platform interposedl between the insole and outsole, a flexible closed fiat casing at the rear of the platform beneath said insole and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, and iiuid means in said casing.

8. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform between the insole and outsole. a erzible dat casing at the rear of the platform and limited in area by the area of the region of the ball of the foot, fluid means in said casing, and a resilient cushion strip interposed between the forward edges of said casing and the adjacent rear portion of said platform.

9. In a shoe insole, an amount of semi-liquid material disposed across the area lying beneath the ball of the foot, and limited to that area, in a quantity and depth enough to allow the longer of the metatarsal bones of the foot to sink into the material and thrust up beneath the shorter of the metatarsal bones in sunicient degree to afford them intermediary ground purchase cornparable to that of the longest metatarsal, means to hold the said material in the proper position beneath the ball of the foot, and over the said material a retaining membrane flexible enough to allow through it the interplay of the metatarsals with the material below, while strong enough to hold the material from escape from beneath the ball of the foot.

l0. In a shoe insole construction, a quantity of fluid material disposed across the area covered by the ball of the foot, and coinciding with that area, means to hold the said material in the proper position beneath the ball of the foot, the top portion of said means to comprise a exible membrane to allow the interplay of the metatarsals with the fluid material below, whereby said uid material will be displaced by the pressure of the longer metatarsals and will be pressed up beneath the shorter metatarsals to give them support.

11. In a shoe insole construction, a quantity of fluid material disposed across the area beneath the ball of the foot and limited to that area, means for containment at the bottom and sides of said material, a flexible membrane across the top of the material to: complete the containment and to allow the interplay of the metatarsals with the ilud material below, and means to hold the containing means in position beneath the ball of the foot. f

12. In a shoe construction having an outsole, an upper and an insole, a platform interposed between the insole and the outsole and formed with a closed recess coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot and located in the region of the ball of the foot, and fluid means in said recess.

13. In a shoe construction having an outsole,

an upper and an insole, a platform interposed between the insole and outsole, a flexible flat closed casing at the rear of the platform beneath said insole and coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot and located in the region of the ball of the foot, and fluid means in said casing.

lll. In a shoe construction, a flexible closed casing disposed in a position to be engaged by the ball of the foot and coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot, said casing having a width substantially equal to the width of the shoe and terminating in its forward end rearwardly of the toe portion of the shoe, and a fluid means in said casing.

15. In a shoe construction, a flexible casing disposed in a position to be engaged by the ball of the foot and coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot, fluid means in said casing, ,and a forward toe portion extending from the forward end of said casing formed of non-distortable material.

16. In combination, a shoe including an insole-y a flexible closed casing in said insole in a position to be engaged by the ball of the foot and coinciding in area tothe :area in the region beneath the ball of the foot, and a fluid means in said casing.

17. A shoe insole for use with a shoe, said insole including a flexible casing in a position to be engaged by the ball of the foot and coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot, a fluid element in said casing and a non-distortable member carried by said insole extending forwardly from said casing and having a thickness substantially equal to the thickness of said casing and the normal thickness of said element.

18. In a shoe construction, a ilexible closed casing adapted tol be disposed within the shoe in a position to be engaged by the ball of the foot and coinciding in area to the area of the region beneath the ball of the foot, and displaceable liquid means within said casing movable therein under pressure of the metatarsal bones for equalizing the pressure of the foot on the forward ends of the metatarsal bones.

LAURIN FILARDO.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,193,608 Poulson Aug. 8, 1916 2,008,985 Latteman July 25, 1935 2,055,072 Everston Sept. 22, 1936 2,055,574 Hartl Sept. 29, 1936 2,174,473 Morcate Sept. 26, 1939 2,502,774 Alianiello Apr. 4, 1950 2,546,827 Lavinthal Mar. 27, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1193608 *Oct 26, 1915Aug 8, 1916 Insole
US2008985 *Sep 29, 1934Jul 23, 1935Lattemann EmilInner sole
US2055072 *Jan 26, 1935Sep 22, 1936Everston Joseph HCushion shoe
US2055574 *Nov 9, 1934Sep 29, 1936Josef MullerInsole
US2174473 *Jan 29, 1937Sep 26, 1939Angel MorcateVentilated filler sole
US2502774 *Dec 20, 1948Apr 4, 1950Alianiello NicholasCushioned shoe
US2546827 *Oct 2, 1948Mar 27, 1951Lavinthal AlbertArch supporting device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2760281 *Feb 17, 1954Aug 28, 1956Murray D CosinMoldable foot support
US3237319 *Jun 22, 1964Mar 1, 1966Hanson Alden WadeSki boots having a thixotropic material encircling the ankle portion thereof
US3402411 *Jan 12, 1966Sep 24, 1968Hanson Alden WadeProcess for making boots, sports equipment and hats
US3548420 *Mar 6, 1967Dec 22, 1970Stryker CorpCushion structure
US3721232 *May 24, 1968Mar 20, 1973Trenchard MSurgical pad method for decubitus ulcer management
US3765422 *Dec 27, 1971Oct 16, 1973Smith HFluid cushion podiatric insole
US3922801 *Jul 16, 1973Dec 2, 1975Zente Patrick ThomasLiquid filled orthopedic apparatus
US4250886 *Jun 26, 1979Feb 17, 1981Riso Rhea ROrthotic
US4843735 *Jun 12, 1987Jul 4, 1989Kabushiki Kaisha Cubic EngineeringShock absorbing type footwear
US5373650 *Dec 8, 1993Dec 20, 1994Langer Biomechanics Group, Inc.High-heeled shoe orthotic device
US5539020 *Jul 1, 1993Jul 23, 1996Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Method and device for cushioning limbs
US5922470 *May 26, 1995Jul 13, 1999Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Soft polysiloxanes having a pressure sensitive adhesive
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/153, 36/30.00A, 36/19.5, 36/44, 128/DIG.210, 623/37
International ClassificationA43B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/00, Y10S128/21
European ClassificationA43B7/00