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Publication numberUS2641451 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1953
Filing dateNov 4, 1950
Priority dateNov 4, 1950
Publication numberUS 2641451 A, US 2641451A, US-A-2641451, US2641451 A, US2641451A
InventorsKaiser Edward W
Original AssigneeKaiser Edward W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchanger
US 2641451 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1953 E. w. KAISER 2,641,451

HEAT EXCHANGER Filed Nov. 4, 1950 INVENTOR.

Eda/ma W/iaEe Z Patented June 9 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HEAT EXCHANGER Edward- Kaiser, Chicago, Ill.

Application November 4, 1950, Serial No, 194,173

4- Claims. 1

This invention relates, generally, to heat exchangers, and it has particular relation to such devices for maintaining a liquid in a tank and in a pipe connected thereto at an elevated temperature so as to maintain the contents thereof in the liquid state, which contents would be solid or viscous at room temperature.

Among the objects of this invention are: To circulate a heated fluid, such as steam or hot water, around the pipe through which the liquid flows from or to the tank in order to maintain not only such liquid but also the liquid in the tank at the elevated temperature; to direct the flow of the heated fluid so that it follows a circuitous path; to provide a relatively great surface Within the tank in contact with the liquid therein on the one hand and maintained at the elevated temperature on the other hand; to prevent intermingling between the liquid in the tank and pipe and the heated fluid; and to connect such a heat exchanger either to a jacketed or non-jacketed piping system.

Other objects of this invention will, in part, be obvious and in part appear hereinafter.

This invention is disclosed in the embodiments. thereof shown in the accompanying drawings and it comprises the features of construction, combination of elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the constructions hereinafter set forth and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the ap pended claims.

For a more complete understanding of thenature and scope of this invention, reference can be had to the following detailed" description, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a view, partly in side elevation and partly in section, illustrating one heat exchangerconstructed in accordance with this invention and applied to a tank the contents of which are to be maintained in the-liquid state;

Figure 2 is a view, similar to Figure 1, showing a modified form of the heat exchanger and how it can be adapted to be connected to a jacketed conduit system such as that disclosed in. my copending application Serial No. 47,851, filed September 4, 1948;

Figure 3 is a detail sectional view taken generally along the line 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a View, similar to Figure 2, illustrat ing how the heat exchanger of the present inven-.-

tion can be connected to a non-jacketed system. Referring now particularly to Figure 1 of the drawings, it will be observed that the referencecharacter In designates, generally, a tank, only a portion of which is shown, that may be adapt ed for receiving a liquid, such as wax, which is solid at room temperature and must. be main-- tained at an elevated temperature in order to keep it in the liquid state. It will be understood that other materials. which are similar in nature-v to wax may be received and heated in the tank: l0. It is. contemplated that viscous materialsalso may be used and that: they are. of such nature that they must be maintained at an ele vated temperature in order to permit them. to flow readily into orout of the: tank lat. One of. the tank walls is indicated: at. H; and it interfits with a shell l2 which may be. cylindrical. The wall I! and shell l2 may be secured. together in liquid tight. relation by any suitable means such as by welding l3..

In accordance. with this invention the. means; employed for maintaining the liquid in the. tank It in the liquid state is also. employed for main taining' the liquid in the inlet or outlet. pipe to.- the tank. H3 in. the liquid state. For this purpose a tank nipple I4 is employed and, as. shown, it comprises a. shortv length. of pipe; which, extends through a suitable aperture in the; wall M for a short. distance; The tank nipple I4; is. secured in fluid tight relation to the-wall, Ill" by welding- I5. The outer end of the tank nipple. His securedby welding 16. to a. radially extending flange H. The tank nipple l4. and flange l'1-, when arrangedas described, constitute an. integral; part: of: the. tank wall It. The remaining partsofi the heat, exchan r: constructed in accordance with this;

invention are; readily removable; from the. tank.

I0 in a manner which will be apparent presently.

In. order to. flow the liquid: into or out. of the tank I01 aninner pipe. Z'GisempIQved. Thepipe 20;. as illustrated; is; formed of. metal, such asi stainless. steel, steel, or; the like. At its inner. end it opens into the tank It andlisbelow the suriace. 0f the liquid therein. The inner pipejlliextendscentrally 0t thev tank nipple IA and: is; held, in spaced relation by means which will; beadescribed pre ently;

Surrounding the inner n ne. 2B -ar1d. ex ending a substantial distance into.- the; tank In; is: an outer; p pe. 2t. This. p pe, like. the: inner; pipe; 20 is; formed of metal such as s ainless, steel, steel or:

the. like... It. has a large. surfacewhich contac s the; liquid, irr the tank. .50- .and thus providesexcellent heat transfer medium. for. a. heated: fluid which is. circulated through it. Since. the outer pipe 21 and the. inner pipe 211 project into the; tank I 0; a substantial distance it. is desirable to; provide a support: therefor near the inner ends thereon For this purposeia pedestaliniisi emrployed. With a View to enclosing the inner end of the outer pipe 2| an annular plate 23 is employed. As indicated at 24 the plate 23 is welded to the outer surface of the inner pipe 20. The periphery of the plate 23 is welded by suitable means to the inner end of the outer pipe 2 I. The construction thus described provides an annular space 25 within the outer pipe 2| and around the inner pipe 20 through which a heated fluid, such as steam, can be circulated for the purpose not only of heating the liquid in the tank I but also for maintaining the liquid within the inner pipe 20 in the liquid state so that it will flow freely therethrough.

The outer pipe 2| extends centrally through the tank nipple l4 and through the flange I1 welded thereto. By means of welding 26 the outer pipe 2| is secured to a flange 21 which abuts the flange l1 and to which it is secured by suitable through bolts (not shown). It will be understood that a suitable gasket may be provided between the flanges I1 and 21 and between similar flanges described hereinafter in order to provide a fluid tight construction. It will be understood that the flange 2'| welded at 26 to the outer pipe 2| constitutes closure means for the outer end of the tank nipple I4 and between it and the outer pipe 2 I. This also constitutes a mechanical support for the outer end of the outer pipe 2 At its extreme outer end the outer pipe 2| is secured by welding 28 to a radial flange 29. Where the inner pipe 20 is not arranged to extend into a jacketed conduit system, means are provided here for making a, sealed connection between the inner pipe 20 and the outer pipe' 2|. For this purpose the flange 29 is secured, as by bolts, to another flange 30 which forms a part of a stuffing box that is indicated, generally, at 3|. The flange 30 and stuifing box 3| constitute closure means between the outer end of the outer pipe 2| and the portion of the inner pipe 20 that extends centrally therethrough.

As indicated hereinbefore the space 25 between the inner pipe 20 and the outer pipe 2| is arranged to be filled with a heated fluid. For this purpose an inlet conduit 32 and an outlet conduit 33 are connected to the outer pipe 2| between the flanges 21 and 29 as illustrated. Steam is caused to flow through the conduits 32 and 33 in the direction indicated by the arrows for circulating the heated fluid through the space 25 to heat the liquid in the tank I0 and also to maintain the liquid within the inner pipe 20 in the liquid state.

It will be understood that a heated fluid, such as steam, will completely fill the space 25. Under proper conditions heat will be extracted from the steam within the space 25 and it will condense so that the condensate will flow out through the conduit 33.

In Figure 2 of the drawings, a heat exchanger constructed generally similar to that shown in Figure l and described above is illustrated. In order to improve the circulation of the heated fluid between the inner pipe 20 and the outer pipe 2| in the space 25, there is provided an intermediate pipe 36. It will be observed that the intermediate pipe 36 is located between the inner pipe 20 and the outer pipe 2| and is concentric therewith. The intermediate pipe 36 projects through the outer end of the outer pipe 2| and through the nipple I4 which, in this instance, is provided with threads |6 for receiving the flange IT. The intermediate pipe 36 is secured by welding 31 to a flange 30' which, as described hereinbefore, may be secured to the flange 29 by suitable bolts. The flange 30 constitutes a closure means between the outer pipe 2| and the intermediate pipe 36. It will be observed that the inner end of the intermediate pipe 36 is spaced, as indicated at 38, from the extreme inner end of the outer pipe 2| or the plate 23. The space 38 permits the circulation of the heated fluid from the inside of the intermediate pipe 36 where it is in intimate contact with the outside of the inner pipe 2|! to the outside thereof and in intimate contact with the inner surface of the outer pipe 2|. It is noted here that the plate 23 is secured about its outer periphery by welding 24' to the inner end of the outer pipe 2|. Also it will be noted that the flange 29 is secured by threads 28' onto the outer end of the outer pipe 2| At its extreme outer end the intermediate pipe 36 is secured by welding 39 to a flange 40. It is desirable to seal off the space between the outer end of the intermediate pipe 36 and the outer surface of the inner pipe 20. For this purpose a plate 4| is employed. As shown more clearly in Figure 3 the plate 4| has a relatively close fit with the outer surface of the inner pipe 20 although preferably it is not securely attached thereto. The sliding fit thus provided serves to contain the heated fluid which is circulated through the inlet and outlet conduits 32 and 33 to the intermediate pipe 35. It is here noted that the inlet conduit 32 is connected to the intermediate pipe 36 while the outlet conduit 33 remains connected to the outer pipe 2|. Thus the heated fluid flows into the intermediate pipe 36 and around the exterior of the inner pipe 2|]. It flows through the space 38 and into the portion of the space 25 outside of the intermediate pipe 36 and thence to the outlet conduit 33.

It will be noted that the plate 4|, which is apertured centrally to receive the inner pipe 20, is clamped between the flange 40 and a flange 42 that is secured by welding 43' to one end of a jacket 44. The jacket 44 constitutes a part of a jacketed conduit system the details of which are set forth more completely in the copending application above referred to. For present purposes it is merely pointed out that the jacket 44 is spaced from the inner pipe 2|] so as to provide an annular space 45 therearound through which a heated fluid, such as steam or hot water, can be circulatedfor maintaining the liquid within the inner pipe 20 in the liquid state. A conduit 46 may be connected to the jacket 44 to form a part of the heated fluid circulating system. The heat exchanger illustrated in Figure 4 is generally similar to that illustrated in Figure 2 and described above. It differs in that the threaded connections H5 and 28' are not employed and welding is substituted therefor. Another distinction is that the stufling box 3| described above in connection with Figure 1 is employed, since the inner pipe 2|] in this modification does not extend into a jacketed conduit system.

In the heat exchangers shown in Figures 1, 2 and 4 the inner pipe 2|l is anchored by the plate 23 to the adjacent inner end of the outer pipe 2|. The outer end of the outer pipe 2| is anchored through the flanges 21 and I! and the pipe nipple l4 or M to the wall'||. Thus the outer pipe 2| expands inwardly of the tank I0 and carries with it the inner pipe 20-. The latter is free to move at its outer end since it extends through the which it is slidable.

When the intermediate pipe 36 is employed, as

shown in Figures 2 and 4 to provide a counter-' flow of the heating medium through the outer pipe 2| and around the inner pipe 20, the intermediate pipe 36 is anchored at its outer end to the wall H while its inner end is free to expand inwardly of the tank In. This construction permits independent expansion and contraction of the pipes 2B, 2! and 36 on change in temperature While maintaining fluid tight the connections therebetween and with the tank I ll. The heating medium from the inlet pipe 32 first contacts the inner pipe 20 and, While flowing through the intermediate pipe 36, transfers some of the heat in it to the liquid in the inner pipe 29. During its counterflow between the intermediate pipe 33 and the outer pipe 21 additional heat is removed from the heating medium and is transferred to the surrounding liquid in the tank In.

Since certain further changes can be made in the foregoing constructions and different embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, it is intended that all matter shown in the accompanying drawings and described hereinbefore shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed as new is:

1. For combination with a tank containing a liquid to be maintained at an elevated temperature, a tank nipple for connection to a wall of the tank, an inner pipe extending through said tank nipple and opening into the tank through which the liquid therein can flow, an outer pipe extending through and having sealed connection to said tank nipple and surrounding and spaced from said inner pipe, an intermediate pipe extending into and having sealed connection to said outer pipe outside of said tank nipple, said intermediate pipe being spaced from said inner and outer pipes and constituting a battle in the space therebetween, closure means within the tank between said outer and inner pipes, closure means without said tank between said intermediate an inner pipes, and conduit means connected to said outer and intermediate pipes without the tank for circulating through said space between said inner and outer pipes as directed by said baflie a heated fluid for maintaining the liquid in the tank and in said inner pipe at the elevated temperature.

2. For combination with a tank containing a liquid to be maintained at an elevated temperature, a tank nipple for connection to a wall of the tank, an inner pipe extending through said tank nipple into the tank for a substantial distance and opening into the same through which the liquid therein can flow, an outer pipe having sealed connection to and extending through said tank nipple and into said tank where a substantial portion of its outer surface contacts the liquid therein, said outer pipe surrounding and spaced from said inner pipe, an intermediate pipe extending into and having sealed connection to said outer pipe outside of said tank nipple, said intermediate pipe being spaced from said inner and outer pipes and constituting a bafiie in the space therebetween, closure means within the tank between said outer and inner pipes, closure means without said tank between said intermediate and inner pipes, and conduit means connected to said outer and intermediate pipes without the tank for circulating through said space between said inner and outer pipes as directed by said baflle a heated fluid for maintaining the liquid in the tank and in said inner pipe at the elevated temperature.

3. For combination with a tank containing a liquid to be maintained at an elevated temperature, a tank nipple for connection to and extending through a wall of the tank, an inner pipe extending centrally through said tank nipple into the tank for a substantial distance and opening into the same through which the liquid therein can flow, an outer pipe spaced centrally from and having sealed connection to said tank nipple and extending into said tank Where a substantial portion of its outer surface contacts the liquid therein, said outer pipe surrounding and spaced from said inner pipe, an intermediate pipe extending into and having sealed connection to said outer pipe outside of said tank nipple, said intermediate pipe being spaced from said inner and outer pipes and constituting a baffle in the space therebetween, closure means within the tank between said outer and inner pipes, closure means without said tank between said intermediate and inner pipes, and conduit means connected to said outer and intermediate pipes without the tank for circulating through said space between said inner and outer pipes as directed by said baffle a heated fluid for maintaining the liquid in the tank and in said inner pipe at the elevated temperature.

4. For combination with a tank containing a liquid to be maintained at an elevated temperature, a tank nipple for connection to a wall of the tank, an inner pipe extending through said tank nipple and opening into the tank through which the liquid therein can flow, an outer pipe extending through and having sealed connection to said tank nipple and surrounding and spaced from said inner pipe, an intermediate pipe extend into and having sealed connection to said outer pipe outside of said tank nipple, said intermediate pipe being spaced from said inner and outer pipes and constituting a baflle in the space therebetween, closure means within the tank between said outer and inner pipes, closure means without said tank between said intermediate and inner pipes, conduit means connected to said outer and intermediate pipes without the tank for circulating through said space between said inner and outer pipes as directed by said bafile a heated fluid for maintaining the liquid in the tank and in said inner pipe at the elevated temperaturmet surrounding and spaced from said inner pipe and extending from said closure means between said intermediate and inner pipes, and conduit means connected to said jacket for circulating through the space between it and said inner pipe a heated fluid for maintaining the liquid in said inner pipe at an elevated temperature.

EDWARD W. KAISER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,251,801 Merrill Jan. 1 1918 1,723,082 Schumann Aug. 6, 1929 1,727,659 McBride Sept. 10, 1929 1,727,694 Beyer Sept. 10, 1929 1,801,693 Rufi' Apr. 21, 1931 1,832,412 Newton Nov. 17 1931 2,376,373 Merckel May 22, 1945 2,517,821 Allen Aug. 8, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 624,816 Germany Jan. 17, 1934

Patent Citations
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US1723082 *Nov 23, 1927Aug 6, 1929Hauck Mfg CoLiquid-heating apparatus
US1727659 *Jul 14, 1927Sep 10, 1929American Car & Foundry CoDischarge outlet
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US1801693 *Aug 23, 1929Apr 21, 1931York Ice Machinery CorpHeat exchanger
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US2376373 *Jul 26, 1940May 22, 1945Novadel Agene CorpBrew cooling
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2800367 *Nov 29, 1954Jul 23, 1957California Research CorpNozzle assembly
US4129178 *Jul 19, 1976Dec 12, 1978Hans HuckeHeat exchange installation for heating and cooling a liquid heat carrier medium
US4926830 *Feb 3, 1989May 22, 1990Mcnelley Jerald RMounted fuel tank heater
US5029634 *Jan 22, 1990Jul 9, 1991Hurner Erwin EIntank fuel heater
US5215144 *Feb 18, 1992Jun 1, 1993Siemens AktiengesellschaftHeat exchanger
US5423373 *Jan 19, 1994Jun 13, 1995Arctic Fox Heaters, Inc.Bypass device for reservoir and intake conduit heating of power fluids
US5611392 *Feb 1, 1993Mar 18, 1997Arctic Fox Heaters, Inc.Power fluid heating system
US20090314021 *Jul 5, 2007Dec 24, 2009Omega Refrigeration (Proprietary) LimitedSupermarket refrigerator
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/142, 126/343.50A, 165/109.1, 165/132, 138/32
International ClassificationF28D7/10, F28D7/12
Cooperative ClassificationF28D7/12
European ClassificationF28D7/12