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Publication numberUS2642825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1953
Filing dateNov 1, 1951
Priority dateNov 1, 1951
Publication numberUS 2642825 A, US 2642825A, US-A-2642825, US2642825 A, US2642825A
InventorsJones Thomas G, Mcelhone Charles A
Original AssigneeCopco Steel And Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foldable and compactable truss and stud support
US 2642825 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1953 C. A. MCELHONE mu.

FOLDABLE AND COIIPACTABLE TRUSS AND STUD SliPPORT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 1, 1951 l2 l2 3 2 I I0 44 as [a 36 4 as \g 36 l {22 {22 P 22 r! i I} I i ii i? I i: i- .i' 1| i L1 L1 I INVENTORS CHARLIES A. MCLHONE.. 3; THoMAs G. JONES AIME! June 23, 1953 McELHQNE ETAL V 2,642,825

FOLDABLE Ann coumcwsu: muss AND s'run SUPPORT a 2 Sheet-Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 1, 1951 Fla. 6.

' INVENTORS 54 CHARLES A. MCfLHONE 8 7710M G. dolvzs IUDRNCX Patented June 23, 1953 FOLDABLE AND COMPACTABLE TRUSS AND STUD SUPPORT Charles A. McElhone, Allen Park, and Thomas G. Jones, Detroit, Mich., assignors to 'Copco Steel and Engineering Company,Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application November 1, 1951, Serial No. 254,340

Thi invention relates to a building construction in which the framing for walls and roof consist of metal roof trusses and supportstudding that are combined in a novel and inventive manner, the unitary character of the combination being maintained from the time of factory prefabrication through to final erection and installation.

Metal or steel building construction generally follows the course of factory prefabrication and field erection. Planning and organizing the elements and subcombinations made in the factory for simplified field assembly are the bases for low-cost construction.

Simplicity of attachment for the component elements of a roof truss and stud support form the outline of this invention. Most metal elements can be joined by metal screws, bolts and nuts, welding, soldering, and numerous other devices and methods. In each case, the choice is governed by the efficiency of the construction. If the cost of time consumed in field assembly outweighs the savings in factory prefabrication, an adjustment must be made. If factory prefabrication costs, for material, labor or both, overbalance the cost of field erection to a degree that indicates inefficient sub-assembly units are responsible, then a revision of methods and assemblies is required to obtain maximum total efiiciency.

One of the best methods of obtaining such efficiency is by the development of sub-assembly units for building construction that require only unit assembly components in the field. And this is further improved by having the components identical in size and shape or as much so as possible. For instance, if the construction assembly is completed by means of a pin, it is more efficient to require only one or two sizes of pins than three or more sizes. This is the situation in the instant invention. The roof truss-has been designed to require an absolute minlmum of assembly parts in the field, and these parts are identical in character and shape with a mini- 10 Claims. (Cl. 108-23) fabricate and to erect on a field site.

rangements, loading, unloading, and handling at the field site.

' Therefore, it is an object of the invention to provide a factory prefabricated roof truss and stud support sub-assembly which is simple to Another object is the provision of such a sub-assembly requiring a minimum of connection elements of identical character and shape, with a minimum of size variation. Further, it is an object to provide a prefabricated sub-assembly that is foldable and compactable into a minimum cubic space for handling and transportation. A further object is the ease and simplicity of comstallation at the field site.

mum of size variation. The connection elements are the same for joining the truss and stud supconstruction lies in its ability to b compacted and transported in a minimum of space. This element of the invention is referred to as the cube of the construction. When the subassembly of the building construction invention M pacting the sub-assembly, and of unfolding and arranging the sub-assembly for erection and in- Still another object is the achievement of substantially lower costs in construction and field erection. These and other objects f will appear in the description given below. I

The description together with the appended drawing is a disclosure of some forms which the inventionmay take, a.nd is not in any way in tended to be a limitation of the forms or variations which persons skilled in th art may make.

The terms used are for purpose of description, and not of limitation.

Referring now to the drawing annexed hereto and made an integral part of this specification, A Fig.'-]. is a perspective view of a portion of a roof framing structure, showing two, roof trusses lstud supports shown in Fig. 1.

supported on studding and held together 'by purlins.

.. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a roof truss "and Fig. 3 is a plan view of one truss top chor section, showing connected purlins.

Fig. 4 is a partially diagrammatic side elevation of one side of the roof truss and stud sup- ;port sub-assembly, indicating the first steps in compacting the same for transportation or handling.

' Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the inventive subassembly and shows the truss and stud supports in the second stage of compacting.

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the inventive subassembly showing the same in fully compacted form.

Fig. 7 is an end view of the compacted inven- -tive sub-assembly taken from the left side of J Fig. 6.

lication i arranged for shipment from of thls app and compression members with the chord elements. 7

inventive sub-assembly is such that it can be Fig. 8 i a sectional view on the line 88 of Fig. 6, showing the folded arrangement of tension The roof truss and stud support combination I0 of this invention consists of top chords l2, hanmed by a single workman for shipping ar 0 bottom chords ll, stud supports it, tension 3 members l3, compression members 20, and purllns 22.

The top chords I2, bottom chords I4, stud supports I6, and purlins 22 are C-section structurals made of metal and. preferably of easily formable sheet metal gages. Th c-section structural comprises a web 26, parallel sides 28 at right angles to said web, and inturned flanges 38 parallel to web 26. The tension and compression members, I8 and respectively, comprise channels of easily formable sheet metal in which a flat channel web 32 is formed between a pair of unidirectional parallel sides 34.

Each roof truss consists of a pair of bottom chords I4, of the same shape and size, arranged in line, their webs 26 lying co-planar, and joined together with hinges 36. The hinges 36 are standard leaf type hinges, and consist of a pair of leaves 38 having intermeshing knuckles 40 held together by a pin 42, which may be headed or straight. A pair of hinges 36 are attached to the bottom chords I4 at the center of the truss span, by afflxing one hinge leaf 38 to the web 26 of one of the chords I4 and the other hinge leaf 38 to the web 26 of the other chord I4 so that the hinge knuckles 40 intermesh and are held together by pin 42. oppositely at the center of the bottom chord span, a leaf hinge 36 is attached by affixing hinge leaves 38 to the inturned flanges of each bottom chord I4 so that the hinge knuckles intermesh and are held by pin 42.

The two top chords I2 are similarly joined by leaf hinges 36 at the center of the truss span, one hinge being affixed to the web sides of the chords I2 at the mitred peak, another to the inturned flange sides of the chords, at the line where the two chords abut and directly opposite the first described hinge. The hinges 36 on each side of the top and bottom chords, when the truss is in load supporting position, should have their pins 42 in parallel alignment, for the purposes to be described below.

At each end of the truss span, a stop 44 is affixed at the end of the bottom. chords I4 on the upper chord side 28. The stop 44 consists of a flat piece of substantially thick metal, preferably rectangular in shape and of a size to come within the width of the chord side 28, so that there is no overhang. The stop 44 is spot welded to the chord side 28, and acts to restrain linear movement or drift of the top chords I2 off the bottom chords l4. The ends of top chords I2 abut and rest against the restraining stops 44 at each end of the truss span.

At each span end, a leaf hinge 36 is affixed to the lower top chord side 28 and the upper bottom chord side 28, to provide a connection for and vertical swing between top and bottom chords. The hinge 36 at this point is set inwardly from the extremity of lower chord I4 and slightly inward from the extremity of top chord I2. The hinge could be arranged at the very ends of the two connected chords, if desired; however, load bearing factors and construction efiiciency is improved by setting the hinge slightly inward from the extremities of the chords at the span ends.

Tension members I8 are attached to and between the top chords I2 and bottom chords I4, by affixing a leaf hinge 36 to the lower side 28 of the top chord, near the truss peak, and to the channel web 32 at the upper end of the tension member I8, and a second leaf hinge 36 to the upper side 28 of the bottom chord and to the channel web 32 at the lower end of the tension member. The pins 42 of the hinges so aiiixed lie parallel horizontally at each end of the tension member. Similarly connected are the compression members 20, with leaf hinges 36 aflixed at each end thereof and to the lower side 28 of the top chords I2 and the upper side of the bottom chords I4. The hinge leaves 38 affixed to compression members 20 and tension members I8 are attached to the inside surface of the channel web 32. This construction makes for better compacting of the elements.

Purlins 22 formed of C-section structurals are used to connect the roof trusses together in load bearing relation. To provide a means of connection which is simple and inexpensive, leaf hinges 36 are affixed to both web and inturned flange sides of the top chords I2 and to abutting purlin webs 26. These particular hinges 36 are arranged with loose pins 42 so that purlin assembly to and disassembly from the truss top chords is achieved with a minimum of effort and time. The pins 42 are inserted within the loops of hinge knuckles 40 to join purlins 22 to top chords I2, and removed for disassembly.

Stud supports I6 formed of C-section structurals are joined to the roof truss at each end of the bottom chords. A leaf hinge 36 is afllxed to the lower side 28 of bottom chord I4, near the span end, and to the inner parallel side 28 of the stud IS. A second hinge 36 is aflixed to the inside surface of the lower side 28 of the bottom chord, at its very extremity, and to the outer parallel side 28 of the stud I6. This latter hinge, with its pin 42 lying horizontally, protrudes beyond the end of the truss in order that the connection be D P- r erly made between bottom chord I4 and stud support 'I 6, whose supporting end lies directly against and underneath the lower side 28 of the bottom chord, for maximum load bearing eifect. The hinge pin 42 lies just beyond the extremity of the bottom chord I4 to permit the depending hinge leaf 38 to be affixed to the stud support I6.

The leaf hinges 36 used to connect the various elements of the roof truss and stud support combination ID as previously described consist of a pair of leaves 38, each leaf having intermeshing knuckles 40, and a joining pin 42 that is held within the knuckles 40. The hinge leaves 38 rotate about the pin 42, which serves as a pivot or fulcrum. The pins 42 can be headed and loose or straight and fast. A loose pin is one that is easily removable from the knuckles, a fast pin being firmly anchored in the knuckles and not easily removable.

In the inventive construction above described, some of the hinge pins are loose and some are fast. The purpose of such arrangement is to provide a roof truss and stud support combination that is at once an integral unit and also a collapsible, foldable and compactable unit. The hinge connections of this unit permit simple and facile compacting and accurate alignment of the elements into a load bearing component.

These objects are accomplished as follows. Starting at the truss peak, the hinge 36 on the inturned flanged side of top chords I2 is a loose pin hinge, the oppostie hinge having a fast pin. Central of the truss span at the bottom chords I4, the hinge 36 on the inturned flange side has a loose pin, the hinge opposite on the web side having a fast pin. By removing the loose pins 42 from hinges 36 on the inturned flange side of the truss, top and bottom chords are rotatable about the hinges 36 afiixed to the web sides 26 thereof at the center of the truss span until the truss ends meet.

The tension members l8 are held by loose pin hinges 36 to top chords I2, and by fast pin hinges to bottom chords I4. By removing the loose pins 42, and deflecting the top chords I2, the tension members I8 are rotatable about the fast pin hinges 36 on the bottom chords l4, until they rest upon the upper sides 28 of the bottom chords I4. Similarly, the hinges 36 by which the lower end of the compression members 28 are connected to the bottom chords I4, are loose pin hinges; those connecting the compression members 20 to the top chords I2 being fast pin hinges. Removing the hinge pins 42 at the lower end ofthe compression members 28 permits them to be rotated upward to rest against the lower parallel side 28 of the top chords I2.

The hinges 36 lying at the truss ends between top and bottom chords, I2 and I4 respectively, are both fast pin hinges. The top chords I 2, lying parallel to each other and with compression members 28 tucked up under and around (Fig. 5), can be lowered on the outer horizontally I positioned hinges 36 to rest upon the tension members l8 and bottom chords I4. It should be noted that greater compactness is achieved if the channel web 32, of the tension and compression members, I8 and 20 respectively, is as wide or slightly wider than the chord sides 28. By being thus dimensioned, the members l8 and 20 will slip easily over and flatly against the chords I2 and I4, in this Way requiring a minimum of waste space between the folded chords. Only the hinge knuckles 48 will lie between the compacted elements of the truss.

The stud supports I6 at each end of the truss have fast pin hinges 36 affixed inwardly of the ends of the bottom chords I4, the hinge 36 at the very extremities of the truss being loose pin in character. By removing the loose pins 42 from the outermost hinges, the studs I6 can swing inwardly and upward toward and against the bottom chords I l.

In order further to achieve compactness and reduce cubic content of the folded combination I8, it should. be noted that by using a three knuckle hinge leaf 38 on the Web side of the top chord l2 for one half of the truss and a two knuckle hinge leaf 38 on the web side of the 6 sion members I8 about their hinges on the bottom chords, deflecting the top chords to allow them to pass and connect members I8 to the top chords by inserting pin 42 into the intermeshed hinge leaves. Rotate the compression members '20 downwardly until the afiixed hinge leaves 38 at the end of the members ZOintermesh with the leaves 38 on the bottom chords and connect with pins 42. Swing stud supports I6 downward until in right angle relation to bottom chords II, with extreme hinge leaves 38 intermeshing and connect with pins 42 at each end of the truss span. I

By virtue of infolding tension and compression members against folding chords, studs and inter tant or involved, efiicient loading is still highly desirable in order to get the most goods per to their destination.

The method of afiixing the leaf hinges 36 is optional, a preferred method being to spot weld the leaves 38 to the parts as described. The usual practice is to disassemble the hinge 36 by removing the pin 42 from the knuckles 40, spot welding each leaf 38 to its appropriatesite and reassembling the elements by intermeshing the knuckles and inserting the pin therewithin. However, spot welding is not the only means of affixing the hinges 36. Tack welding, arc welding, nuts and bolts, metal self-tapping screws, rivets and numerous other fasteners and fastening means may be employed. Also, it should be clearly understood that when the attachment of trip , a hinge 36 to two components of combination other top chord, and'by spacing them equidi'stant from the truss peak, the knuckles of both hinge leaves will intermesh as the top chords are folded back to back.

To achieve further standardization and interchangeability, the hinge leaves 38 on the inturned flange sides of topchords I2 can be complementary to the hinge leaves directly opposite on the web side of the same chords. Thus, it does not matter whether the trusses all face the same way or not, the purlin connections are identical. Each purlin 22 has a three knuckle hinge leaf 38 attached to one end and a two knuckle hinge leaf 38 affixed to its other end. This arrangement simplifies the construction, assembly and cooperation of the roof trusses, in that skilled labor is not required and accuracy of assembly is practically positive.

To place a folded roof truss and stud support combination I0 in use, a preferred method is here described. Swing the top chords I2 upward and away from bottom chords I4, rotating them about the truss center axis until the hinge leaves on the inturned flange sides of the top and bottom chords at the truss center axis intermesh. Insert pins 42 in the hinge knuckles at the peak and at the bottom chord span center.

Rotate the ten- J5 axis. Y I Having described ourinvention in its very simplest' terms, it is to be understood that the details I0 is described, that a'hingeleaf 38 is aflixed to each of the components so that'a swinging or rotating relation'is established between the two components about ."We claim: 55

1. In combination, a foldable and com'pactable roof truss consisting of top chords hingedly connected at thetruss peak, bottom chords hingedly connected at the center of the truss span, the truss endsof each of said top chords hingedly connected to the truss ends of each of said bottom chords, compression members hingedly connected to top and bottom chords, and tension members hingedly connected to top and bottom chords.

2. The roof truss of claim 1, and including supporting studs hingedly connected at each end of said roof truss so as to swing and move toward said bottom chord sections.

3. The roof truss of claiml, and including sup-,

porting studs connected 'at the truss span exthe hinge'pin 42 as a pivoting I 7 of :said hinges being affixed to the extremity of said bottom chordsectionand to the outermost side of the'said supporting stud.

4. A foldable and compactable roof-truss including C-sectionstructurals made of sheet metal and consisting of top chord and bottom chord sections hingedly connected, the top chord sections abutting each other at the truss peak being joined by hinges aflixed across the top chords with hingepins in a vertical position, theibottom chord sections abutting each other at the truss span center being joined by hinges afiixed across the bottom chords with hinge pins in a vertical position, the connection between top and bottom chords at the truss span ends being achieved by hingesafiixed to the top and bottom chord sections there contiguous with'hinge pins in a horizontal position.

5. A foldable roof truss assembly in which the truss chord sections are composed of C-section structurals and consisting of top chord and bottom chord sections hingedly connected, the top chord sections abutting at the truss peak having hinges there affixed connecting the said top chord sections to provide movement relative to each other and rotation about a vertical pivot, the bottom chord sections having hinges affixed at the truss span center and connecting the said bottom chord sections to provide movement relative to each other and rotation about a vertical pivot, the ends of said top and bottom chords at the truss span extremities being connected in load bearing relation, the said pivotsof top and bottom chord sections at the truss spancenter being arranged in alignment to provide folding of said truss in two segments into a folded unit.

6. A foldable and compactable roof truss in which the truss chord sections are composed of sheet metal structurals and .consisting of 'top chord sections abutting at the truss peak being connected by a pair of hinges mounted on abutting top chord sections, the pair of hinges being affixed opposite each other, each of said hinges connecting the top chord sections, with the pins of said pair of hinges arranged in parallel vertical position, one of said pins being fast in its hinge while the other hinge pin is loose and easily removable, bottom chord sections abutting at the truss .spancenter and'b'eing connected by a pair of hinges-mounted on abutting bottom chord sections, these hinges beingaffixed opposite each other, with each of said hinges connecting the bottom chord sections and arranged with hinge pins in parallel vertical position, one of said latter pins being fast in its hinge while the other of said latter pins is loose and easily removable, the truss span ends of said top and .bottom chord sections being connected in load bearing relation, the said roof truss being foldable about a vertical pivoting axis of the fast hinge pins at the truss peak and truss span center of the bottom chord after removal of the loose hinge pins from the same locations.

7. A foldable and compactable roof truss consisting of top chord sections abutting at the truss peak and being there connected by a pair of hinges opposedly affixed to two sides at the truss peak and connecting the abutting top chord sections, the pins of said hinges being arranged in parallel vertical position, bottom chord section-s abutting at the center of the truss span and being there connected by a pair of hinges opposedly positioned and affixed to two sides of the bottom chord sections and connecting said bottom chord sections, the hinge pins on one side of said roof truss beingfast-initheir hinges, theihinge pins on the opposed side of said roof truss being loose and removable in their hinges, the top and bottom chord sections at the truss span ends being connected by hinges aflixed to the top and bottom chord sections and positioned with their hinge pins lying horizontally between the top and bottomchord sections.

.8. .A compactable and foldable roof truss consisting of top chord sections hinged horizontally to bottom chord sections at the truss span extremities, the said top chord sections connected at the truss peak by hinges vertically arranged and opposedly affixed on each side of the trus peak, and said bottom chord sections connected at the truss span center by hinges vertically arranged and opposedly affixed on each side of the truss span center.

9. Incombination, a foldable and compactable roof truss consisting of top chords hingcdly connected at the truss peak, bottom chords hingedly connected at the center of the truss ends of each of said top chords hingedly connected to the truss ends of each of said bottom chords, compression members hingedly connected to top and bottom chords, and tension members hingedly connected to top and bottom chords, and sup porting studs connected at the truss span extremities to the lower side of said bottom chord sections by hinges, one of said hinges bei mounted inwardly of the extremity of the truss span and connecting said supporting stud to the lower side of said bottom chord section, the other of said hinges being affixed to the extremity of said bottomchord section and to the outermost sideof the said supporting stud, wherein the connecting hinges for each supporting stud at the truss spancxtremities consist of a fast pin hinge inwardly of the said extremity connecting the said bottom chord section to said supporting stud and a loose and removable pin hinge at the extremity of the truss span connecting the eX- :tremit y of the said bottom chord section to the bottom chord sections to provide movement relative to each other and rotation about a vertical pivot, the ends of said top and bottom. chords at the truss span extremities being connected in load bearing relation, the said pivots of top and bottom chord sections at the truss span center being arranged in alignment to provide folding ,of said truss in two segments into a folded unit,

and hinge leaves for connection to purlins affixed with complementary hinge leaves, said first hinge leaves being affixedto the sides of said top chord sections.

CHARLES A. MCELHONE. THOMAS G. JONES.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 'Number Name Date 2,325,747 Dailey Aug. 3, 1943 2,386,077 Van Norman Oct. 2, 1945 2,549,816 Johnson Apr. 24, 1951

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US2386077 *Apr 1, 1944Oct 2, 1945Norman Charles Burwell KerrinsCollapsible roof unit
US2549816 *Apr 24, 1946Apr 24, 1951Hugh B JohnsonPortable shelter
Referenced by
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US2847722 *Jan 22, 1954Aug 19, 1958Wedeking Fred ETheatrical shade for enclosing an outdoor movie screen
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US2988854 *Apr 7, 1958Jun 20, 1961Pagebar IncWooden joint coupling including nail clinching means
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US8640392 *Oct 9, 2008Feb 4, 2014Hobart Brothers CompanyStructural display having adjustable mounting widths for use in a retail environment
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/641
International ClassificationE04B1/344
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/3441
European ClassificationE04B1/344B