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Publication numberUS2643866 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1953
Filing dateFeb 15, 1946
Priority dateFeb 15, 1946
Publication numberUS 2643866 A, US 2643866A, US-A-2643866, US2643866 A, US2643866A
InventorsPaul Kollsman
Original AssigneePaul Kollsman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dispensing carbonated beverages
US 2643866 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1953 P.V KO I LSMAN APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CARBONATED BEVERAGES Filed Feb. 15, 19 16 5 Shets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR PAUL KOLLSMAN BY won!- (144 ATTORNEY June 30, 1953 P KQLLSMAN APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CARBONATED BEVERAGES 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 15, 1946 M 3 n M E um L P. KOLLSMAN June 30, 1953 APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CARBONATED BEVERAGES Filed Feb. 15, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR 'PA UL KOLLSMA/V ATTORNEY Patented June 30, 1953 APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING CARBON- ATED BEVERAGES Paul Kollsman, New York, N. Y.

Application February 15, 1946, Serial No. 647,805

This invention provides an apparatus for dispensing measured quantities of carbonated beverages.

Conventional handling and dispensing of carbonated beverages usually involves storage of the charged beverage under pressure and dispensing or feeding of the beverage into acup or measuring vessel under turbulence accompanied by a substantial drop in pressure whereby a considerable portion of the carbon dioxide charge is driven out. As a result the beverage reaching the consumer has lost much of its eifervescence.

According to the present invention the car bonated beverage is maintained under pressure throughout its handling and measuring and the carbon dioxide pressure is only relieved at the final dispensing stage after the beverage has assumed a quiescent state, whereafter itis poured or dispensed at a controlled low rate of flow to maintain turbulence of the liquid low whereby greatest possible charge of carbon dioxide is retained in the beverage. t

The objects, features and advantages of this invention will appear more fully from the detailed description which follows accompanied by drawings showing for the purpose of illustration apparatus for practicing the invention.

The-invention also consists in certain new and original features of construction and combination of parts as well as in a certain combination of steps hereinafter set forth and claimed.

Although the characteristic features of this invention which are believed to be novel will be particularly pointed out in the claims appendedhereto, the invention itself, its objects and ad-- vantages, and the manner in which it may be carried outmay be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof in which:

.Fig. 1 is an elevational view, partly in section of a coin operated machine for dispensing a measured quantity of beverage carbonated in the machine proper;

Fig. 2 is a detailed view of a valve assembly of the machine of Fig. 1; V

Fig. 3 is modified actuating mechanism for the machine illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 shows the actuating mechanism of Fig. 3 in a different adjustment;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view, partly in section, of another form of machine embodying the invention;

Fig. 6 is a detailed plan view of an actuating and valve mechanism of. the machine of Fig. 5; and

10 Claims. (01. 261-76) Fig. '7 is a sectional view of a valve shown in Fig. 6 the section being taken on line l-i of Fig. 6.

In the following description and in the claims.

details may be modified in various respects without departure from the principles of this invention and that the invention may be applied to other structures than the ones shown.

The carbonating and dispensing apparatus shown in Fig. 1 comprises a housing I! having a base I2 upon which the housing rests. The housing provides a cylinder l3 in-which a piston I4 is movable dividing the cylinder space into a a beverage chamber 15 and a pumping chamber [(5.

The beverage chamber [5 has a discharge valve l1 controlling a discharge passage l8 leading to a dispensing spout IS.

The pumping chamber [6 is provided with an inlet check valve 20 controlling an inlet duct or passage 2! leadingto a suitable source or reservoir of beverage (not shown). The inlet valve 20 is biased by a spring 22 normally maintaining the valve closed, but permitting opening of the valve in response to suction in the pumping chamber l6.

An outlet valve 23 biased by a spring 26 controls a passage consisting of a series of ducts 25, 26, 21 and 28 leading to the beverage chamber I5 controlled further by an admission valve 29 between the ducts 2'! and 28.

A supply duct 36 of carbon dioxide coming from a suitable source of carbon dioxide under pressure is connected to the passage between the pumping and the beverage chamber to introduce carbon dioxide into allow of liquid flowing from the pumping chamber to the beverage chamber, turbulence and intimate intermixing of the gas and liquid being promoted by a constriction 3! in the duct 26.

The outlet valve 23 is normally held closed by a spring 24 permitting opening of the valve in response to pressure in the pumping chamber which forces liquid through the passages 25, 25,

2'! and 28 into the beverage chamber i5. The piston M has a tubular extension 32 fitting in a tubular space 33 between a cylindrical inner The names, however,

r by screws 38.

wall 34 and a central post 35 in the housing ll. The central post 35 is axially adjustable in the tubular space 33 and is held by a nut 35 engaging threads 31 at the bottom end of the post, the nut being secured to the base 12 of the housing The post 35 has an intermediate cylindrical portion 39 tightly fitting against the cylindrical inner wall sealed by an appropriate packing 40.

Carbon dioxide under pressure is admitted into the tubular space 33 through a passage comprising ducts 4! and 42 coming from a control valve assembly later to be described. Pressure in the tubular space 33 causes the tubular extension 32 of the piston 14 to move upwardly, in piston fashion, thereby moving the main piston l 4 which divides the beverage chamber lfrom the-pumping chamber 16 causing decrease of the volume of the beverage chamber and increase of the volume of the pumping chamber.

A secondary pumping chamber 43 is' formed above the central post 35 by the central bore of the extension 32 of the piston and the post proper. The secondary pumping chamber communicates with the beverage chamber 15 through an outlet check valve 44 normally closed by a biasing spring 45. An intake check valve 43 normally held closed by a biasing spring 41 controls an intake passage consisting of ducts' lfi and 49 leading to a source (not shown) of flavoring liquid, for example, syrup.

A bypass duct 50 extends across the intake valve 45 and leads to a port 5| which may be closed by a control edge 52 on the inner wall of the tubular extension 32 after the tubular extension 32 has moved a certain distance relatively to the stationary post 35.

The discharge valve I! and the admission valve 29 are both automatically controlled by pressure fluid operable servo-motors. The servo-motor for the discharge valve l7 comprises a servopiston 53 movable in a servo-cylinder 54 and subdividing the cylinder space into chambers 55' and 56. The chamber 55 is vented to the atmosphere through a passage 5! while chamber 55 is supplied with fluid under pressure at appropriate times from a branch duct 58 communicating with the pressure duct 42. A spring 59 normally holds the discharge valve I! closed and acts opposite to pressure inside the actuating chamber 55.

A servo-motor of similar construction operates the admission valve 29 and comprises. a servopiston 58 movable in a servo-cylinder 61 which is sub-divided by the piston 69 into chambers 62 and 63. Chamber 63 is vented through a passage 59. Fluid under pressure is admitted to the operating chamber 62 through the branch duct 58 coming from the pressure duct 92. A biasing spring 65 bears against the servo-piston 69 and tends to maintain the valve 29 closed.

Admission of carbon dioxide under pressure into the duct 42 and its branches 58 is controlled by a control valve assembly 66. In the assembly a valve 5? normally held closed by a spring 68' controls a carbon dioxide supply duct 69 branching ofi from the supply duct 30 at a T-connection 79. After opening of the valve 61 carbon dioxide under pressure is admitted through a passage 1! to the valve chamber '12 of the valve 73 normally held open by a spring M. In the position shown, the duct 42 leading to the valve chamber 12 is in communication with a vent duct '15 leading to the atmosphere at 16.

The valves 61 and 13 have a joint actuating 4 member 11 biased by a spring l8 towards an inactive position in which it is shown in the drawing. The actuating member Ta is operable by a three-arm lever 19 pivoted at 89 and acted upon by a spring 8| which tends to turn the lever clockwisely.

An arm of the lever I9 cooperates with a trip lever 82 pivoted at 83. The trip lever 82 is acted upon by a spring 84 tending to turn it counterclockwisely. After turning of the three-armed lever 19 in counterclockwise direction, the trip lever 82 engages a side surface 85 of the tripple armed lever and comes to rest against a stop or projection 86 of the lever, thereby maintaining the three-armed lever in a deflected position in which both valves 57 and 13 are actuated. Valve 61 is then open to admit carbon dioxide under pressure, valve 13 being closed to seal the valve chamber 12 against the atmosphere.

The trip lever 82 may be restored to its inactive position by a release pin 81 adapted to engage the trip lever at 89 and extending into the metering chamber 55 for engagement with the top surface of the pistons M. A spring 89 hearing against a sleeve 99 on the release pin normally holds the pin in the depressed position in which it is shown in the drawing.

The triple armed lever 19 is actuated by a push button 9| bearing against the third arm 92 of the triple armed lever 19. The push button 9| is under the action of a spring 93- normally holding the push button in the inactive position shown and may be depressed by a coin operable mechanism comprising a'bell crank lever 93 engaging with a forked arm 95 a pin 95 of a bar 97 slidable in guides 98. The bar 93 is displaced to the right when a coin 99- inserted into a coin slot I39 thereby turning the bell crank lever 94 in a clockwise sense, which in turn causes depression of the push button 9! for actuation of the control valve assembly 65 in the manner just described.

For an explanation of the operation of the apparatus, it may be assumed that the apparatus is connected to suitable sources of supply, the inlet duct 2| being connected to a tank or reservoir containing water, the duct 49 to a tank containing flavoring syrup, and the supply duct 30 to a source of carbon dioxide under pressure.

In the condition in which the apparatus is ready to dispense beverage, the beverage chamber is filled with a quantity of fully carbonated andfiavored beverage under pressure up to a certain level which may be the liquid level Illl indicated in the drawings. The apparatus is then actuated by insertion of a coin into the coin slot [00 which starts an automatic cycle of operations as follows:

The coin 99 displaces the sliding bar 9'! to the right which in turn causes turning of the bell crank lever 94 in a clockwise sense and depression of the push button 91. The push button 91 turns the triple armed lever 'l9 counterclockwisely and the trip lever 82 drops down onto the projection 86 thus maintaining the triple armed lever deflected even after the coin 99 has cleared the sliding bar 91.

The triple armed lever '19 bears against the joint actuating member 11 of the control valve assembly 66 closing valve 13 and opening valve 61. Valve 13 seals the valve chamber 12 and the duct 62 against the atmosphere and carbon dioxide under pressure enters through the duct 69 and flows through passage II and valve chamber 12 into the duct 42 and its branches 58.

- 'As aresult the pressure increases in the servomotor chamber 62 above the servo-piston 60, forcing the valve member 29 downwardly and shutting off the interior of the beverage chamber l5 and the passage 28 from the source of carbon the beverage chamber 15 is relieved and the beverage therein is prepared for .dispensing/ r,

' At the same time carbon dioxide underpres-v sure flows through the duct 52 .intothe tubular.

space 33 forcing the tubular piston extension32 and the main piston 14 upwardly. The movement of the piston l4 takes place at a controlled.

slow rate depending onthe flow resistance in all the ducts and forces the volume of carbonated beverage slowly through the dispensing spout l9 intoa suitable under.

The upward movementof the piston l4 causes reduction in pressure in the pumping chamber IS with the result thatwater is drawn through the inlet duct2l past .the inlet check valve intov the gradually expanding pumping chamber which is filled with water.

After. thepiston ldhas traveled a certain distance, the control edge 32 on the innercylindrical'surface of the tubular. piston extension 32 moves past the port 5! shuttingoif the by.- pass .duct 59. During the further movement .of the piston Id suction isLcreated in the secondary pumping chamber 43 and flavoring liquid, such as. syrup, is drawn through ducts 49and'48into thesecondary pumping chamber. past the intake check valve 36. of that chamber. A certain amount of flavoring liquid is thus accumulated in the secondary pumping chamber 43..

-Near the end of its strokethe. piston. l4 engages the release pin 81 and pushes it against of the spring 59 while the admission valve 29' opens under the action of the spring 65. Carbon dioxide under pressure is now admitted through supply duct 3t, 26, 21 and 28 into the beverage chamber l5 initiating downward movement of the piston i l. The servo-motor of the piston i i, the tubular extension 32 movable in the tubular space 33, oifers no resistance to the downward movement since the pressure in it was'relieve'd by opening of the valve 13 in the control valve assembly. 1 1

The downward movement of the piston I4 forces the water out of the pumping chamber It past the outlet valve 23. The water flows through the passage 2% and meets with the flow of carbon dioxide in the duct 26 where it is subjected to.

violent turbulence at the constriction 3i insuring saturation of the water with the carbon dioxide. The charged water flows into the beverage chamber I5 where it mixes with flavoring syrup which at the same time is forced into the beverage cup or container placed theretion of the volume of the secondary pumping a set screw H33.

chamber 43 by the downward movement of-the. piston I 4. The piston 14 finally comes to rest with the beverage chamber [5 filled with carbonated flavored beverage under pressure ready for dispensing in the nextcycle of operations,

In the illustrated embodiment the invention provides a fully automatic apparatus forfeeding.

flavoring, carbonating, and dispensing of a beverage. The water used in the beverage need not be under pressure but is drawn from any ordinary water storage tank .under atmospheric pressure. Likewise it is not necessary that syrup be supplied to the apparatus under pressure since it is like,- wise drawn or pumped into the device. I g

The entire motive power is supplied by the pressure of the carbon dioxide thus making the apparatus independent of other sources of power, such as electricity. The beverage from the time of carbonation until actual dispensing is maintained :under pressure, whereby partial loss of the charge is prevented While thebeverage flows through the passages of the apparatus. As the beverage flows into the beverage chamber it, it isnaturally in a turbulent state-and would .;lose a substantial portion of its carbon dioxide charge were it not for the automatic provision.

that the beverage during these stages of handling is maintainedunder full carbon dioxide pressure.

The pressure is not relieved until theactual instant of dispensing of the beverage at. which time th beverage has assumed a quiescent state in which it best retains its charge. The rate of dischargeof the beverage is low whereby.turbulence is prevented or maintained at a mini- The ratio between flavoring syrup and water is adjustable by simple adjustmentof the central post.35. By adjusting the post upwardly the length of the stroke during which flavoring syrup is drawn into the secondary pumping chamber is decreased and by an opposite adjustment it is increased. i

It is of course not necessary that the apparatus be coin operated. Fig. 3 illustrates a modification in which a simple push button 9! extending to the outside of the housing ii is employed for actuating the triple armed lever iii. In the illustrated modification the trip lever is provided with an angular extension H32 cooperating with In the adjustment shown in Fig. 3 the set screw W3 is inoperative andthe mechanism. functions in the same manner as the mechanism of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

:Fig. 4 shows the operating mechanism in dif- ,ierent adjustments with a set screw we moved against the extension I02 whereby the trip lever 82' is moved out of a path of the three-armed lever 19. Inthis adjustment a partial volume of beverage maybe ;,dispensed from the appa- .;-.ratus, the actual dispensedvolume depending on the length of time the push button 9! is de-.

pressed. After release of the push button Si, 3

the control valve assembly 66 returns to its nor as the release of the trip lever 83 by the release pin 87, in the apparatus shown in Figs-l and 3.

A simplified form of dispensing'apparatus is shown in Figs. 5 to 7. The apparatus comprises a housing I04 on a base I95enclosed in'an outer shell )6. The housing provides a cylinder Elli in which a piston IE8 is movable dividing the acaaaee cylinder space into. a beverage chamber I09 and a dash-pot chamber H0.

The beverage chamber I09 has a discharge valve IiI controlling a discharge passage II 2 leading to a dispensing spout I I3.

Ali-admission valve H4 at the end of a beverage supply duct II 5 controls a passage II5 leading into the beverage chamber I09. The valves III and- H4 are. biased by springs Ill and H8, the discharge valve being normally closed and= the admission valve I I4 being normally open.

Both valves I II and H4 are jointly actuated in predetermined sequence by an actuating lever I I9 on a shaft I20 biased by aspring I2 I. A pair of cams I22 and I23 are fast on the shaft I20 and cooperate with rollers I24 and I25 on the ends of valve shafts I26 and I21 on the valve members III and H4. The cams I22 and I23 are so shaped as to cause actuation of the admission valve II4 before actuation of the discharge valve II I.

Uncarbonated beverage under pressure, for example, water from a water supply system, issupplied to the apparatus through a supply duct I28 leading to a float valve I29 operated by a liquid level responsive float I30. The fioat is pivotally mounted at I3I and operates to close the valve I29 after the liquid has risen to a predetermined level in the carbonating chamber I32. The carbonating chamber I32 is in the base of the apparatus and is supplied with beverage under pressure through a beverage duct I33 leading to a spray nozzle I34 at the top of the chamber. The nozzle I34 discharges beverage in the form of a spray over a system of baflles I39 in the chamber to insure intimate contact and saturation with carbon dioxide in the chamber. Carbon dioxide is admitted into the carbonating chamber I32 through a duct I35 extending from a pipe connection I31 to which a suitable source of carbon dioxide under pressure is connected. The beverage supply duct II5 extends into the lower normally beverage filled portion of the carbonating chamber I32.

The dash-pot chamber H is normally filled with liquid, for example water, and communicates with a liquid filled central chamber I38 through a restricted passage I39. The central chamber I38 is filled with liquid through a duct I4'I. Excess liquid may escape through. a fur ther duct I40.

The piston I08 is under the action of a spring I42 tending to force the piston into the chamber I09 to expel the beverage therefrom, the spring I42 acting in opposition to the pressure in the chamber I09 which tends to expand the chamber I09 and compress the spring I42.

The operations of the device shown in Figs. to 7 is substantially as follows:

Depression of the actuating lever II9 first causes the admission valve H4 to close, thereby shutting off the beverage chamber I09 from further supply of beverage and carbon dioxide pressure. After closing of the admission valve II4 the discharge valve III opens, relieving the carbon dioxide pressure in the beverage chamber I09. The piston I08 now rises under the action of the spring I42 causing the beverage to flow out through the dispensing spout II3. The rate of discharge of the beverage is slow and is determined by the flow resistance of the constricted passage I39 which admits fluid from the central chamber I30 into the dash-pot chamber H0 at. a low controlled rate of flow. The speed of the piston I08 is adjusted to a rate sufficiently c 8' low to cause minimum disturbance of the beverage fi'owing through the spout II3. Since the beverage is not under pressure when it flows through the discharge passage its turbulence is very low and practically all of its carbon dioxide charge is retained in it.

When the actuating lever H9 is released the discharge valve III closes and the admission valve- I-I 4 opens. Carbonated beverage under pressure. now flows from the carbonating chambar-I32 through the duct I'I5 into the beverage chamber I09 depressing the piston I08 until the beverage chamber is filled. As the liquid level in the carbonating chamber I32 drops the float valve. I29-opens admitting further beverage under pressure through passage I33 and the spray nozzle I34. The dispersed beverage issuing from the nozzle I34 hits the baffles. I35 and moves intimately with the carbon dioxide. in the carbonating chamber I32 absorbing a full charge of carbon dioxide. After the normal liquid level is re-established in the carbonating chamber I32 further flow of beverage is interrupted by the closing float valve I29. The carbonated beverage in. the carbonating chamber now remains under the. pressure. of the carbon dioxide admitted into the chamber by the duct I36.

The transfer of beverage from the carbonating chamber I32into the beverage chamber I09 takes place under carbon dioxide pressure whereby loss of the carbon dioxide charge of the beverage is prevented.

The device shown in Figs. 5 to 7 dispenses volumes up to the full volume of the beverage chamber. Partial volumes may be dispensed by releasing. the lever .I I9 before the total volume is discharged from the beverage chamber, whereupon the beverage chamber is automatically refilled.

The invention thus provides a method and various forms. of apparatus for dispensing carbonated: beverages with a particularly high charge of carbon dioxide. The beverage is maintained under carbon dioxide pressure whenever a transfer of the beverage is fed into the beverage chamber under pressure and pressure is maintained in the chamber throughout the period of. filling, in distinction from the conventional practice of filling such chambers under gradually rising pressure, the pressure being atmospheric at the start of the filling period whereby a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide charge is lost.

In the machines hereinbefore described, the beverage is carbonated, or the carbon dioxide charge replenished at a relatively late stage of handling of the beverage, immediately prior to the feeding of the beverage into the beverage chamber. This is a further feature insuring full carbonation.

It is, of course, not necessary that the entire carbon dioxide charge be supplied to the beverage in the dispensing apparatus proper. For example, pre-carbonated beverage may be fed into the machine shown in Figs. 5 to '7. Any

previous loss of carbon dioxide which may have occurred is then replenished in the carbcnating chamber I32 prior to dispensing.

The entire motive power for the apparatus shown in Fig. l is supplied by the carbon dioxide under pressure. The movable piston I4 which separates the beverage chamber I5 from the pumping chamber I6 is acted upon by carbon dioxide under pressure during the pumping stroke during which beverage is drawn into the pumping chamber. The piston is moved in the opposite direction to displace beverage from the pumping chamber into the beverage chamber by the pressure of the beverage flowing into the beverage chamber. The beverage exerts a greater force on the piston than the beverage in the pumping chamber to which a reduced area of the piston is exposed.

A further feature of the invention resides in the injection of flavoring liquid into the beverage while the beverage is under pressure. The beverage flowing into the beverage chamber 15 is naturally in a state of turbulence and mixes well with the flavoring liquid injected into the beverage chamber. Mixing of the carbonated beverage with a flavoring liquid therefore does not entail loss of a portion of a carbon dioxide charge since the beverage is maintained under pressure until it has assumed a quiescent state.

In this connection it is of course not necessary to make the means for injecting flavoring liquid an integral part of the apparatus. A manually operated pump leading to the beverage chamber will serve the same purpose. It is obviously possible to provide several ducts for injecting difierent flavoring liquids into the beverage chamber or into the path of the beverage flowing into the beverage chamber, whereby carbonated beverage of any of a plurality of flavors may be produced. The invention thus makes it unnecessary to store large individual supply tanks of flavored beverage since only one tank of a basic beverage or water is required.

Thus various changes and modifications of the method and the specific illustrated forms of apparatus may be made to meet specific requirements. Cooling means may be added to chill the beverage prior to dispensing. The assembly feeding flavoring syrup into the apparatus may be omitted, when fully flavored beverage is fed into the dispensing apparatus. The variable volume chamber may assume different forms, for example may be constructed as a bellows or sylphon. These and various other changes, additions, omissions, modifications and substitutions may be made within the scope of the invention without departure from its spirit and general teaching.

What is claimed is:

1. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a variable volume chamber; a source of supply of beverage under CO2 pressure; an admission valve between said chamber and said source;

a discharge spout; a discharge valve between said chamber and said spout; a servomotor operable by C02 under pressure for actuating each of said valves; a control valve for operating both of said servo-motors; and means for urging said chamber towards the adjustment of minimum volume.

2. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a variable volume chamber; a source of supply of beverage under pressure, a source of carbon dioxide under pressure; an admission valve between said chamber and said sources; a discharge spout; a discharge valve near the highest point of said chamber for relieving pressure therefrom and admitting beverage from said chamber to said spout; means for rging said chamber towards the adjustment of minimum volume against the action of pressure inside the chamber means for retarding adjustment of the chamber towards its maximum volume condition; and means for actuating Said. valves in predetermined sequence.

3. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a cylinder; a piston movable therein dividing said cylinder into a beverage and a pumping chamber; a discharge spout; a discharge valve between said beverage chamber and said spout; operating means for said discharge valve; a passage leading from said pumping chamber to said beverage chamber; an admission valve in said passage for controlling admission of fluid into said beverage chamber; operating means for said admission valve; inlet and outlet check valves associated with said pumping chamber, said outlet valve controlling flow of fluid from said pumping chamber into said passage; a supply duct for feeding CO2 under pressure into saidqpassage; a pressure fluid operable servo-motor for moving said piston in said cylinder; and control means for controlling flow of CO2 under pressure to said servo-motor and controlling said valve operating means.

4. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a cylinder; a piston movable therein dividing said cylinder into a beverage and a pumping chamber; a discharge spout; a pressure fluid operable valve for controlling flow of fluid from said chamber to said spout; a passage leading from said pumping to said beverage chamber; a pressure fluid operable admission valve in said passage; a pressure fluid operable servo-motor for moving said piston in said cylinder; inlet and outlet check valves associated with said pumping chamber; a supply duct for feeding 002 under pressure into said passage; and control means for controlling flow of CO2 under pressure to said pressure fluid operable valves and said servo-motor.

5. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a cylinder; a piston movable therein dividing said cylinder into a beverage and a pumpingchamber; a discharge spout; a discharge valve near the highest point of said beverage chamber controlling a duct to said spout; an admission valve controlling admission of liquid into said beverage chamber; an inlet valvev controlling admission of liquid into said pumping chamber; a passage leading from said pumping chamber to said admission valve; a duct for feeding CO2 under pressure into said passage; a servo-cylinder; a servo-piston in said servo-cylinder for moving said first named piston; servo-motors for said discharge and admission valves, said servo-motors being operable by C02 under pressure; and joint control means for controlling flow of CO2 to said servo-motors and said servo-cylinder.

6. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a cylinder; a stationary central post extending into said cylinder; a stationary annular member surrounding said central post leaving a tubular space between said post and member; a piston'movable in said cylinder the piston having a tubular extension slidably fitting between said central post and annular member for movement in said tubular space, the piston subdividing the cylinder space into a beverage chamber to one side of the piston, and to the other side an annular main pumping chamber, a central secondary pumping chamber,

and a tubular servo-motor chamber; a discharge beverage chamber; operating means for said admission valve; inlet and outlet check valves associated with said main pumping chamber, said outlet valve controlling flow of fluid from said main pumping chamber into said passage; a supply duct for feeding CO2 under pressure into said passage; a beverage supply duct leading to said inlet valve; an intake and an outlet check valve associated with said secondary pumping chamber, said last named outlet valve controlling flow from said secondary pumping chamber into said beverage chamber; a flavoring fluid supply duct leading to said intake-valve; and control means for controlling flow of 002 under pressure into said servo-motor chamber andcontrolling said valve operating means.

7. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a cylinder; a stationary central post extending into said cylinder; a stationary annular member surrounding said central post leaving a tubular space between said post and member; a piston movable in said cylinder the piston having a tubular extension slidably fitting between said central post and annular member for movement in said tubular space, the piston subdividing the cylinder space into a beverage chamber to one side of the piston, and to the other side an annular main pumping chamber, a central secondary pumping chamber, and a tubular servo-motor chamber; a discharge spout; a discharge valve near the highest point of said beverage chamber controlling flow of fluid to said spout; a passage leading from said pumping to said beverage chamber; an admission valve in said passage; pressure fluid operable actuating means for said discharge and admission valve inlet and outlet check valves associated with said main pumping chamber, said outlet valve controllin flow of fluid from said main pumping chamber into said passage; a, beverage supply duct leading to said inlet valve; an intake and an outlet check valve associated with said secondary pumping chamber, said last named outlet valve controlling flow from said secondary pumping chamber into said beverage chamber; a conduit for feeding CO2 under pressure into said passage; a flavoring fluid supply duct leading to said intake valve; and control means for controlling flow of CO2 under pressure into said servo-motor chamber and to said valve actuating means.

8. A device for carbonating and dispensing beverages comprising, a source of beverage; a source of carbon dioxide under pressure; suction means for drawing beverage into said device; means forming a passage for said beverage through said device including a plurality of chambers and means for carbonating said beverage; valves in said passage; carbon dioxide pressure operated means for feedin the beverage through said passage; and carbon dioxide pressure operated means for operating certain of said valves.

9. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a pumping chamber; a beverage chamber; a passage between said pumping and said beverage chamber; a beverage supply duct leading from a source of beverage to said pumping chamber; pumpin means .for feeding beverage from said source through said supply duct into said pumping chamber; a gas pressure operated servo-motor for actuating said pumping means; means for supplying CO2 under pressure to said beverage chamber; and means operated by the beverage pressure .for moving beverage from said pumping chamber into said beverage chamber.

10. A beverage dispenser comprising, in combination, a pumping chamber; a beverage chamber; a movable piston, one face of the piston being acted upon by fluid in said pumping chamber, another face of the piston of larger area than said one face being acted upon by fluid in said beverage chamber; a passage between said pumping and said beverage chamber; a check valve in said passage barring flow of fluid from said beverage chamber into said pumping chamber; a beverage supply duct leading from a source of beverage supply to said pumping chamber; gas pressure operated means for moving said piston in one direction to reduce the volume of the beverage chamber; means for supplying CO2 under pressure to said beverage chamber, the CO2 pressure moving said piston in the opposite direction.

PAUL KOLLSMAN.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,003,256 Hardy Sept. 12, 1911 1,114,360 Hormung Oct. 20, 1914 1,454,765 Patterson et al. May 8, 1923 1,798,095 Manley Mar. 24, 1931 1,939,280 Schietzel Dec. 12, 1933 2,039,564 Smith May 5, 1936 2,380,884 Von Stoeser et al. July 31, 1945 2,427,429 Waite et al. Sept. 16, 1947

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3037674 *Feb 4, 1959Jun 5, 1962Eggo Food Products IncMetering device
US3107638 *May 31, 1960Oct 22, 1963John Blue Company IncManually operable implement for injecting anhydrous ammonia and other liquid fertilizrs into the soil
US3109873 *Sep 8, 1959Nov 5, 1963William E HotchkissGas absorption apparatus
US3226099 *May 7, 1962Dec 28, 1965Vendo CoApparatus for preparing and discharging water having controlled amounts of carbonation
US3741552 *Mar 24, 1969Jun 26, 1973H MojonnierSystem and method for carbonating beverages
US4251473 *Aug 24, 1979Feb 17, 1981Sodastream LimitedFor carbonation of water
US4928853 *Aug 19, 1988May 29, 1990Fountain Fresh, Inc.End aisle fluid mixing and dispensing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/76, 99/275, 261/82, 99/323.1, 222/136, 222/249, 222/135, 222/373, 137/12.5, 137/170.4
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0016
European ClassificationB67D1/00F2