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Publication numberUS2644440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1953
Filing dateApr 10, 1952
Priority dateApr 10, 1952
Publication numberUS 2644440 A, US 2644440A, US-A-2644440, US2644440 A, US2644440A
InventorsBailey Sr Malcolm
Original AssigneeVergil G Stead
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning attachment for internalcombustion engines
US 2644440 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1953 M. BAILEY, SR 2,644,440

Filed April 10, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 CLEANING ATTACHMENT FOR INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES INVENTOR MALCOLM BAILEY SR.

. ATTORNEY;

M. BAlLEY,-S R

July 7, 1953 CLEANING ATTACHMENT FOR IN'fERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES 2 SheetsSheet 2 Filed April 10, 1952 I h Allllllllliiiilllliflilrll ll villi IIIIIII/I- INVENTOR MALCOLM BAILEY SR.

MM ATTORNE gine.

ments connected thereto;

Patented July 7, 1953 7 UNITED PATENT OFFICE Malcolm'Baily. SrL, Tampa; Fla assignor of one- 7 I half to Vergil G. Stead, Tampa, Fla,

' "Application April '10, 1952 Serial No. 281,688

.The present invention relates to an attachmerit for internal combustion engines "and'more particularly to a device for efficiently removing carbon and carbonaceous deposits from the en- An important object is to provide ricient and economical attachment for internal combustion engines which may readily'be connected to the carburetor When the air'cleaner or filter is removed, and" which is provided with' separate compartments one of which contains a suitable decarbonizingfcompound and the other a flushing compound that are independently introduced into the engine during the operation of the latter so as to remove carbon deposits there-f from and thoroughly clean the same, thus increasing the efficiency of operation of the engine,

reducing oil consumption and] obtaining maximum gas mileage. g r

A further object is to provide anew and improved method of cleaning or removing carbon deposits from internal'combustion engines by metering a decarbonizing liquid into the engines during the operation of the same, through the carburetor and the intake manifold into the combustion chamber so that carbon and sludge deposits on the piston rings and valves are loosened.

motor vehicle or the like.

Other objects and advantagesof the invention will become apparent from the followingdescription when taken in conjunction with the accompanying claims and drawings.

' ,Referring to the drawings in which is shown several preferred embodiments the invention may assume w t t r I Figure 1 is a front side view of an internal combustion engine showing the'improved attach- .Figure 2 is a detailed perspectiveview of the 'decarbonizing attachment removed from the n v FigureB is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-4 of Figure 2;

a simple, ef-v ,3 Claims. (Cl. 123198) valve 32 (Fig. 3).

. '2 t Figure 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of Figure 3; a

Figure 5 is a sectionalview taken substantially along the line 55 of Figure 3, and

I Figure 6 is a'perspective view 'ofone of the adjustable adapters for connecting the attachment to different sizes and types of carburetors.

Referring to thedrawings, Ill indicates an internal combustion engine which may be associated with a motor vehicle or the like, not shown, and is provided with the usual intake manifold H to which is connected the carburetor I2 In order to obtain maximum eificiency'in operation of the engine and gas mileage, and a minimum consumption of lubricating oil, simple, efficient and economical means are provided for loosening and removing the accumulation of car- "bon deposits from around the valve seats and'the valve stems. This means includes a removable attachment generally indicated by the numeral [3 and which is arranged to be detachably connected to the carburetor when the air filter or cleaner is removed therefrom. The attachment, as shown; is in the form of a substantially rectangular,- metal container I3 (Fig. 2) having a front panel M and a medially. depending throat or"tubular member 15 in which is rotatably mounted a choke or butterfly valve H5 normally maintained in its open position; The stem or shaft ll of this valve extends outwardly from one side thereof and is connected to an operating armor lever i8 by a threaded bolt l9 (Fig. 3). The-lower end of the throat [5 maybe provided with"circumferentially disposed vertical'sl'ots 20 so as to p'rovide-a-yieldable annular portion Zl arranged to be detachably secured to the inlet or throat 22 of the carburetor [2 (Fig. 1) by the clamping ring 23 and the threaded bolt 24 to which is connected'the thumb nut 25 (Fig. 2).

' The container i3 is preferably provided with a removable coveror lid 26 and is interiorly separated by the spaced vertical partitions 2'! intoseparate compartments or tanks 29 and 30. The compartment 29, as shown, is arranged to receive a decarbonized liquid compound that is noncorrosive in action, such as any suitable penetrating oil. The carbonremover is arranged to be injected into the engine In through the throat l5 by a flexibl'e pipe or tube, 3| which extends into the throat l5 and is provided with a rotatable The valve 32 has a manually operated handle 33 extending outwardly from the panel 14 (Fig. 2)-so as to control or meter the flow of the fluid in the compartment 29 into the throat I5, carburetor 1 2 and intake manifold l I. The compartment 30 is arranged to receive a suitable tune-up oil and communicates with the throat through a flexible pipe 34 having a control valve 35 and a manually operated knob 36 for controlling the flow of the fluid from the tank 30 into the engine through the carburetor l2 and the intake manifold l The pipes 3| and 34 are firmly connected to the partitions 21 in any suitable-manner; such as by the clamping nuts 28 (Fig. 3).

A gauge 3'! for accurately measuring the vacuum developed in the intake manifold H is removably mounted in the container .I3;:'in;'iany suitable manner such as by the transverse strap 38 and the spaced threaded: retaining nb01tS-F39r (Fig. 3). The vacuum gauge 31 operativelycommunicates through a flexible-tubing 40 with .the intake manifold II as at 4| (Fig; 1)."Theouter face of the gauge has a graduated scale" 42 calibrated in inches and a rotatable dial 43 so as to indicate intermsxof .inches of .mercury.-.the intake manifold vacuumof theengine. The lever or arm [8 of the butterfly-valve. IG-isvconnected to a flexible memberv suchasa loom. cable-.44,

"by the adjusting. screw-45 (Fig. 3). .The' loom 44 has a flexible wire 46 (Fig. 2) running therethrough thatis connected to a longitudinally reciprocating'knob or handle that extends outwardly from the panel [4 so as to provide manual means for actuating the gas throttle of the carburetor inorder to control the speed of the engine i0. Similarly, a loom cable 48 has. a flexible wire: 53 extending therethrough and is adjustably connected at its lower end as at 49-to anoperating arm 50 extendinglaterallyfrom the carburetor shaft til-(Fig.- 1). Thus,- meansare provided for conveniently connecting .the'. attachment to different sizes and makes of carburetors. The flexible cable 48' and-wire 53 are also connected to a reciprocating knob or handle 52 that extends outwardly from the panel-14 and which is spaced in substantially transverse alignment with the'knob 41. Thus,-.actuation of the knob 52 controls the speed of the engine. In

front of the panel 14 are a pair of vertically dis-a posed glass gravity'tub'es: 54 which arev closed at their upper ends and connected by a transverse bar 55. The lower end of each tube has an L- fitting 56, one of which 'communicates-withthe interior of the compartment 29'and the-other withthe compartment 30 to indicate-the quantity of fluid in each compartment. The front ofthe panel has vertical graduations 51 and '58'shown' a quarter of an inch apa'rt'and' arranged-to indicate the amount of fluid in each of the compartnrents 29 and 30.

vAs shown, the container I 3- is directly connected to the carburetor by the throat! 5 and theclamping ring .23 (Fig. 1). In order that the attach- :ment may be readily connected to dififerentsize:

carburetorsand makes of cars, L-shaped-adapters 59 (Fig. 6) of different diameters may be'provided. Each of these adapters has a vertical tubular portion 60 provided with an inlet portion SI of standard diameter so as to be clamped to the throat !5 by the ring 23. The horizontal portions 62 of each adapter varies in diameter so as to be readily connected. to the throats of carburetors of diiferent sizes. Thus, means are provided for connecting the attachment to. any. size or type of carburetor at a minimum expenditure of'time, labor and cost, "in order to.inject-a compound into the engine for the purpose of loosening and removing carbon ore-carbonaceous deposits therefrom. Itwillbeseen that.the .ver--? 10 which may be of any suitable size, are shown arranged to each receive a pint of a suitable liquid, compound. The attachment is clamped *1..to:.the 'carburetor 12 by the rod 24 and clamp- 'ing nut '25 upon the removal of the air filter. The

-l51cable Aaiis connected by the screw 49 to the car- .J:buretor:'shafti5l' and the-cable 40 to the intake ..mani f.old below the carburetor as at 4| (Fig. 1). 'Thecompartment 29 has been previously filled withzafdecarbonizing compound while the compartment 30 may be filled with a suitable flush- .ingliquid. The valves 32' and 35 have beenpre viously. rotated clockwiseor to the right somas .totbeyin their .=.closed position. The, knob 41;. is .moved inwardlyso that .the. choke valve l6 will be opened. The engine is started and the reading-of, the vacuum dial 42 is noted. The gas throttle handle 52- is pushed out until the engine .speedsup toabout 700 R. P. M.s. The valve 32 is rotated. counterclockwise or to the left so-as 'to introduce a steady flow of the decarbonizing compound from the compartment 29 through the throat l5, carburetor 12,.intake manifold II and into the engine l0. .Usually, all of the penetrat- .ing "oil-in the compartment 29 is allowed to be run throughthe engine so as-to loosen thecarbon and sludge deposits on-the piston rings and valves. The valve 32 is then .returnedto its closed position and while the engine is rotating'at the same low speed, that is, 700 R. P. M.s.-the valve 35 is 40 rotated to-i-ts open position so as to allow the tune-up oil-to run through the carburetor and engine in order to liquify' the gum and sludge. When. about-half the tune-up fluid in the compartmenti30 has been used-,- as indicated bythe ..glass-tube=54, the engine'is speeded up-to about 1800 R. P. M.s-and the choke knob 41 is moved outto-close the butterfly valve- 16 and until the engine-almost. goes dead. This operation causes raw gas to be introduced'into the engine so as to wash-.outall the gumwand sludge that has been -.-liquified and loosened by the penetratingoil; and .may be repeated several times. The choke knob 41. is then moved inwardly so as to open the butterfly valve I6 and the. knob52 .is moved so that \theengine will again revolve-at about 700 R. P. M.s. The valve .36 is. now opened sothat the balanceof the tune-up oil. in the tank 30 -may-.be-utilized--to lubricate the engine as it is restoredrtonormal operation. Due. to the removal of the gums andsludge from the valves .andrings, the vacuum gauge 42 will now show an increase of from two .tothreeinches, thusindieating the improvedefiiciencyof the engine.

It will be seen thatduring the cleaning opera- ,55 .tion,= when the butterfly valve 16 is closed, raw

7 nected to carburetors of .diiferent sizes and models .by one of the adjustable adapters 62 in the man- .ner asshownin.dottedlines in Fig- 4. In, in-

itially starting the device, the carburetor is set -to-r.un at a fastidle when. thetemperature of .the

engineis about I'F. .Ifgtheneedle 43. .onlthe vacuum gauge 42 jumps back and forth between and inches, this is an indication that the valves are sticking. On the other hand, if the needle does not come up over 12 or 14 inches, this shows that the engine has low compression and leaky valves or guides. Therefore, after the engine has warmed up, the valve 32 is rotated to its open position-until there is a steady flow of the penetrating fluid going through the carburetor. It is advisable under these conditions to allow the Whole pint of penetrating liquid to be fed into the engine so as to liquify all gum and sludge. The valve 32 is then closed and while the engine is operating at the same speed, the valve is moved to its open position so as to allow about half of the flushing fiuid or tune-up oil to run through the carburetor at a fast flow in the manner as previously described.

In cases where a hot spot develops or where the piston rings are stuck due to circulation being blocked in the water jacket, it is first necessary to check the compression on the cylinders to find which one has the low compression or stuck rings. To do this, the engine should first be heated to around 200,F. The spark plug is then removed from the low compression cylinder and two or three ounces of penetrating liquid is.

inserted through the spark plug opening and the spark plug is then loosely connected to the cylinder and allowed to stand for about two hours. The spark plug is then removed and the motor is turned over about ten times with the starter. The spark plug is now put back in place and the engine started after the attachment is connected to the carburetor so that the engine may be treated in the manner as previously described. The precision testing attachment is not a permanent installation mounted on the engine, but a device which may be readily detachably connected to the throat of the carburetor when the air cleaner is removed therefrom and is primarily used for checking, diagnosing and detecting the various troubles to which an internal combustion engine is subjected, such as sticky valves, manifold leaks and the like, thus providing means for causing the engine to run freer and cooler, and which reduces oil consumption and increases gas mileage so as to prolong the life of the car. The

penetrating liquid and the flushing liquid each has distinct purposes to perform and could not emciently be used singly. The choke or butterfly valve l6 also works independently from the throat in the carburetor and the vacuum guage 31 is so associated with the other parts as to work in conjunction with them efficiently to detect any engine trouble which may occur in order that the necessary steps may be taken to rectify the same. Thus it will be seen that the attachment is only temporarily connected to the engine during the checking and tuning-up operation.

Thus it will be seen that simple, efficient and positive method and attachment are provided for removing carbon and carbonaceous materials from the engine. Moreover, the vacuum gauge 42, which measures accurately the vacuum developed in the intake manifold, can be checked to ascertain the efficiency of operation and when this gauge shows between I8 and 2| inches of vacuum, it indicates that all gum and oxidation or sludge has been removed from the valve and valve guides and have loosened the piston rings so that they will properly contact and expand in order to increase the compression so that the engine is returned to its normal operating conditions. In other words, this cleaning treatment insures the engine running free, and cooler. Additionally, maximum gas mileage is obtained at a minimum consumption of oil thus increasing the life and efficiency of the engine.

It will be manifest that the forms of the invention shown and described'are merely illustrative and that such changes may be made as come within the scope of the following claims.

I claim: 7

1. In combination with the intake manifold and carburetor of an internal combustion engine, a precision testing attachment for detecting engine trouble, said attachment including a container having separate compartments, one of said compartments arranged to receive a penetratin liquid and another a flushing liquid, said container having a depending throat, means for detachably connecting said throat to the carburetor when the air cleaner is removed therefrom, a vacuum guage mounted in said container and having means communicating with the intake manifold for accurately measuring the vacuum developed in the manifold, valve means for selectively communicating the compartments with said throat, a choke valve mounted in the throat, manual control means mounted on the container and operatively connected to the choke valve for actuating the same, and manual control means mounted on the container and operatively connected to the throttle valve of the carburetor for controlling the speed of the engine.

2. In combination with the intake manifold and carburetor of an internal combustion engine as called for in claim 1 in which each of said compartments has an exposed transparent glass tube communicating therewith for indicating the amount of fluid therein.

3. In combination with the intake manifold and carburetor of an internal combustion engine, a precision testing'attachment for detecting engine trouble, said attachment including a container having three separate compartments, one of said compartments arranged to receive a penetrating liquid compound and one a flushin liquid compound, a vacuum guage mounted in the remaining compartment, means communicating the vacuum guage with the intake manifold, said container having a depending centrally disposed throat, means for detachably connecting said throat to the carburetor, valve means for selectively communicating the compartments adapted to receive the liquids with said throat, a choke valve in said throat, manually operable means mounted on the container and operatively connected to the choke valve for actuating the same, and manually operable means mounted on the container and operatively connected to the throttle valve of the carburetor for controlling the speed of the engine.

MALCOLM BAILEY, SR.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,183,483 OHara May 16, 1916 1,597,267 De Clairmont Aug. 24, 1926 2,239,949 Bartz Apr. 29, 1941 2,251,988 Curran Aug. 21, 1941 2,281,695 James et al May 5, 1942 2,366,073 Vallerie Dec. 26, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1183483 *Jun 3, 1915May 16, 1916Harry BruxerCarbon-remover for explosive-engines.
US1597267 *Mar 30, 1925Aug 24, 1926De Clairmont AdolfoDecarbonizing and lubricating device
US2239949 *Jan 23, 1940Apr 29, 1941Vulcan Mfg Co IncSolvent servicer for engines
US2251988 *Mar 30, 1938Aug 12, 1941Curran Alton FMethod of purging the internal parts of internal combustion engines
US2281695 *Mar 21, 1939May 5, 1942Lubri Zol CorpGum and carbon removal
US2366073 *Mar 13, 1942Dec 26, 1944Vallerie John EEngine cleaning and conditioning
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038454 *Feb 29, 1960Jun 12, 1962Alf HundereMethod for removing deposits from combustion chambers of internal combustion engines
US4353382 *Mar 5, 1981Oct 12, 1982Siemens AktiengesellschaftDevice for removing the lacquer from waveguides
US4494487 *Sep 24, 1979Jan 22, 1985John NixonEngine efficiency unit
US4552105 *Sep 4, 1984Nov 12, 1985Kioritz CorporationFuel pipe joint
US4606311 *Sep 14, 1984Aug 19, 1986Miller Special Tools, Div. Of Triangle Corp.Fuel injection cleaning system and apparatus
US5097806 *May 6, 1991Mar 24, 1992Wynn Oil CompanyMulti-mode engine cleaning fluid application apparatus and method
US5131421 *Sep 23, 1991Jul 21, 1992Hofbauer Arthur MAdaptor for flushing or cooling stern drive engines
US5257604 *Feb 10, 1992Nov 2, 1993Wynn Oil CompanyMulti-mode engine cleaning fluid application apparatus and method
US5390636 *Feb 14, 1994Feb 21, 1995Wynn Oil CompanyCoolant transfer apparatus and method, for engine/radiator cooling system
US5425333 *Feb 14, 1994Jun 20, 1995Wynn Oil CompanyAspiration controlled collant transfer apparatus and method, for engine/radiator cooling systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/198.00A, 73/114.44, 73/114.37, 134/113, 134/166.00R
International ClassificationF02B77/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02B77/04
European ClassificationF02B77/04