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Publication numberUS2644447 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1953
Filing dateJan 28, 1949
Priority dateJan 28, 1949
Publication numberUS 2644447 A, US 2644447A, US-A-2644447, US2644447 A, US2644447A
InventorsHelen E Sanders
Original AssigneeHelen E Sanders
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Posture correcting machine
US 2644447 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1953 H. 1;, SANDERS POSTURE CORRECTING MACHINE Filed Jan. 28, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet l A ELEN Samoa-25,.

1 INVEN TOR.

Jul 7, 1953' H. E. SANDERS POSTURE CGRRECTING MACHINE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 28 1949 HLE/V E S41v0 es,

IN VEN TOR.

Hrrae/veY.

Patented July 7, 1 953 v UNITED STATES PATENT orr cs Helen E. Sanders, Los Angelles, Calif.

Application January 28, 1949, Serial No. 73,267

6 Claims. (Cl. 12s-s2) This invention relates to the correction of posture. Whena person stands erect, the weight imposed upon the spinal column usually causes the lumbar vertebrae t assume an arch, the convex partof the. arch extending forwardly and producing a hollow in the-posterior portion immediately above the pelvic region. Furthermore, the lower ribs sag forward; and the buttocks project to the rear. I

Although such a posture (unless too pro-- nounced) has been commonly characterized as form in which it may be embodied. This form 15 shown inthedrawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. It will now be described indetail, for the purpose of and above the abdominal regions is produced;

and the center of gravity of the body is well forward of the spinal column. Furthermore, although a pad of cartilage is located between adjacent vertebrae, such a posture disturbs the alignment of the lumbar vertebrae, and they tip away from each other. While all these are in themselves undesirable, a still more serious effect may be encountered, due to the displacement of the abdominal organs from a normally intended arrangement. And all these effects are aggravated the greater the inward curvature of the lumbar vertebrae, acondition that is often en countered.

In the erect position, it has been found that the lumbar vertebrae should be in substantial vertical alignment. the body is centered substantially'along the spine, the floating ribs project horizontally, and r u the abdominal organs are in their intended natural positions. Muscular, strain is also reduced,

and the buttocks no longer project rearwardyto form an awkward and displeasing appearance.

It'is one of the objects of this invention to cause proper vertical alignment of the lumbar vertebrae, and thereby to efiect an improvement in posture with its attendant benefits.

Applicant has discoveredthat hen more clearly apparent from a consideration of a.

In this way, the weight or" the body. is in the normal .seated'position, the lumbar vertebrae become substantially rectilinearly tion, the treatment for correction of posture is illustrating the general principles of the inven-= tion; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the apparatus incorporating the invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross section, taken along a plane corresponding to line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a detailed, fragmentary section on a larger scale, illustrating a portion of the mechanism; and

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

The subject 1 to be treated is shown in phantom lines in Fig. 1. During the process of treatment, the subject i is seated upon a seat. or-cushion 2 which may be formed as a cushion resting upon a chair seat 3, ofthe usual iorm,"appropriately supported, as by the legs 4, upon the floor .5.

The cushion2 has a back portion 6 which is supported upon the back i of the chair structure. The cushion 2 can be made of any appropriate material, such as sponge rubber, which provides a comfortable seat for the subject I.

When the subject is properly seated on the seat 2, his back is disposed quite close to the back 6. The lumbar vertebrae, therefore, are in substantial alignment; and, furthermore, the subject I is in a relaxed position. In this posifacilitated. v

The'posture correction treatment involves the use of pads sand 9 (Fig. 2)'that may be made of soft sponge rubber attached to metal backings iii and II. These pads, as shown most clearly in Fig. 2, face oppositely and contact the sides of the subject i above the pelvic region and below the rib region. An abdominal pad 12, mounted on a metal backing i3, is adapted to contact the front of the subject l at the intercostal arch.

- rate of from sixty to seventy times a minute. This mode of treatment serves properly tozlalign the lumbar vertebrae, as well as the lower ribs. Upon repeated applications, the lumbar vertebrae remain in substantial vertical alignment, and the lower ribs extend more nearly horizontally. The posture is corrected; the center of gravity of the body then falls more nearly toward the spinal column; and the organs in the abdominal region are properly placed.

Reciprocation of the pads 8, 9 and I2 is effected in a manner now to be 'described.

Thusfextending "across the seat2, and near the front thereof, is a bar I4, which may be a hollow tube. The front pad I2 is mounted on bar I4 by the aid of a bracket I5 having the jaws l6 and I! (Fig. 3) that may be clamped together by a hand screw I8 around'the bar I4. This bracket has a short postIB-uponwhich the pad structure is supported. Collars'29 maintain the bracket I5 centrally of the bar I4.

The side pads 8 and 9 are similarly supported by the aid of posts2I and 22 joinedto brackets 23 and 24. These brackets are rigidly attached to the bars 25 and-26,-extending transverselyof the bar I4 and generally horizontally thereof. They are adjustably mounted :rearwardly and forwardly'by passing'through bracket structures 2'! and 29. These bracket structures-are supported upon the bar I4. Eachof these brackets 27 and 28 has a slot 29 communicating with the recesses through'whichthe'bars 25 and 2t pass. Accordingly, clamping hand screws 39 serve to hold the bars 25 and26 firmly-to the brackets '21 and '23. 'By loosening the hand screws 39, the bars 25 and 26 may bemoved axially to adjust the-position of the pads Sand 9. In order to'adjustthe spacebetween the pads 8 and 9; that: portion of each of the'brackets 29 and 21 which projects over the bar I4 is similarly split for the clamping screws 3I. Loosening the'clarnping screws 3| makes it possible to move the brackets-21 and28 along'the bar I4. Arm rests 32 and 33 may also be provided above the brackets 27 and 28. For thispurpose,

angle irons 34 M35 are attached to thebottom of the arm rests 32-'and 33,and are also attached to the brackets'zl and 28.

The brackets'2'i and 28 are each'provided with a supplemental hub portion 33 having a projecting collar--33 which serves as a" supplemental guide for the brackets.

The bar I4 is rigidly supported at the lefthand end-as viewed in-Fig. 3, ina boss 36 that extends from a'bracket 3'1. This'brackett'l is adjustably mounted on a pair of parallel bars 49 and 4| (which may be hollow tubes) disposed one above the other and supported in a manner to be hereinafter described. 7 Theright-hand end of these barsyas viewed in Fig. l, is joined by another bracket "42 in order to strengthen-the framework.

The bracket 31, inorder that it may be guided on the bars Mi -4!, is provided with a lower boss 43 through which the bar 4I passes. At its upper end the bracket is provided with :a wide boss 44 throughwhich the bar 49 passes. This wide boss has a -split portion 45 so as to provide clampingv of -thebossto the bar '49, as by the aid of the hand screw 46. By releasing the hand screw bracket 3'! may be moved rearwardly or forwardly of the seat 2 to adjust the position of the padi2. 'Thebracket 3'! is also provided with another split portion 41 through which passes ascrew-48 that holds thebracketSI in place. -l-Iowever,- this screw 48 holds the bracket being accomplished primarily by the hand boss 5! and the bracket 42.

in vertical fashion'along the bar 59.

spring 65 within the bar 45.

screw 46.

The entire framework, including the bars 40-4I, bracket 42, and bar I4, is supported by the aid of another bracket 49. This bracket 49 is adjustably mounted, as hereinafter described, upon an upright post or rod 59. The left-hand ends of the bars 40 and 4| are fastened to the bosses 5I52 projecting from the bracket 49. The bracket 49 is appropriately 'apertured for the reception of the bar 50.

This bar 59 is reciprocated in a vertical direction, and is guided for its reciprocation by an upper standard 53 and a lower standard 54 '(Fig'l). The upper standard 53 is formed as a'fpart of a stationary bracket 53a that is supported on a stationary vertical post 55. This verticalpost 55 is joined, as by the aid of the horizontal struts 56, 51 and 58, to the uprights extending from the rear legs 4. The lower standard 54 is attached to a plate 59 mounted below the seat portion 3.

The manner in which the bracket 49 is adjustably mounted upon the reciprocating rod 59 may be best explained in connection'with Figs. 1 and 4.

Thus, as shown most clearly'in Fig. 4,jthe'rod 49 is hollow, and is permanently joined into the At the right-hand end of the bar 49 is a sleeve 69 permanently joined to the bar 49. This sleeve 59 serves to guide a locking rod 6| which exten'ds'through the sleeve 59, and which hasa reduced'p'o'rtion 52 serving as a look. This reduced portion 'or look 62 is further guided by the short sleeve 63 in the left-hand end of the bar 49.

The lock 52 is adapted to beurged into any one of a number of recesses 64 that are arranged The lock 62 is urged to locking position by a compression The right-hand end of the spring 65 abuts the left-hand side of the sleeve'tt. Its left-hand end contacts a collar (it'mounted on the locking rod 6i.

Theright-hand end of the rod M is provided "with a handle t'iwhich may be. pulledbutwardly in order to'disengage the lock'62 froman'y'one of the recesses 54. It may be held in the disengaging position, as illustrated in Fig. 4, by turning the handle 6? so as to position the radial pin 68 (see also Fig. 5) against the right-hand face of the sleeve 63. When the'handle ST is turned to 'position'radial'pintii horizontally,it

"of the bar 55.

"may be received 'in the slot 69 'pro'vided'in the face of sleeve Gil. In'this way, the spring 65 is effective to urge the locking member 32 into engagement position.

By this means the position of the frame carrying the transverse bar I4 can be vertically'adjusted with'resp'ect to the reciprocating bar 50.

This bar is reciprocated by the aidof'a crank Illand a' connecting rod ll which connects the crank 19 toa clevis '12 mcunted'at the lower end I Crank 75 is rotated by the aid of apulley l3 operated by a small electric motor I4. The'motor 14, as well as the standard I5 for the pulley shaft l8,'are appropriately mounted upon a base 11 supported by the chair structure below the seat member 3. A belt 18a 'connects the pulley It of the 'motor with the pulley I3.

In order to permit the subject 1 to be seated without interference from the bar 14, this bar I4 and its associated framework, including the bracket 49, maybe swung about'the axis of rod so wneii the handle 61 is in the inactive position {of Fig. 4. For this purpose the rod 59 is made circular. Furthermore, when the handle 61 is in the releasing position, theentire frame structure rests upon a collar 19 mounted ,below the bracket 49. I

With the bar l4 thus moved out of the way, the subject I may be seated, and his feet may rest upon the hassock 80. When the patient is thus seated, the frame structure, including the bracket 49, may be moved back to active position, andthe height of the frame structure may be' adjusted and locked in position by turning the handle 67. In this active position, the frame structure may be maintained in locked position by the aid of an arm 8! (Figs. 1 and. 2). This arm 8| is pivotally mounted upon a boltBZ on the bracket 49; and its left-hand end carries a pad 83 contacting with the upright post 55. When the arm 8| is in the horizontal position, obviously it prevents pivotal "mounted on the barfor contacting opposite sides movement of the frame. However, it may be lifted to, the dot-and-dash line position of Fig. 1

', to permit pivotalfmovement of the frame.

A hand screw 88 is threaded into the bracket 49 to engage the arm 8| when it isin locking position. For this purpose, the arm 8| is provided with a notch 89 that embraces the screw 88.

Operation of themechanism is apparent from the foregoing description. .With the frame, in

cluding the bracket 49 and rod i4, swung out of the way, the subject I is seated in theproper position-against the back rest or cushion 6. Then theframe can be swung into active position and raised or lowered to conform with the requirements of the subject It may be locked in vertical position by releasing the handle 61.. It may alsobe locked against pivotal movement about bar 50 by the aid of the lever 8|. The bar I4 is 6 seat; a substantially vertically movable support; a guide for the support; meansfor-cyclically reciprocating said support; a first bracket adjustably mounted on said support; a pair of arms extending transversely of the support and carried by the bracket; said arms extending along one side of the seat; an adjustably mounted second bracket supported on the arms; a bar supported by the second bracket and extending along the front of the seat; anda pair of pads adjustably of a subject.

4. In a device of the character described: a

seat; a substantially vertically movable support;

a guide for the support; means for cyclically reciprocating said support; a first bracket adjustably mounted on said support; a pair of arms extending transversely of the support and carried by the bracket; said arms extending along one side of the seat; an adjustablymounted sec- 0nd bracket supported on the arms; a bar supported by the second bracket and extending along the front of the seat; a pair of pads adjustably mounted on the bar for contacting opposite sides of a subject; anda supplemental pad also adjustably mounted on the bar, for contacting the intercostal arch of the subject. v 5. In 'a device of the character describe'd: =-a seat; a substantially vertically movable support; a guide for the support; means for cyclically re ciprocating said support; a first bracket adjustably mounted on said support; a pair of arms extending transversely of the support and carried by .the bracket; said arms exmnding along one side of the seat; an adjustably mounted second bracket supported on the arms; a bar supported by the second bracket and extending along the front of the seat; a plurality of rods supported then adjusted along the bars and 4| by releasing the hand screw 46, so as to bring the abdominal pad I2 into proper position. The pads'8 and 9 are. similarly adjusted with v respect to the brackets 21 and 28 by first loosening end screws 30 and then adjusting the bars 25 or 26 within the brackets 2'lor 28.

By energizing the motor 14 the bar 50 is reciprooated at the rate of between sixty and seventy times a minute. Any desired period of treatment may be used, after which the motor 14 may be I deenergized and the frame structure swung out of the way.

The inventor claims; 4 I 1. In a device of the character'described: a seat for an upright subject; means forming a guide transverse to the seat; a frame above the seat and guided by said means; means for cyclically rei ciprocating said frame; and a pair of pads facing each otherand mounted on the frame for contacting thesides of the subject below the ribs.

2. In a device of the character described: a seat for a subject; means forming a guidetransverse to the seat; a frame guided by said means; means for cyclically reciprocating said frame; a pair of pads mounted on the frame for contacting the sides of the subject below the ribs; and a third pad mounted on the frame for contacting the subject at the intercostal arch.

3. In a device of the character described: a.

adjustably by the bar and extending toward the rear of the seat; and pads mounted on the rods.

6. In a device of the character described: a seat; a substantially vertically movable support; a guide for the support; means for cyclically reciprocating said support; a first bracket adjustably mounted on said support; a pair of arms extending transversely of the support and carried by the bracket; said arms extending along one side of the seat; an adjustably mounted second bracket supported on the arms; a bar supported by the second bracket and extending along the front of the seat; a pair of rods adjustably sup? ported by the bar and extending toward the rear of the seat; and opposed pads mounted on the rods.

HELEN E. SANDERS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 117,580 Wark Aug. 1, 1871 122,500 Taylor I Jan. 2, 1872 1,953,424 Miller Apr. 3, 1934 1,984,397. Dalyze 1 Dec. 18, 1934 2,062,299 Erickson Dec. 1, 1936 2,284,061 Korte ,May 26, 1942 2,427,053 Hampton Sept. 9, 1947 2,497,751 Wettlaufer Feb. 14, 1950 2,550.841

Martinez May 1, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US117580 *Aug 1, 1871 Improvement in movement-cure apparatus
US122500 *Jan 2, 1872 Improvement in rubbing apparatus for medical purposes
US1953424 *Feb 25, 1929Apr 3, 1934Miller Calvin ETherapeutic apparatus
US1984397 *Nov 9, 1931Dec 18, 1934Peter DalyzeMechanical chair
US2062299 *Jun 10, 1935Dec 1, 1936James B BradshawExercising and treatment apparatus
US2284061 *Apr 24, 1939May 26, 1942Korte Henry C FMechanical exercising device
US2427053 *Sep 16, 1946Sep 9, 1947H F T CompanyCombination chair and table for body massaging and muscle manipulation
US2497751 *Dec 12, 1947Feb 14, 1950William L WettlauferVibratory therapeutic chair
US2550841 *Sep 3, 1948May 1, 1951Martinez Larry SExercising device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2989566 *Feb 20, 1956Jun 20, 1961Hercules Powder Co LtdManufacture of oxygen-containing organic compounds
US3374784 *Jan 7, 1966Mar 26, 1968Edward S. AronoffMechanical massage apparatus with crank and slide
US6155994 *Jun 7, 1999Dec 5, 2000Myopoint, Inc.Methods and equipment for treating or preventing muscle pain or injury
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/101
International ClassificationA61H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/0149