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Publication numberUS2644452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1953
Filing dateMar 16, 1951
Priority dateMar 16, 1951
Publication numberUS 2644452 A, US 2644452A, US-A-2644452, US2644452 A, US2644452A
InventorsFrank E Brown
Original AssigneeFrederick M Turnbull
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medicament vial
US 2644452 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented July 7, 1953 OFFICE 24,644,452 MEDICAMENT- VIAL Frank E. Brown, Burbank, Calif., assignor to Frederick M. Turnbull, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application March 16, 1951, ASerial No. 216,059

y packaging of liquids otherV than medicaments.

Numbered among primary objects of the present invention are those of providing .a vial which may readily be carried by a physician and which will be instantly available for use, said unit permitting of the withdrawal of a hypoderrnic dosage embracing anywhere from a portion of the viall contents up to theentire body of liquid' contained within the latter. y

An additional object is that of furnishing a device of this type which will embody relatively fewV parts. each capable ofv ready manufacture 'and when so produced allowing Iof ready assemblage to furnish aninexpensive and readily usable device which willv safely retain medicament for desired'periods of time.

With these and other objects in mind, reference is had to the attachedsheet of drawings illustrating practical embodiments of the invention and in which:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a vial with Va portion of the cap broken away to disclose underlying construction; v

Fig. 2 is a sectional side view of the unit taken along the lines 2-2 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the device; y

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken along the lines 4-4 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated inFig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing an alternative form of structure; andl Fig. 6 is a View similar to Fig. l but showin-g the apparatus as illustrated in Fig. 5.

In these views the reference numeral I0 indicates the tubular body of the vial which is preferablyA formed with an integral wall IVI at one end. Conveniently these parts are made of glass. However, other materials might be employed. In any event it is preferred that the wall of body I 0 be transparent or, atleast, translucent. If, for example, theA capacity of this body be ten cubiccentimeters then,r as shown in Fig. 3, a series ofgraduations I2v may be provided upon the outer face Vof the body which will indicate the volume of `liquid remaining within the latter. Also, as shown irfthe several Views, it is preferred that the outer face of body I0 adiacentits onen end beflared outwardly as indicated at I3 to provide-a .gripping portion as hereinafter brought out. i 1 f '5 Claims.y (C1. 1285-272) As shown in detail in Figs. 2 and 4, the open end of body I0 is defined by an outwardly extendingY bead or lip I4. Below this part a portion I5 of reduced diameter is present. l This terminates in an outwardly extending surface I6 defining the upperedge of ared portion I3. A penetrable member in the form of a diaphragm I'I extends across the upper surface of lip 'or bead I4. It is provided with a downwardly extending flange portion I8 which may have its lower edge enlargedas at I9. The length of this flange is in excess of the height of lip I4. ATherefore, the inwardly extending portion I9` will be accommodated within the reduced diameter part I5' of body I0. To retain member Il against movement with respect to body I0 a ring 20 preferably of metal extends in intimate contact with the outer f-aceof ilange I8 and constricts the latter into tight engagement with the outer face of lip I4. Rotatably bearing against the outer face of ring20 is the flange 2l of a cap 22. Adjacent its lower edge flange 2| may be enlarged as at 23; this enlargement extending into the space provided by reduced portion I5 and below the lower edge of ring 2U. This cap will therefore be rotatable with respect to the penetrable member I1 and body I0. Both that member andthe cap are conveniently formed of rubber. ,If desired, cap 22 could be formed of more rigid material than member I'I. For example, certain types of plastic would be satisfactory for this purpose. Likewise under certain circumstances member I'I might be formed -of materials other than rubber.

, Itis preferred that a detent structure be provided such that cap 2,2 will notaccidentally rotate7`with respect to the remainder of the assembly; Therefore as shown in Figs. 1 to 4 the lower face of cap body 22 is formed with a projecting portion'24. T-hs rides within a series of recesses 251formed in the upper face of penetrabl'ef' member I1. These recesses are disposed in the'form of a circle and ,as illustrated are preferably deeper at one end than at the other. Therefore they function as ratchets. Accordingly as thejdetent 24 rides into them they resist or ,prevent a rotation of cap 22 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. l although permitting of rotation in a clockwise direction.

With a View to providing a registering mechanism .as part of theassembly, the outer face of band or ring 20 is provided with indicia in the form of' numerals corresponding to the indicia I 2'. 'One of these numeralsv has been indicated at 2B in Fig. 3. Y It will be understood that if, forl example, vthe capacity of the vial be ten cubic centimeters and the indicia I2 be graduated accordingly, the series of numerals 26 may again number from I to I and extend throughout the circumference of the ring. The side ange 2| of cap 22 is formed with a window or opening 21. This is disposed in line with the numerals 26. Accordingly as cap 22 is rotated the numerals upon the face of the ring or band 20 will be consecutively displayed through this window.

The upper face of penetrable member I'I is rendered accessible by forming the body of cap 22 with an opening 28 disposed to one side of the center of the cap. Preferably, and as shown, the side edges of this opening are bevelled. In other words, a somewhat wedge-shaped hole is. pro,

vided. As shown in Fig. 4, this hole or opening receives the hub 2!! of a needle 30 which has been caused to pierce member I1. Therefore, when the cannula is projected as in Fig. 4, the flared surfaces of opening 28 bear against the cone surfaces of the `needleand its hub. This will ordinarily limit the amount of projection of the needle. Also', it will serve to somewhat flex member I1 away from the under face of cap 22. Accordingly, any tendency of the cap and diaphragm or penetrable member to remain in intimate frictional engagement will be relieved. Therefore, after this operation the cap may always be turned without difficulty with respect to the remainder of the assembly.y

'In the form of structure shown in Fig. 5, the open end of body I!) is defined by the outer surface of the ared portion I3. A penetrablemember of rubber or similar material is rigidly connected to the body I@ by incorporating in the member a neck portion 3I extending into the mouth of body Il). This neck portion is continued in the form of an outwardly or radially extending portion an axially extending portion 33 which is penetrable and an outer portion or end face 34. While this member should be formed of relatively soft material such as rubber, it should also incorporate suicient rigidity to be self-sustaining. To prevent rotation of this member with respect to body I0, the outer faces of its outwardly extending portion 32 may be formed with any desirable number of projections These may be received within corresponding recesses formed in the outer surface of the flared portion I3 of body I0. Obviously a suitablesubstance or layer of adhesion between the parts might also be employed.

A cap encloses the outer end of the assembly. rThis cap, as shown, may include an laxially extending iiange portion continued in the form of a constrcted skirt 3l. The latter will lie in rotatable and retaining contact with-the outer face of the flared portion I3. The outer end of the cap is defined by a transverse portion 31 lying yond the penetrable part 33. An olfcenter opening Sil is formed in the body of the cap and registers with a series of numerals or other suitable indicia 39 on the outer portion 34 of the penetrable member. As the cap is rotated with `respect to the assembly, consecutive nu meralswill appear through the window or opening 38. The side flange of the cap is formed with Aan opening 40 which, like the opening 28 in the device illustrated in Figures l through 6, is disposed to one side of the center In common with the'opening 28, this opening may be flared or wedge-shaped so that as the needle 30 is in' troducedinto the opening the cone surfaces of hub" 29'will vbear in proper relationship against the surfaces 'of the hole. In thisform of con-'- struction a detent provision may or may not be incorporated in accordance with the desires of the manufacturer it being understood that, in certain instances, the detent structure as shown in connection with Figs. 1 to 4 might also b-e dispensed with.

A physician in using the apparatus. as shown in Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive will have available a vial containing, for example, ten cubic centimeters of medicament. When it is desired to make a hypodermic injection he may remove a covering layerv (not shown) which would extend over opening'28 and maintain the layer II below that opening in sterile condition. Thereafter, and as shown in Fig. 4, he may cause needle 3D topierce the rubber cap or penetrable member I1. As afore brought out, the cone of the needle hub 29 may bear against the belevelled edge surfaces of opening 28 so that the parts properly cooperate. The syringe assembly may now be aspirated and the vial is conveniently inverted during this step. The syringe is now removed'so that the needle is lwithdrawn and the hypodermic injection may be eiected. In withdrawing liquid from the vial, the physician or other user will, of course, be able to check against the graduations I2 so that precisely the desired amount of medicament `will be drawn intovthe barrel of the syringe.

Assuming such withdrawal to have been one cubic centimeter, then upon vthe vial being placed in an upright position, this will be evidenced by the upper level of the liquid being in line with the second graduation. If a subsequent injection is desired, thenthe user may simply rotate the selector cap 22 until the window or aperture 21 of the same registers with the indicia mark 2S embracing the numeral. The entire operation may now be repeated. It willV be understood that in such repeating, the user will be presented with a fresh and unpunctured surface of the sealing'cap II through the opening 28. This will make him aware of the fact that the outer cap has been indexed or shifted. The surface to be pierced will be sterile and the outside scale serve as a further check accounting for thebody of fluid which remains within the vial. Due to the ratchet effect of the detent structure, the entire circular area of the penetrable member I1 is traversed by the zone defining opening 23 of cap 22. Therefore `withthe completion of one rotation of this cap the contents of the vial should be exhausted and the unit may be discarded. As the user grips the vial, his fingers will bear against the ared -area I3. Therefore with the pressure .which is exercised by causing needle penetration, there will Ibe no danger of the unit slippingout of the grasp of the physician.

In the assembly as shown in Fig. 5 a similar procedure occurs. The cap 3'I is rotated with respect to the body of the vial. In such rotation successive members or other indicia 39 are rendered visible through the opening 38. This will render the user aware -of the volume of liquid which remains within the vial. Also, as relative-rotation occurs, fresh areas of the ange 33 will constantly be presented through the opening 40 for penetration by the needle 30.

Thus, among others, the several objects of the invention as specically aforenoted are achieved. Obviously numerous changes in construction and rearrangement of the parts might be restored to without departing from the spiritof 'the invention as dened -bythe claims.

I claim: Y n 1. A vial including in combination a tubular open ended body, a member i'ncludinga neck portion to extend into the bore of said body, an outwardly extending portion to bear against the end edge of said body, yand `an axially extending penetrable portion projecting beyondsaid outwardly extending portion, a cap rotatably mounted by said body, said cap comprising and end portion and an axially extending iiange, said flange being formed with an opening exposing dii'erent' areas of 'the axially extending portion of said member as said cap is rotated with respect-to the latter. Y Y Y 2. A medicament vial comprising the combination of a tubular body open at one endand having an end edge; `a penetrable member rigidly connected to said body `and sealing the open end thereof, said member including a neck portion extending into said body, a radially extending portion bearing against the end edge of said body, an axially extending portion projecting beyond said radially'extending portion, and an end face extending across said axially extending portion; a cap rotatably mounted on said body and encomwpassing the exposed surfaces of said penetrable member, said cap comprising an end portion and an axially extending iiange, said flange having an opening closely adjacent said cap end portion, said opening exposing diferent areas of the axially extending portion of said member as said cap is rotated with respect to the latter and through which opening a hypodermic needle may be projected in a direction substantially parallel to'said cap end portion toY puncture said penethe latter and through which opening a hypodermic needle may lbe projected in a direction substantially parallel to said cap end portion to puncture said penetrable member and communicate with the medicament within said vial. and said cap end portion being provided with an aperture registering with said indicia to indicate the position of said cap with respect to said member. f Y

4. A medicament vial comprising the combinabination of a tubular body open at one end, a member rigidly connected to said bodyand sealing the open end thereof, said member having an axially extending penetrable portion, a cap rotatably mounted on said body and encompassing the exposed surfaces of said penetrable portion, said cap comprising an end portion and an axially extending flange, said flange having an opening exposing differentareas ofthe penetrable portion as said cap is'rotated' lwith respect to the latter land through which opening a hypodermic needle may be projected to puncture said penetrable portion and communicate with the medicament within said vial.

5. A medicament vial comprising the combination of a tubular body open at one end, a, memtrable memberand communicate with the lmetion as saidrcap is rotated with respect to the dicament within said vial, l

3. A medicament vial comprising the combination of a tubular body open at one end and having an end edge;A a penetrable member rigidly connected to said body and sealingthe open` endthereof, said member including a neck portion extending into said body, a radially extending penetrable member, said cap comprising an end portion and an axially extending flange, said ange having an opening closely adjacent said cap end portion, said opening exposing different areas of the axially extending portion of said ber rigidly connected to said body and sealing the open end thereof, said member being provided with indicia and having an axially extending penetrable portion, a cap rotatably mountedon said body and encompassing the exposed surfaces of said penetrable portion, said cap comprising an end -portion and an axially vextending ange, said flange having an opening exposing diierent'areasV of the penetrable por- FRANK E. BROWN.

References cited in the nie of this patent UNITED sTATEs'PATENTs Number Name Date A 1,007,804 Schimmel 4 Nov. 7, 1911 1,421,696 Kucera July 4, 1922 2,020,828 Goldberg Nov. 12, 1935 2,459,304

Blank Jan. 18, 1949

Patent Citations
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US2020828 *Jun 12, 1933Nov 12, 1935Novocol Chemical Mfg Co IncHypodermic syringe and closure cap for containers
US2459304 *Aug 28, 1946Jan 18, 1949Blank FrederickMedical vial stopper for insuring sterile needle punctures
Referenced by
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US8662075Dec 7, 2011Mar 4, 2014Trudell Medical InternationalDispensing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/415, 215/DIG.300, 215/230, 215/247
International ClassificationA61J1/00, A61J1/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/03, A61J1/1406
European ClassificationA61J1/14B