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Publication numberUS2645584 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1953
Filing dateFeb 6, 1950
Priority dateFeb 6, 1950
Publication numberUS 2645584 A, US 2645584A, US-A-2645584, US2645584 A, US2645584A
InventorsWiegerink Sr James G
Original AssigneeWiegerink Sr James G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ironing aid and textile refinishing composition
US 2645584 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented July 14, 1953 IRONING AID AND TEXTILE REFINISHING COMPOSITION James G. Wiegerink, Sr., Ridley Park, Pa.

No Drawing. Application February 6, 1950,

Serial No. 142,711

14 Claims.

The present invention relates to an improvement in ironing aids and textile refinishing compositions.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved textile finishing composition that can be employed in a laundering operation in a manner analogous to conventional starching.

Another object is to provide a textile refinishing composition that facilitates a subsequent ironing operation.

A further object is to provide a composition that is readily applied to textile articles, particularly rayon articles, to improve their appearance and feel.

The above and other objects will become apparent in the course of the following description.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my abandoned application Serial No. 71,019, filed January l i, 1949.

Textile articles and particularly Washable textile garments in their new condition have a characteristic appearance and feel or hand that are highly desirable. It is Well known that in course of use and repeated laundering the articles lose these good qualities. In the case of certain fabrics, principally cotton goods, starching is resorted to in order to improve the appearance and feel and to approximate the properties of new fabric. The starching operation is frequently unsatisfactory in that it produces a harsh, boardy feel and detracts from the normal drape of the.

article when it is used. Where ironing of the starched articles is contemplated, it is considered virtually necessary to add a lubricant to the starching solution to avoid sticking of the starch,

to the iron and the attendant danger of charring starch. These lubricants are usually hydrocarbon or vegetable Waxes which are difficult to disperse in the starching solutions and if improperly used result in undesirable Wax spots on the finished articles. I

One aspect of the present invention consists in improving the sizing or refinishing composition for use on goods that are usually starched. The composition of the invention has the advantages of providing the body of starch without its boardiness, improving the appearance of the treated goods, and avoiding the necessity of using the difiicultly dispersible waxes as ironing aids.

In the case of textile articles made of rayon, nylon, silk or other fibers that are softer and limper than cottons, conventional starching is unsatisfactory and after repeated launderings the manufacturers finish is removed, leaving the articles in an unattractive condition.

Another aspect of the invention GOIlSlStsinpx-oviding a refinishing composition which retains or restores the typical appearance and feel of new textile articles made of rayon, nylon, silk or the like. A collateral advantage in using the compositions of the invention on articles of this type resides in the fact that after applying the finish (which may immediately follow washing and rinsing) the articles may be ironed or pressed at once. With rayon garments the ironing operation may be carried out with an iron substantially hotter than untreated rayon could stand.

The compositions according to the invention contain two essential ingredients, namely, a water-soluble Wax consisting of polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate, polyoxyethylene glycerol tri-hydroxy stearate, or mixtures of these two, and a Water-soluble to colloidally dispersible polymeric colloid. Minor amounts of optional ingredients such as softening or conditioning agents for the polymeric colloid and/or for the textile material, preservatives, perfumes or deodorants, coloring agents, etc., can also be present in the compositions.

The water-soluble Waxes contemplated contain from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol of the glycerol triester and preferably from to 200 oxyethylene groups per mol. These waxes are normally solid materials with hardness that increases with the number of oxyethylene groups. In the preferred range the Waxes can be characterized 13,5 hard, brittle, waxy and Water-soluble. These waxes are made by reacting ethylene oxide and the trihydroxy ester in the indicated mol proportions under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure that are well known in the chemical arts. For examples of the reaction, see Patent No. 1,970,578. The ethylene oxide adds to the hydroxyl groups of the hydroxy ester forming polyoxyethylene ether chains terminating in hydroxyl groups. The addition is quantitative and the indicated 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups are introduced by reacting 50 to 300 mols of ethylene oxide respectively with one mol of the selected glycerol triester. It will be understood that the products of this reaction are a mixture of diiferent oxyethylene compounds which have an average oxyethylene unit per mol value corresponding to the mol proportions of the reactants. Castor oil is a suitable starting material for making the polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate and hydrogenated castor oil is suitable for making the polyoxyethylene glycerol tri-hydroxystearate. Partially hydrogenated castor oil can be used to make the mixed polyoxyethylene ethers of glycerol triricinoleate and glycerol tri-hydroxystearate. Likewise mixed products can be made by reacting ethylene oxide with mixtures of castor oil and hydrogenated castor oil, advantageously in 50-50 proportions. Similar mixtures can also be made by combining separately prepared polyoxyethylene castor oil and polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil.

For home or commercial laundry aids the preierred wax is either polyoxyethylene castor 011 containing 200 oxyethylene groups per mol or polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil contaming 150 oxyethylene groups per mol. Both of these products are hard, brittle, water-soluble waxes.

The water-soluble to colloidally dispersrble polymeric colloids that can be used include sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (the CMC of commerce), starch, gelatine, polyvinyl alcohol, polymethacrylic acid, methyl cellulose, sodium salt of maleated styrene (sold under the trade-mark Stymer) and hydroxy-ethyl cellulose. Oi these materials sodium carboxymethyl cellulose is preferred for its lack of odor and color, resistance to mold and bacterial attack, and for the soft finish it leaves on the treated articles.

The proportions of water-soluble wax topolymeric colloid may be varied from 0.25 to 6 parts of wax per part of colloid. Preferred compositions are those containing 2 to 4 parts wax to one part of the colloid.

The compositions may be mixed dry and distributed in powder or cake form. It is also contemplated to package the composition in a capsule form in which case the capsule may be a portion of the colloid, for example, gelatin. Alternatively the compositions can be prepared and distributed in the form of solutions. Due to limitations imposed by increasing viscosity the solutions are preferably not over 20% solids concentration and may be as low as 0.5% solids. Water is the preferred solvent for these solutions, I

The following examples illustrate compositions according to the invention:

Example .1

1.7 parts by weight of medium viscosity sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and 5 parts of polyoxyethylene castor oil containing 200 oxyethylene groups per mol were dissolved in 93.3 parts water. The solution was viscous but sufiiciently fiowable for household dispensing.

To prepare a textile treating solution one volume of the solution was diluted with volumes of water. Lukewarm water is preferred for comfort in handling but the temperature of the water is not important. Textile articles, garments, flat goods, draperies, etc., of cotton, rayon, silk and nylon were successfully refinished by dipping them into the dilute solution. Where ironing was required, it was found possible to start it as soon as the treated articles were wrung out and without waiting for them to dry.

Example 2 A solution was prepared with the following ingredients, parts being by weight:

parts polyoxyethylene hydrogenated castor oil containing 127 oxyethylene groups per mol 3.5 parts gelatine 0.5 part medium viscosity sodium carboxymethyl cellulose 81 parts water The product was a viscous liquid. F91 15$ in textile treating one volume of this liquid is diluted with 16 volumes of water.

Example 3 A conventional laundry starching solution was prepared containing about 1% starch by weight.

To one quart of this solution was added one tablespoon of a 20% by weight aqueous solution of polyoxyethylene castor oil containing 81 oxy-.

ethylene groups per mol. The resulting mixture contained approximately 0.3 part of the wax per Example 4 To 94.67 parts by weight of water warmed to to C. were added 1.33 parts or medium viscosity sodium carboxymethyl cellulose. After solution was complete 4 parts of polyoxyethylene castor oil, containing 200 oxyethylene groups per mol, were added and dissolved.

This solution was diluted with 4 parts by volume of water and used as a refinishing size for rayon textile articles resulting in an improved feel and appearance.

Many variations of the invention can be practlced without departing from the spirit thereof as defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of (l) a watersoluble wax consisting of at least one polyoxyethylene compound of the group consisting of a polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol and a polyoxyethylene glycerol tri-hydroxy stearate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol, and (2) a water-soluble to colloidally dispersible polymeric colloid.

2. A composition as defined in claim 1 wherein the proportions of ingredients are from 0.25 to 6 parts of said wax per part of said colloid.

3. A composition as defined in claim 1 wherein the proportions of ingredients are from 2 to 4 parts of said wax per part of said colloid.

4. A composition as defined in claim 1 wherein the said colloid is starch.

5. An ironing aid and textil refinishing composition consisting essentially of (1) a watersoluble wax consisting of at least one polyoxyethylene compound of the group consisting of a polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol and a polyoxyethylene glycerol tri-hydroxystearate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol, and (2) sodium carboxymethyl cellulose.

6. A composition as defined in claim 1 wherein the said colloid is gelatin.

'7. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of a polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate with from to 200 oxyethylene groups per mol and a water-soluble to colloidally dispersible polymeric colloid.

8. An ironing aid and textile refinishing compositlon consisting essentially of a polyoxyeth- .3 ylene glycerol tri-hydroxystearate with from 100 to 200 oxyethylene groups per mol and a watersoluble to colloidally dispersible polymeric colloid.

9. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of a polyoxyethylene castor oil with from 100 to 200 oxyethylene r ups per mol and starch in the proportions of from 0.25 to 6 parts of said polyoxyethylene castor oil per part of starch.

10. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of a polyoxyethylene castor oil with from 100 to 200 oxyethylene grou s per mol and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose in the proportions of 0.25 to 6 parts of said polyoxyethylene castor oil per part of said cellulose compound.

11. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a water-soluble wax consisting of at least one polyoxyethylene compound of the group consisting of a polyoxyethylene glycerol triricinoleate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol and a polyoxyethylene glycerol tri-hydroxystearate with from 50 to 300 oxyethylene groups per mol, and a water-soluble to colloidally dispersible polymeric colloid, said wax being present in the proportion of 0.25 to 6 parts 6 per part of said colloid, and said solution containing from 0.5 to 20% solids by weight.

12. A composition as defined in claim 11 wherein the said colloid is starch.

13. A composition as defined in claim 11 wherein the said colloid is sodium carboxymethyl cellulose.

14. An ironing aid and textile refinishing composition consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a polyoxyethylene castor oil with 200 oxyethylene groups per mol and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose.

JAMES G. WIEGERINK, SR.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,374,931 Grifiin May 1, 1945 2,390,212 Fritz Dec. 4, 1945 OTHER REFERENCES McClelland et a1. Chem. & Eng. News, 23 (1945) pp. 247 to 251.

AtlasSurface Active Agent 1948, p. 60, formula No. 60 and Table No. 1, between .pages 26 and 2'7.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2374931 *Mar 26, 1942May 1, 1945Atlas Powder CoWax composition
US2390212 *Sep 22, 1942Dec 4, 1945Nat Oil Prod CoAntifoaming agents
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2920980 *Mar 28, 1956Jan 12, 1960Du PontFinishing fabrics
US3068120 *Aug 17, 1960Dec 11, 1962Albert JacobsonTextile sizing spray and method
US3236670 *Jan 27, 1965Feb 22, 1966Winton Engineering CoOffset eliminating powder and method of eliminating offset printing
US3770471 *Dec 27, 1971Nov 6, 1973Kao CorpStarching composition
US4950412 *Mar 20, 1989Aug 21, 1990Lever Brothers CompanyFabric conditioning composition
US4964873 *Mar 20, 1989Oct 23, 1990Lever Brothers CompanyFabric conditioning method
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/156.22, 106/207.5, 106/179.1, 508/217, 508/216, 508/219, 508/486, 106/184.3
International ClassificationD06M15/53, D06M15/37
Cooperative ClassificationD06M2200/20, D06M15/53
European ClassificationD06M15/53