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Publication numberUS2646252 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1953
Filing dateApr 11, 1950
Priority dateApr 11, 1950
Publication numberUS 2646252 A, US 2646252A, US-A-2646252, US2646252 A, US2646252A
InventorsHylbak Harley E
Original AssigneeAtomic Energy Commission
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well casing soil sampler
US 2646252 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK 2,646,252

WELL cAsING son. SAMPLER Filed April 11, 195o e sheets-sheet 1 July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK wELL cAsING soIL SAMPLER 8 Sheets=Sheet 2 Filed April 11, 1950 July 2l, l953 v H. E, HYLBAK 2,646,252

WELL CASING SOIL SAMPLER 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 11, 1950 INVENTOR. Har/51 E/Yy/ all July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK y 2,646,252

WELL CASING SOIL SAMPLER Filed April 11, 1950 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 FEM a; N IIOR.

July 2l, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK 2,646,252

WELL CASING SOIL SAMPLER Filed April 11, 1950 zsheets-Shee't 5 INVENTOR. Har/Q15; T /yla/P BY July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK WELL CASING soIL SAMPLER 8 Shee'csfShee-t 6 Filed Apri] l1, 1950 mir Mfammrn! I INVENTOR. arzqy p53/bak BY July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK WELL. CASING SOIL SAMPLER 8 Sheetsffieet 7 Filed April l1, 1950 /46 IIIIIIIM INVENTOR. Hari@ f.' gy Zaf? BY July 21, 1953 H. E. HYLBAK 2,646,252

WELL CASING -SOIL SAMPLER 'Filed April 11, 195o ra sheets-sheet 8 n I' w., 2%- i" 5 f S s V a III f 106 {O/ f m W /i/ b/ 140 f l Il kf/' f5] zy/ l f5@ J l faz PIELES- FIEEEJ.

Patented `Iuly 21, 1953 the United States of America as represented Y Y by the United States Atomic Energy Commission Y Application April 11, 1950,seria1No. 155,327

': 8 Claims.

This invention relates to an apparatus for takpose of this invention to provide apparatus for obtaining specimens from wells having such casings at whatever level is desired.

This invention provides fundamentally a drill bit, an auger bit, and a plugging ram which are mounted on a turret head. In turn the turret head is attached to a cam, the entire mechanism being enclosed in a housing adapted to be lowered into a well. Upon the rst revolution of theV cam, the turret head is moved from the center of the housing toward the well casing with the revolving drill vbit in the advanced position. As 'the cam passes through its position of maximum advancement the drill bit completes the 'perforation of the casing'and begins to retract into the housing. Upon complete retraction the cam has compelted one revolution and a pawl and ratchet are activated to rotate theturret to a second position with the auger bit poised for operation. AAs the cam moves through a second revolution the auger kbit passes beyond the perforation of the casing into the lsoil from which a specimen is drawn into a receptacle in thehousing.- The completion of the second revolution has the auger bit fully retracted and the pawl and ratchet again cause the turret to rotate to a third position with the plugging ram set for operation. As the cam continues to rotate the ram comes into alignment with the perforation of the casing and forces a plug made of lead or other suitable material into the perforation. With complete retraction of the ram an automatic shut-off switch stops the motor operating the mechanism and then the apparatus may be raised from the well.

For better explanation, reference is made herein to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is an elevational view partly in section of a machine constituting an embodiment of the vinvention showing the disposition of the machine in a well; n

Figure 2 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation taken on the line 2--2 of Figure l;v

Figure 3`is a horizontal sectional View taken on the line 3-3 of Figure l;

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional View partly in elevation taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 1;

Figure 5 is anenlarged vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the upper portion of the machine;

Figure 6 is an enlarged Vertical sectional View partly in elevation of the lower portion of the machine;

Figure 7 is a horizontal view partly in section of the sample cup taken on the line 1-'-1 of Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a horizontal view partly in elevation of the turret head in .the retracted position, taken on the line 8-8 of Figure l;

Figure 9 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation of the turret head with the drill bit 4 in the advanced position;

Figure l0 is a horizontal sectional view partly in` elevation of the turret head with the auger bit in the advanced position;

Figure 11 is a horizontal sectional View partly in elevation of the turret head with the plugging ram in the advanced position; Figure 12 is a vertical sectional .View partly in elevation of the auger bit in the retracted posi- Y tion; Y

plugging Figure 17 is an enlarged elevational view of the ram slot in the casing of the turret head; Y Y Figure 18 is a perspective view of the sleeve for the-auger bit;

Figure 19 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation of the cam mechanism taken on the VFigure 20 is an enlarged plan view of the cam y removed from the Figure19;

Figure 21 is a verticalsectional view of the cam taken on the line 2l-.210f Figure 20;

Figure 22 is a horizontal sectional'view partly infelevationlin the retracted position together with the advanced position shown in dottedlines` taken on line 22-22 of Figure 6;

Figure 23 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation taken on the line 23--23 of Figure 6;

Figure 24 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation of the pawl and ratchet showing the means for actuating the pawl taken on the line 24-24 of Figure 6;

Figure 25 is a horizontal sectional view partly in elevation of the pawl and ratchet taken on the line 24-24 of Figure 6;

Figure 26 is a vertical sectional View partly in elevation of the pawl and ratchet taken on the line 26-26 of Figure 25;

Figure 27 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation taken on the line 21-21'of Figure 25;V

Figure 28 is a vertical sectional viewV partly in elevation taken on the lines 28-28 oi Figure 24; and

Figure 29 is a schematic wiringV diagram.

Attention is directed more particularly to Figure 1 in which a soil sampler is generally indicated at 30, located within a well casing 32. This embodiment of the invention comprises a supporting unitgenerally indicated at 33 including a cylindrical housing 34, an electric motor 36, a motive means generally indicated at 39, a turret head- 40, and a lock brake 42. An aperture 44 is disposed in the housing 34 at the level of the turret head 40. At the top of the housing a bail 45 is suspended on the end of a chain or cable 41 of a hoist not shown in the drawing. Under the bail attachment is the electric motor 36 which operates the device.l In Figure the motive means 33 beneath the motor comprises a drill drive shaft 48 and a cam drive shaft 50, both of which are journaled in bearings 52 attached to support members 55 of the housing. A reduction gear 56, giving approximately a 2:1 ratio, meshes with a` pinion '58 on the end of the motor shaft (see also Fig.

3.).. As shown in Figures 2 and 5, the shaft 50 is driven by a drive take-or shaft 60 mounted in the housing 34. Power is conveyed from the shaft 1S-by means of a worm 64 and worm wheel 66 onV the take-off shaft 00. Another worrn. 66 on the shaft 6i) engages the worm wheel 10 on the shaft 50,. By this gearing the speed of the shaft 501 is. established at .78 R. P. M. Referring` now to Figures 5V and 6, Lthe shafts 43 vand 59 are connected by means of universal joints 12 and 1'4l to. elongated shafts 16, and 16, the lower ends of which are attached to universal joints 80 and 32', respectively. Centrally of the shafts 16 and 18 are slip joints 84 and 8,6, respectively. The lower portions of the universal joints 80Y and. 82 are aixed tojshafts S8 and 90 which arejournal'ed' to a vreciprocating mechanism generally indicated at 92'.

The reciprocating mechanism 92 comprises a cam. 94 integralv with aspur gear 95 ,which engages a gear 96 on the shaft 90, a frame 98, a cam |00 integral with a spur gear |0| which engages a pinion1|02 on vthe lower end ofthe shaft 90 (see alsoA Fig. 23), and cam guides |04. and |06 attachedto the housing. With respect to the Y designA of the cam 94v and the spur Vgear 95, reference is madeto Figures and 21. As shown in Figure 19, the cam 94 is contained in a cam housing |08 and a housing plate ||0 attached to said housing by means of screws ||2. The cam housing |06 is pivoted to the housing 34 at a point H4. (see also Figure 6),. In order to guide the direction. of reciprocation, four slide bars ||6 are welded parallel with each other to the housing 34; (see also Figures 6 and 22). In Figure 22 each slide bar ||6 is provided with t a slide-block ||8 slidable thereon and which lis' attached by means of bolts |20 to the frame 98. The shaft is journaled to two pillow blocks |22 which are bolted to the frame 98. In Figure 6, the shaft 88 is separated from the cam 94 and the spur gear 95 by means of a sleeve` bearing |24, and from the frame 98 by a bea-ring |26 which also separates the. frame from the spur gear 95. A bearing |28 separates the frame 98 from the shaft 88 and the spur gear |0I.

In conjunction with the reciprocating mechanism 92 aV pawl |30 and a ratchet |32 operate the turret head 40. Figure 24 shows that the pawl |30 isy piyoted by a pin |34 to a sliding for the plate- |36 ina directionk parallel withv the bars i6. The pawl |30containsa triangular recess |42, a catch surface |44, and a safety Y The ratchet |32 which isv journaled about the shaft 86 and within the cam: |90, as shown in Figure 27, contains three ratchet teethv |41, |49 and |49; spaced 934', 93 and 174, respectively, asshown in Figure 24. An indexing pin |50 is affixed to and extends perpendicularly from the shank of the cam |09 as shown in Figure 27. To the ratchet |32 is attached a switch pin |51. as shown` in Figures 2g. and. 27;.v On' the plate |36 there is disposed a switch |52; with a switch lever |53. Normali-yl the switch is spring-biased in theV closed` position. The pawl is urged against the ratchetv bymeans; of a fiat spring |54 which is rlxed to the plate |36 by the pins |55 and |56. Within the ratchet |32 the shaft 88 is separated therefrom by asleeve bearing |51 which also separates theV shaft rom the spur gear |01y above theY ratchet. Figure 6. at the top of the ratchet |32 a washer bearing |556 separates the cam |00. Inv addition,y a sleeve bea-ring |59fseparatesvthe=shanl of camn |90v and the shank of the ratchet |52.

Thev turret head.y casing generally indicated at 40 in. Figure l, is shown i-n'vertical cross-section` in Figure 6. It is secured tothe lower end of theratchet |32 to which is screwed at |60 a cover-plate |62. ApproximatelyV three-quarters of the verticalsurface of the side: walls ofv the turret head isa cylindrical casing |64 and the remainder a-at back plate- |66- both of whichI are secu-red to the casing cover |62' by 4screws |66' and to an underplate |10.- bythel screws; |12. A. head brace |14 supportingl the baclrplate |66- by the screw-s |16 is attached,v to the coverplate |62 by two screws |16 and. tothe under-Y plate |19 by twoscrews |00.

About..l the periphery,r of the casing |64 are the. operating par-ts` ofthe turret head' (Figure 8)..

They compri-se al drill bit |82, an auger bit |823v and a plugging' ram |66 'with af lead plug` |81 lodged therein. The drill bit |82 iis journaled both at; the shankY in an annularbearing |88,v

outside dia-meter from that. of the; working end.

of the bit to the end which is journaled inr theY hea-dY brace |14. vThe dril-lbit |82 is driven by a bevel gear 200, attachedfthereto, and'` journaled InY Y ofthe gear 200.

f |64 and is pivoted to plate |10 by a pin 242.

the lower end of the-lever 236 is a roller 244 tween plate |66 andhead brace |14 cover upper and lower portions, respectively, of the periphery gear 208 on `the lower end of the shaft 88. A

This gear meshes with a bevel.

peg gear 2|6 is secured to the shank of the drill bit |82v adjacent the `shoulder |96.

In thesame horizontal plane the auger bit |84 is disposed 98 from the drill bit |82fand174 from the ramming plug |86 correspondingrto the distances between the teeth in theratchet |82.

In Figure 8, the auger bit |84 is journaled to a bushing 2|2 whi-ch is screwed into a threaded aperture 2|4 in the casing |64. A peg gear 2|6 transmits power to the auger bit |84 from the peg gear2l0. As indicated in Figure 13 the shank of the auger bit |84 contains a shoulder 228 Y ure 18) which is secured against the shoulder 220 on the shank by an annular screw cap 224. In

this manner a uniform surface is presented by the outer diameters of the shank, the thrust bearing 222 and the screw cap 224 to the inner diameter of the bushing 2|2. Within the shank of the auger bit |84 is a longitudinal keyway 226 which is open to the end opposite the auger. Into the keyway ts a Ykey shaft 228 which is slidably disposed therein and which has an outer' end integral with the peg gear 2|6. The bushing` 212 is designed with. a longitudinal slit 230 at' the bottom (Figure 16). A support member 232 of the thrust bearing 222 ts theslit 230 (Figure'18).'A slot 234 extends vertically in the member 282 and member 232 is attached to a lever 236 (Figure 13) by a pin 238 traveling in slot 234 and secured to the lever. The lever 236 fits into a slot 240 in the plate and the casing At attached to the lever by a Din 246. A'wire clip 248 is provided at the lower end of the support member 232 to which is attached la tension spring 250, vthe other end of which is affixed to the underplate |10 at 252.

The plugging ram generally indicated at |86 y as shown in Figure 13 is journaled in a bearing 254 which is screwed into a Vslot 256- (Figure 17) in the casing |64. The slot is situated on the same horizontalplane as the drill bit |82 and theauger bit |84. ram comprises an annular member 253 withtwo support members 260 and 262. .Themember 262 contains a slot 264 in which fits a set pin 266 attachedto the bearing 254. Around the lead plug |81 is an annular bushing 261 which is disposed within the annular member 258. The members 260 and 262 on either side'of Ythe bearing 254 are designed to t the slot 256 (Figure Referring to Figure 6,.the turret head is supported by a supporting member 268 which. is screwed into an underplate 210 at 212.

plate |10. Above the underplate 210 is asample cup 211 which is situated'adjacent the housing 3 '4 'and directlybelow the aperture 44 (Figure 1).

As shown invFigure 14, theA shoe 218 faced with a brake lining 280, a solenoid 282, and a support member 284. The support. member 284 is secured tothe underplate 210 by, bolts 286. Between the support member 284 and thebrake shoe 218-is a lever 288 to whi-ch is se-` cured aV tension spring 290 on the lower end of the solenoid 282. `The lever is attached to the l support member 284 by a pin 292 and to the brake shoe 218 .by a pin 294.(Figure 4).

The invention is wired according to the schel matic diagram in Figure 29.l The solenoid 282 i and the motor 36 are connected to a knife switch 286 and a two-way knife switch 298, respectively,A at the well surface. In one position of the switchA 298, the switch |52 is used to automatically shut l loff the motor 36 at the completion of the sam.

pling cycle. In the second position of the switch 298 the switch |52 is by-passed. Between these positions the switch is off. f

Opration switch 296 is closed toactuate the solenoid 282 whichvlocks the brake 42 againstthe well casing 32. The switch 288 is then closed in the manual position to Icy-pass the automatic switch |52. As shown in yFigure 1, the motor 36 operates the entire mechanism. The mechanical power from the motor is transmitted through the motive means generally indicated at 38 to the turret head 40 and to the cams 94 and |00. The shaft 16l directly drivesthedrills |82 and |84 -in the turret head 40. When the sampler is in operation the drills rotate continuously though they are used separately in the operation. The shaft 16 also rotates the turrethead 40 intermittently by the thrust created upon the gear 200 and by the gear 208, the direction of rotation being the same as that of the shaft. The clutch mem- -bers V204 and v206 prevent the turret head from The shaft 1,8, which operates the cams 94 Y and |00, derivesfits power from the shaft 48 by means of the take-off shaft 60 togetherwith the set of worms and gears concomitant therewith as shown in Figure 2. Referring to Figure 6 dent that the Vdrive from the shaft 90 is trans- Below the underplate 210 is the lock brake gen-vl mitted simultaneously through the spur gear 86 and the pinion |02, respectively, to the gear 65 of the cam94land' tothe gear |0| of the cam,l

|00. Since the gears 95 and- |0| rotate at the` same speed and since the cams 94 and |00 are set in phase with each other, the reciprocating mechanism 92 is forced to move backward andv forward alternately between the limitsV of the cams, 'causing'the drill bit |82 or therauger bit |84 or the plugging ram |86, whichever is in the working position, to advance and retract from the well casing 32. Thel direction of reciprocaton is maintained by the four slide bars ||6 on which the reciprocating mechanism 82` is .mounted as shownin -Figure'22. Inf this figure the advanced position of the vmechanism is in' dicated by the dotted lines.

Y The cam V84' ro` tates within the. cam housing |08 andthe hous-` ingplate |10. The cam housing |08-is pivoted erally indicated Yat'42, which comprises a,brake'75 Thus, thehousing glides horizontally as the cam' rotates. iperm'itting .the shaft'ft to reciprocate forward and backwardalternatelyin a straight line. -Because the action of reciprocation-shortens and lengthens fthe shafts "It and Te, 'the slip joints T84 :and 86, respectively, vare :provided for compensation. As it frotates between Ithe cam .guides mil .and H56, as shown vin Figure 23, the :cam 'lilo ,forces the shaft 88 to reciprocate in the same mannerthat the cam 'et acted upon it,` namely, ina straight line.

Closely associated with the reciprocating action .of vtheecams is'the action of the .pawl i3d and the .ratchet |372. `Referring first to Figure 2li, these :parts vare shown .in :the surroundings in .which Y.theyfunction. As .the cam it@ 'travels in av clockwise direction, the indexing V.pin lii attached to theshanlroi the Vcam is brought in Contact .with :the pawl and forces it away from the ratchet. This :action disengages the pawl catch It with the ratchet tooth it? and permits the ratchet iii-2 to rotate 93 until the ratchet tooth its .contacts the pawl catch lil-3. The ,reason .that .the patvl is .able to catch oncoming Vratchet tooth ilil is 'indexing pin hifi, continuing to move clockwise after ren leasing the ratchet tooth ili'l, confronts the recess lt' in the pawl, which permits the tension spring lid/ to urge the'pawlagainst the ratchet. The new position is shown Figure and .the cross-sectional view in Fig are As mentioned abovethe ratchet movement is intermitf tent, consisting or ithreerelatively fast travels between the ratchet teeth. Since it is not feasible to have `,the ratchet turning continuously, itis notgeared .directly to either shaft t3 or 9B. VRather-the ratchet movement is dependent upon the continuously rotating gear` 258 which provides a thrust `upon the turret lhead housing through the -bevel gear 23S. With the thrust acting uponthe housing continuously, it is ,evident that lonly when the pawl its is disengaged from a `ratciriet .tooth are the turret .head yand ratchetpermitted'to rotate. 'it should'bepointed out that in the event the spring ii vvJfails, the

itis evident rthat the ratchet. tooth itl would have lcornronteol the safety catch it before the 'ratchet tooth |48 traveled past the .pawl catch |134 had the spring i513 failed.

Due to the fact that the ratchet i3d makes one complete -turn or cycle per sample, it is possible to shut oir the motor automatically at the end of the cycle. Referring` to Figures 24and 27'the location ofthe switch pin it! with regard to the ratchet |32 and the switch [52 can be fixed in mind'. In -Figures 24 and 28 the indexing pin |50 is shown moving the cam away from the ratchet tooth i'lL/l and it is evident that the switch pin yPil is removed from the switch |52. Figures 2'5and27 represent the situation immediately after the pawl has released the ratchet |32 permitting it'to travel through 93. Not only has the ratchet tooth |128 confronted the pawl catch Mil; but the switch pin |l has actuated the switch 'lever "1.53 thereby opening the circuit to uthe motor.v In order to start the motor .tt again it is necessary to throw the knife switch 298 to the manual position thereby Icy-passing the switch V|t2 (seeFigure 29). As the sampler continues'to operate with the switch 2.5.18 in' this position,'the"carn I makes a complete revolution, thereby-actuatingthe pawl |'3 again, and

. member .f2-it.

permitting the ratchet `|32 to:rotate.another 193. At the same time a switch pin [5| moves off the switch lever |53, closing the switch .|52 at which time the knife vswitch A2.556 may be returned tothe automatic position (see Figure 29).

When `the sampler is lowered into the well, the turret head generally indicated at 'Ml is in the position shown in Figure 6; that is, the drill bit lmi. 'is retracted and addressing the aperture lll in the housing 34. As the cams 'gli and mil move the mechanism from the retracted position, the `revolving drill bit |82 advances through theaperture ISL? and drills anaperture 36% in the well casing '32. Bythe time the drilling is completed, the cams have moved the turret head to the point of farthest advancement, as shown in Figure 9. During this movement the underplate Vit has glided over the ball bearing 2% which is situated'at the top of the support The `operation continues without pause and the mechanism retracts to 'the ycenter oi the rhousing. YThis position is again shown 'the'Figure 8. -Pit the saine time the pawl Ahas been actuated by the indexing pin i" on the cam and the ratchet tooth |439 has moved through 93 to confront the pawlcatch itil (see Figure 25), presenting the augerdrill for oper-ation as shown in :Figure l2. As the again advance the mechanism, the bit itil through the aperture IM in the housing and `into the aperture Sd in the well casing. .In order to extend the auger bit beyond the weil casingtZ, the .lever .1236 is actuated by the well casing, forcing .the vauger G and 13. At this point ythe cams have advanced the mechanism tothe limit and vbegin to retract. This releases Athe pressure on the lower end of the .lever 235 and permits the'tension spring A2.5i? to draw the auger .bit back into'the bushing 2| t. At the same time a sample ci soil 3&2 is Vdrawn into the housing and drops into the sample cupZl'i. ris-the position of full retraction is approached the indexing pin {5|} again Aactuates the .pawl 136 permitting the ratchet |32 to rotate through 17.4 until .the ratchettooth 'itl confronts the pawlv-catch Nt (Figures 24 .and 25),. 'Theaturretihead now advances `with .theplugging ram '118e addressing the apertures it and 39S. When the annular member 258 yconfronts the well casing .around the aperture :adi it remains :fixed .and the .bearing 254 together with the set pin :2&5 continue to advance between .the support members 22B-fand Zit, thereby forcing :the plug |81 into theaperture .Bilt 'or the casing (Figure .11). Upon full retraction of the mechanism the indexing ,pin i5@ again '.trips .the pawl itil (FigureZfi) yandthe ratchet .tooth |128 travels 'through 1.93 to meet the .pawl catchilfili. Meanwhile the :switch `pin |51 breaks the circuit .through `the motor as it contacts theswitch lever vl-:'1.3.of switch .1.5.2. The mechanism stops operating and the turret head is positionedias. representedzby the.zFigure-8. By opening :the switch 2st, the brake :.42 is .released and vthe sampler vmay be raised tout .of 'the well,

and the sample i3d? removed from the .sample cup .217.

It is .to be pointed'out that there are three phases of motion Within -the mechanism .itself. Referringto Figure vl, the verticalsection between .the-,support member 26S and the upper universaljoints `il .and .74 have a continual reciprocating motion between the points of farthest advancement and retraction. 'The vertical sectionbetweenthe ratchet '|32 andthe uppercam i "94 is both rotating and reciprocatingcontinually.

Finally, within the turret head the drills not only revolve and reciprocate continually,vbut they rotate intermittently betweenieach operation.

It Will be apparent to'those skilled in the art that these and other modications may be made Without departing from the-,scope of the-.inven tion' 'as setf'orth 'in vthe" appended claims; "i What is claimed is: Y 1. A device for obtaining soil samples from the side Walls ofvvvells encased in pipe ycompr-isl auger :bit fori extra4 on :which thefbits d ram are mounted radially in aVV plane nor al v`to the. ax'

lcontaining jtheturret therein, "said housing having an aperture at the'` level of theturret, mot ve means operatively connected 0tothe bits forffro- 1 .ing a drill bit for boring ahole in thepiparan c auger bit for extracting soil specimens through the hole, a ram for plugging thehole'mounting means including a turret on which said bits and ram are mountedradially thereon, asupporting unit including a housing havingfan aperture at the level of turret and motive means operatively 'connected tothe bits for rotating them about their respective axes, motive means operatively connected to the turret for reciprocating it to and from the aperture, and motive means operatively connected to the turret for successively actuating the drill bit, the auger bit and the ram in alignment With the aperture.

2. A device for obtaining soil samples from the side Walls of Wells encased in pipe comprising a drill bit for drilling a hole in the-pipe, an

' auger bit for extracting a soil specimen through Y the hole, a ram for plugging the hole, a turret Von which the bits and ram areV mounted radially vin a plane normal to the axis of rotation of said y.

turret, a supporting unit including a cylindrical housing containing the turret therein, said hous- Y ing having an aperture at the level of the turret, motive means operatively connected to the bits for rotating them about theirV respective axes, a cam connected to said means for reciprotatinglthem about theirresp'ective. axes, means including a revolvable' cam A,andy being. connected to said motive means,forjreciprocatingthe turret tol'an'd from v,theaperture, land' means including a pawl and a revolvable ratchetcooperating therewith and being connected to said cam andto said turret for successively presenting the Y drill bit, the auger, and the rami-in alignment f o with the aperture upon successive revolutions of` operatively connected to the bits for rotating them about their respective axes, means including a revolvable cam and being connected to said motor for reciprocating vthe turret to and fromV the aperture at a rate of speed slower than that of the rotating fbits, and means including a Vpavvl and a revolvable ratchet cooperating therewith and being connected to said cam and to said turret for successively presenting the drill bit, the

eating the turret to and from the aperture, said Y means being operatively connected to the tur'- ret for successively actuating the drill bit, the

Vauger bit and the ram at the aperture.

3. A device forobtaining soil samples from the side Walls of Wells encased in pipe comprising a supporting unit adapted to be inserted into a pipe, a turret head in the housing, said housing having an aperture at the level of the turret head, bore means for periorating the pipe, sampler means vfor extracting soil specimens from the exterior of the pipe, the bore means and the sampler being mounted on the turret head, motive means operatively connected to the turret for reciprocating it to and from the aperture in said housing, and motive means operatively connected to the bore means and the sampler means for successively actuating them through including a housing 4. A device for obtaining soil samples from the e side Walls of Wells encased in'pipe comprising a supporting unit including a housing, a turret head in ,the housing, said housing having anYK aperture at the level of the turret head, bore` means for perforating the pipe, sampler means for extracting soil specimens from the exterior of the pipe, plugging means for filling-the perforation in the pipe, all of said means being f mounted on the turret head, motive means opauger, andthe ram in alignment with the aperr ture upon successive .revolutions of the cam.

7. A device for obtaining soil samples from the side Walls of Wells encased in pipe, comprising a drill bit'for drilling a hole in the pipe, anv auger bit for extracting a soil specimen through thev hole, a ram for plugging the hole, a turret on which the bits and ram are mounted radially in l a plane normal to the axis of the turret, avsupporting unitincluding a cylindrical'housing,r containing the turret therein, said housing having an aperture at the level of the turret, a motor operatively connected to the bits for rotating them Yabout their respective axes, means includinga a revolvable ratchet cooperating therewith andv being connected to said cam and to said turret for successively presenting the drill bit, the auger, and the ram in alignment with the aperture upon successive revolutions of the anti means adjacent the ratchet and actuated thereby for automatically stopping t'ie motor upa: in? revolution of the ratchet.

8. VA device for obtaining soil samples from the side Walls of wells encased in pipe,` comprisinrr a drill bit for drilling a hole in the pipe, an auger bit for extracting a soil specimen through the hole, a ram for plugging the hole, a turret rotatable` about its vertical axis on which turret the bits and ram are'mounted radially in a plane normal to the axis of the turret, a supporting unit including a tcylindrical housing containing Y the turret therein, said housing having an aperture at the level of the turret, an electrical motor operatively connected to the bits for rotating them about their respective axes, means for re- Y maaien'fsiecimeii'uiibush l the hole, a ram .forjplugg'ngthe'.hole,' afturret the .turret, a Asupporting'unitincluding a cylindrical'y housing ciprocating the turret to and from the aperture y at a rate of speed `slower than `that of the rotatcation of the turret, and means including a pawl and a revolvable ratchet cooperating therewith and operatively connected to the motor and to the cam for successively presenting the drill bit, the auger bit, and the ram for operation in alignment with the aperture after successive revolutions of the cam, an electrical means including a switch adjacent the ratchet and actuated thereby `for automatically stopping the motor upon one revolution of the ratchet, and a lock brake includingr a brake shoe and solenoid so attached to the housing as to secure the device l 5 at a given location within the casing.

HARLEY E'. HYLBAK.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS G Number Name Date 2,306,670 Sutliff r Dec. 29, 1942 2,372,875 Benke Apr. 3, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2306670 *Aug 19, 1939Dec 29, 1942Sutliff Wayne NWell casing perforating device
US2372875 *Jun 6, 1944Apr 3, 1945Atlantic Refining CoCoring device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2896913 *Oct 10, 1956Jul 28, 1959Angledrill CorpApparatus for drilling lateral openings in well bores
US3079999 *May 10, 1957Mar 5, 1963Otis Eng CoOil well service tool assembly
US7347284Oct 20, 2004Mar 25, 2008Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for hard rock sidewall coring of a borehole
US20060081398 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 20, 2006Abbas ArianApparatus and method for hard rock sidewall coring of a borehole
DE1262937B *Nov 27, 1964Mar 14, 1968American Coldset CorpVorrichtung zum Herausschneiden und Aufnehmen langer Formationsproben aus der Wand eines Bohrloches
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/51, 173/50, 166/66.4, 166/55.1, 175/98, 175/104, 173/19
International ClassificationE21B49/00, E21B49/06
Cooperative ClassificationE21B49/06
European ClassificationE21B49/06