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Publication numberUS2646588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1953
Filing dateJan 21, 1948
Priority dateJan 21, 1948
Publication numberUS 2646588 A, US 2646588A, US-A-2646588, US2646588 A, US2646588A
InventorsFranz Wagner
Original AssigneeCedar Corp N O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient mophead structure and handle mounting
US 2646588 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. WAGNER 2,646,588

RESILIENT MOPHEAD STRUCTURE AND HANDLE MOUNTING July 28, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 21, 1948 F. WAGNER July 28, 1953 RESILIENT MOPHEAD STRUCTURE AND HANDLE MOUNTING Filed Jan. 21, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 28, 1953 RESILIENT MOPHEAD STRUCTURE HANDLE MOUNTING Franz Wagner, Chicago;:1ll., assignor to O-Cedar Corpn, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application January 21, 1948, Serial No. 3,495

' 1 This invention relates to a mop structure. The invention is particularly useful in connection with a dust mop, and similar mops. In the handling of mops, such as, for example, a dust mop, it is dimcult to keep the mophead properly positioned upon the floor, with the nose or forwar portion of the mop tightly engaging the floor so that it may be directed readily into corners and places difiicult of access. If spring means are'employed in conjunction with the handle for exerting pressure against the top of the mop, the resulting structure allows lateral play and the mophead is difficult to control because of such lateral play.

An object of the present invention is to provide a mophead structure in which a resilient body is employed to integrate the parts of the head into a, firm and easily controlled body, while at the same time providing a resilient connection between the handle and the head for efiecting accurate control thereof. Yet, another object is to provide a mophead and handle connection therefor in-which a resilient member joins the head to the'handle, the resilient member, however, later- 10 Claims. (Cl. 15-147) ally engaging the walls of the head so as to permit y relatively high flexibility, and then sharply reducing such flexibility after a predetermined limit of sweep is reached. A still further object i to provide a-resilient integrator device employed as a central portion of a mophead for uniting the parts of the head firmly and rigidly in the central structure, while providing a flexible connection between the central structure and a mop handle. A still further object is to provide a resilient mophead structure in which mop-holding prongs are embedded, th prongs extending at a spaced relation from themophead, and the head being provided with a handle-receiving socket resiliently connected to the structure in which such prongs are embedded. Other specific objects and advantages will appear as the specification proceeds.

The invention is illustrated, in a single embodiment, by the accompanying drawings, in Which- Figure 1 is a perspectiv view of a mop structure embodying my invention; Fig. 2, a top plan view of the structure on a reduced scale; Fig, 3, an enlarged transverse sectional view, the section being taken as indicated at line 3-3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4, a longitudinal sectional view, the sec-'- tion being taken as indicated at line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

2 Fig. 5, a broken detail sectional view showing the handle socket in raised position; Fig. 6, a broken bottom plan view; Fig. 7, a plan view of a modified form of mop structure embodying m invention; Fig. 8, a plan View of the metal-retaining member employed in the structure shown in Fig. '7 and Fig. 9, a transverse sectional View, the section being taken as indicated at line 99 of Fig. 7.

In the illustration given, iii designates a central resilient body formed of rubber, or any other suitable r silient material. The body I9 has the general shape of a shield, and is provided along its sides and front portion with a recess I l adapted to receive a plate l2. The plate l2 has an inner downwardly-flanged end, which is tightly received within the recess I I of the resilient block it. The block NJ has, also embedded therein metal prongs l3, which extend outwardly around th plate 52 a spaced distance and terminat near the forward end of the plate in slightly spaced-apart relation. Upon the free ends Id of the prongs are drawn the sleeve memberldto which strands i6, forming the mop body, are secured. The outer end of the plate I2 is preferably turned downwardly and outwardly at I! so as to provide a support for the inner surface of the taped sleeve l5.

The resilient body It is slitted fromits rear side inwardly a substantial distance at spaced which is integrally formed. ahandle socket 2t.

With the structure shown, it will be noted that the tops of the sides 21 of the neck member [9 engage the inner sides of the body l8 so that lateral movement of the flexible neck I9 is restricted, thus giving effective control of the lateral movements of the mophead.

The socket portion it is provided with an opening 22 adapted to receive a mop handle. The opening 22 may be circular in shape or, if desired, elliptic in shape, depending upon the type of handle which is to be employed.

The neck l9, as illustrated more clearly in Figs.

' the point illustrated in Fig. 5, and at that point,

where the top edges of the material meet each other, thus bridging the tops of the slots, further upward movement is-less easy. Thus-after the handle 24 has been .raisedto the position indicated in Fig. 5, furtherraising of the handlewill impose much greater pressure upon the forward portion of the mophead. It will be understood that such slots may be of any desired number and location, and the shape of the slotsmay be varied depending upon the material used and the desired pressure which it is desired to place upon the nose or forward portion of the mop.

Operation In the operation of the mop, the mop handle is placed within the socket 22, which is preferably slightly smaller than the handle so that the handle is tightly held within the socket. The handle is then raised, the slots 23 permitting an easy movement up to the point at which the mopping operation is conveniently carried on. At this point, the upper slots are bridged over, as illustrated in Fig. 5, and further elevation of the mop places greater pressure upon the mophead. The mophead may be moved back and forth while the neck flexes readily. The relatively wide neck Hi, which engages the adjacent walls of the resilient member (0, enables the mophead to be guided laterally without play between the parts, while at the same time permitting easy flexing in the connection between the handle socket and the resilient body. When released, the resilience of the neck 19 brings the handle 24 into horizontal alignment with the body l0, and the mop may be stored in this position. Even if the mop should be stored in a closet resting upon the nose of the head, the resilience of the neck It maintains the handle 24 in alignment with the head.

The resilient body Hi forms a firm integrating structure by which the mophead parts are united, while at the same time permitting the slight yielding of such parts under blows, collisions, etc. The result is that the structure is cushioned by its center against violent blows against objects engaged by the mophead so that, by reason of such resilience and the padded sleeve 55 of the mop, no damage Or injury is done to such ob jects. At the same time, the operator has com plete control of the mophead and is able to move it accurately into dimcult corners, the resilient neck I9 holding the nose of the mop downwardly against the floor as it enters such corners, etc.

In forming the central resilient body it, the prongs I3 may be placed in position within the mold and the molded body cast in the form illustrated. In the resulting structure, the prongs i3 provide a rigid frame extending along the walls iii of the recess and causing the flexing joint between the handle socket and the body iii to occur in the forward portion of the body iii, thus directing pressure exerted by the raising of the handle against the forward portion of the mophead.

The positioning of the prongs 13 along the recess further maintains such walls in true alignment and facilitates the easy swinging of the neck i9 between such rubber-covered prongs.

The plate [2 is preferably formed of metal, plastic, or other suitable rigid material, and the inner edge of the plate provides a frame which looks the edge portions of the resilient body against flexing whereby the flexing of the structure is concentrated within the forward portion of body in where it is most effective for the purposes above described.

In the modification illustrated in Fig. 7, the mop body 25 is formed in its entirety of rubber or other resilient mold material and is equipped with a single piece metal-retaining member 25 embedded in the body 25. A fabric sheath 2! is received about the retaining member 26. If de sired, the outer edge of the rubber body 25 may be equipped with vertical ribs or with longitudinal ribs for the better gripping of the fabric sheath 2'! and to prevent the fabric sheath from working off of the retaining member 28 when the mop is shaken or otherwise used.

The mo socket 28 is connected by a flexing neck and shaking device 29 integrally with the body 25. I

The socket and body provide a non-scratch buffer or protector which prevents injury to furniture when the mop is brought into contact therewith.

In all of the modifications, the flexing neck serves the very important function of keeping the toe of the mop downwardly against the floor and thus insuring the contact of the mop with the floor when the same is projected into corners and other dimcult places.

While in the foregoing specification, I have set forth a specific structure in great detail for the purpose of illustrating an embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that such details of structure may be varied widely by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of my invention.

v I claim:

1. In a mop structure, a central resilient flexible body to serve as a shock absorber, prongs fixed in said body and extending laterally and forwardly thereof, a fabric body supported upon said prongs, said resilient body having a central recess extending rearwardly and. an integral neck portion in the recess and extending in the plane of said body and equipped with an integral socket providing with said body a non-scratch buffer, and a handle received within said socket, said neck arcuately flexing when said handle is raised or lowered.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which said neck is provided with slots to facilitate said flexing.

3. The structure of claim 1 in which said neck is provided with slots which extend transversely of said neck.

4. In a mop structure, ,a central pliable elastic body equipped with a peripheral recess, a plate extending about a portion of said body and having an edge received within and tightly held in which enlarges rearwardly and outwardly and is adapted to be received snugly within said peripheral recess of the rubber body, said rubber body having at its rear a recess and a resilient flexible neck in said recess and integrally joining the forward portion of said rubber body, means for securing a handle to said neck, and a pair of prongs having portions extending parallel with and adjacent said recess in the rear portion of said molded body and then xtending outwardly and forwardly of said plate.

6. In a structure of the character set forth, a thick rubber body having a recess extending rcarwardly and a thick integral neck received within said recess and integrally formed at its forward end with said body, said neck near its point of junction with said body being provided with a plurality of spaced transverse slots whereby said neck may be flexed upwardly and downwardly, the side walls of said neck during said flexing engaging the side walls of the recessed body, and a pair of prongs embedded within said rubber body and running parallel with and adjacent said recess in the body, said prongs being extended outwardly and forwardly of said body for receiving a fabric mop structure.

7. In a structure of the character set forth, a resilient flexible body having a recess extending rearwardly and a resilient flexible neck in said recess and integrally joining the forward portion of said body so that said neck may be flexed upwardly and downwardly, said neck normally lying in the plane of said body when unflexed and the side walls of said neck during said flexing engaging the side walls of the recessed body whereby lateral flexing of said neck is restrained, and retaining means embedded within said body and running parallel with and adjacent said recess in the body and having prong means extending outwardly and forwardly of said body for receiving a fabric mopstructure.

8. The structure of claim 7 in which said neck is provided with slots which extend transversely across the upper and lower surfaces of said neck to facilitate said flexing.

9. In a mop structure, a resilient flexible body having a recess extending rearwardly and a resilient flexible neck in said recess and integrally joining the forward portion of said body so that said neck can be arcuately flexed upwardly and downwardly, said neck normally lying in the across the upper and lower surfaces of said neck to facilitate-said flexing. I

FRANZ WAGNER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 366,590 Lubin July 12, 1887 603,694 Kavanaugh May 10, 1898 1,289,010 Seghers Dec. 24, 1918 1,407,341 Veeck Feb. 21, 1922 1,420,180 Casmire June 20, 1922 1,577,774 Tarbox Mar. 23, 1926 1,586,337 Stockwell May 25, 1926 1,771,768 Brown July 29, 1930 2,185,873 Underhil1 Jan. 2, 1940 2,221,128 Bates Nov. 12, 1940 2,240,155 Closson Q. Apr. 29, 1941 2,242,543 Phipps May 20, 1941 2,323,031 Greenleaf June 29, 1943 2,559,722 Lindstrom July 10, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 349,212 Great Britain May 28, 1931 413,574 Great Britain July 19, 1934

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2727268 *Apr 25, 1951Dec 20, 1955Hucke Charles HHandled washing mops
US3395416 *Oct 3, 1966Aug 6, 1968Bissell IncMop with reversible disposable pad
US5406670 *Jul 20, 1993Apr 18, 1995Vining Industries, Inc.Dust mop
US6237182 *Apr 12, 2000May 29, 2001Simon Ralph CassarFlexible elastomer floor dust mop attachment
CN100571598CFeb 23, 2005Dec 23, 20093M创新有限公司Improved head for a strip mop
WO2005087076A1 *Feb 23, 2005Sep 22, 20053M Innovative Properties CoImproved head for a strip mop
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/147.2, 403/291, 15/229.7, 403/220
International ClassificationA47L13/20, A47L13/255
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/255
European ClassificationA47L13/255