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Publication numberUS2647306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1953
Filing dateApr 14, 1951
Priority dateApr 14, 1951
Publication numberUS 2647306 A, US 2647306A, US-A-2647306, US2647306 A, US2647306A
InventorsLandry William J
Original AssigneeJohn C Hockery
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can opener
US 2647306 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4, 3 v w. J. LANDRY 2,647,306

' CAN OPENER Filed April 14, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 4 TTORNEX a 4, 1953 w. J. LANbfiY 2,647,306

CAN OPENER Filed April 14, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

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1477 NEK Patented Aug. 4, 1953 CAN OPENER I William J. Landry, Blue Springs, M0,, assignorto John C. Hockery, Kansas City, Mo., trustee for Henry J. Talge and Foster L. .Talge Application April 14, 1951, SerialNo. 221,009 C v The present invention relates in general to can openers, and more particularly to can openers of the type utilizing a cutting wheel for removing the top of the can together with a feed' wheel or gear for rotating and driving the can relative to the cutting wheel during such removal. The present invention is an improvement on the can opener shown in my co-pending patent application "Serial No. 129,139, filed November 23, 194.9,now Patent No. 2,602,991.

As disclosed in my co-pending patent application referred to above, one form of can opener may provide a mechanism by which the feed wheel and cutting wheel are automatically advanced or retracted relative to each other to grip and puncture a can or to release the can depending upon the initial direction of rotation of the can opener operating handle.

It is an important object of my present invention to provide an improved form of can opener of the type referred to above and having means to facilitate the initial can gripping and puncturing operation to thus reduce the effort expended in operating the can opener.

In the preferred embodiment of my present invention, the rotary operating handle and associated operating mechanism are provided with an arrangement of clutch and gearing by means of which the cutting wheel is positively rotated for all rotary movements of the handle and including the period of time during which the feedv wheel and cutting Wheel are moved relative to each other to initially grip and puncture the can. Thus, the initial step of puncturing the can body is greatly facilitated since the cutting wheel-engages the can with a combined rotary and linear puncturing movement.

Another object of my present invention is to provide an improved form of can opener of the general type referred to above and having a modified operating mechanism by means of which the continued rotation of the operating handle in the selected direction to open the can is facilitated and obtained with a minimum of disturbing effects and noises.

A further object of my present invention is to provide a can opener of the type referred to and having simplified construction facilitating the initial assembly of the can opener and providing for automatic adjustment of the cutting 23 Claims. (01. 30- 9) described and having means to initiallyadjust the normal minimum spacing between the inner face of the cutting wheel and the outer face of the feed wheel tothus facilitate the assembly of' a can openerto the required manufacturing tolerances.

Still a further object of theinvention-is to provide a can opener having an improved form of can rest or shoulder for holding the can in pressure engagement with the can advancing wheel. v v V Other objects and advantages of myinvention will be apparent with reference to the following specification and drawings in which:

Fig. 1-is a side elevation ofthe-can opener'of my present invention as seen from the operating handle side, and with the parts in the can receiv ing position; I

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side elevation of the operating end of the can opener as seen from the opposite side to that of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the operating end of the can openerwith parts in position of Figs.

1 and -2 and partially in section to show further detail; 4 I

Fig. fl is a section onthe line 4-4 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig; 5 is a section-on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1 in the direction of the arrows;--

Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Fig.2 in thedirection. of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. l but showing the parts in the position assumed after puncturing and while gripping a can for rotary cutn 1 Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the parts in the position of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is an end view of the operating end of a can opener with the parts including the cutting wheel and feed wheel in theposition shown in Figs. 7 and 8; and I Fig. 10 is an exploded perspective assembly view to show all of the operating, parts of the can opener in their relative positions of assembly. Referring to the drawings, the numeral ,l0 identifies-the-main' body" of the can opener, the rear end l l of which maybe attached to a sup-- porting wall surface in any suitable fashion. The operating end of the can openermain body l0 asshown in Figures 2,3, 4 and 8 through 10 of the drawings is provided with an embossed portion 12 for supporting the i'nclineds'pindle l3 on which the cutting wheel I4 is rotatablyljour-j nalled. -The "cutting wheel"l4 may be secured on. the spindle 13 "by me'ans'of the-lock nut l5 as particularly shown in Fig. 4 of the drawings. In this connection it will be noted that the cutter wheel 14 is provided with a shank portion IE on which are splined a pair of driving gears l1 and I8 and the entire assembly is held in the desired axial relation on the spindle l3 by means of a coiled compression spring l9. It should now be evident.- that the cutter wheel M is rotatably mounted on the can opener main body [3 ina desired fixed axial position.

The feed wheel, operating handle and associated cam and eccentric driving mechanism, to be later described in detail, are all mounted on the subassembly plate 20. The-plate 23 is preferably of thin resilient material such as spring metal and is fastened to the main body H! at two spaced points 2] and 22 respectively. The sub assembly plate 20 may be secured at 2| and 22 in any suitable fashion such as by rivetsor the like, but in the embodiment of the invention, as

shown Figs. 2 and 3,.bolts 23 and 24 together with cup-shaped spring" 2'55 and 26. may be used. Since the. bolts 2'3 and: 24, as shown in Fig. ofthe drawings; are not-threaded to the mainbody member" IE, it should be. apparent that a limited separational movement between the subassembly plate 20 and the main body is permitted. When, in: the alternative; the. subassembly is riveted to the mainbody It, as previously mentioned:- a limited separational movement between the main body In and subassembly plate 20 may still take place due to the inherent springiness of the metal plate 23 which, as pointed out, is only secured to the main body' F0 at the two spacedpoints 2| and 22. Thus the spacing between the innerfaee of the cutting wheel "and the outer face of the feed wheel 30, which is carried by the subassembly'plate 20 in a manner to be further described in detail,

may be automatically varied within limits by theseparational movement of the body Hi and subassembly plate 20 as the can opener is used.

Toinitially determine or adjust the minimum spacingbetween the rear face of the cutting wheel 14 and the front face of the feed wheel at the time of assembly ofthecan opener, a set screw 21 and look not 23 may be secured to the main body l ll as shown in Figs. 2 and 6 of the drawings. By threading the set screw 21' into and through the'body' H), the end of the-set screw may be caused to abut the unperforated wall of the subassembly plate 23 to forcethe sobassembly plate 20 and main body f0 to-separate' by-a minimum amount determined by the threaded position of the set screw.

The feed wheel 33 is secured to the shaft 31 of the operating handle 32 and at the time of assembly is threaded at 33 on the shaft 31 and thereafter may be keyed to the shaft if desired by peening the protrudin end of'the threads 33 on the shaft 3|. As most clearly shown in Figs. 4 and 10 of the drawings, the shaft 3! is rotatably journalled in the bore 34 of the. rotatable plug member 35' having a circular shoulder portion 36' rotatablzy jomnalleol in the bore 3? of the subassembly piate. 20L The-phigrmernher 35 is provided a shank'portionlw which extends through the opening: 3.! oil the cam. plate 4-0. The cam plate 43 also has a= circuiarshoulder portion 4!: whichis adapted: to bc'journalled in the opening 3-1 to abut the shoulder portion 36 of the plug member 33 when. the can opener is assembled. The cam platelll andplug menu ber 35 are connected to tum together as a unit in any suitable fashion,- such as the-promotion of pin 42 into the opening 43 so that rotation of the cam plate causes a corresponding rotation of the plug member 35. It should also be noted that the bores 34 and 39 are eccentrically located with reference to the circular shoulders 36 and 4| and the bore 31 so that a rotation of the plug 35 and cam plate 43 causes the shaft: 3! and feed wheel. 30 to advance or retract with relation to the cutter wheel depending upon the relative eccentric positions of the members referred to.

Now with further reference to Figs. 2, 8 and 10 of the drawings, it will be noted that a peripheral portion of the plug member 35 is provided with, gear teeth 45 adapted to mesh with the cutter wheel driving spur gear l8 during the rotary movement of the plug member to advance or retract the feed wheel and cutter wheel relative to each other. Thus the cutter wheel 14 is positively rotated during the initial step of gripping and puncturing the can.

In order that continued rotation of the cutter wheel Hi. and driving gears ll and I8 may be had to open the can after the cutting wheel and feed wheel are brought together and after the rotation of the plug member 35 has been stopped in the position shown in Figs. '2 and 8 (wherein it will be noted that the shoulder of the cam plate 33 is adjacent the stop pin or lug 5| on the subassembly plate 20), a portion of the gear teeth 45 are removed at 46 to thus automatically disengage gear I8 from the plug 35. However; spur gear 41 which is keyed by the flat 48 to theshoulder 49 of the shaft 3| continues to rotate with the rotational movement of the operating handle 32 and engages with gear H of the cutter wheel l4 when the parts of the can opener are in the position shown in Figs. 8 and 9 with the feed wheel 39 and cutting wheel [4 brought together. It should thus. be apparent that the cutting wheel I4 is rotated either by the gear teeth 45 of the rotatable plug engaging with the spur gear l8 or by the spur gear 4'! engaging with the spur gear [1.

To cause a rotation of cam plate 40 and plug 35 in either direction during a portion of a corresponding-rotation of the handle 32 in either direction, a rotation responsive clutch device is provided. The cam plate 40 is formed with a slot portion 52 in its periphery. A spring pressed lever 53 (see Fig. 5) is pivoted at 54 on the operating handle 32 and its edge portion 55 may engage in the slot 52 during a selected period of angular movement of the handle 32 as will be further described. The subassembly plate 20 is provided with a raised cam portion 56 with which the lever 53 engages as the handle 32'is rotated thus to lift the edge portion 55 of the lever against the tension of spring 51 out of engagement with slot 52. The hub of the crank handle is provided with a welded on inner plate 58 carrying the shaft 3| and this has a portion containing a slot 59 which forms a guideway for the inner end of lever 53.

Interposed between the face of cam plate ll) and the inner plate 58 of the crank handle is a lost motion silencer disk 53 notched inwardly from one edge and having adjacent the notch an upstanding lug 62 extending int an aperture 53 in the plate 53; the latter aperture is suiiiciently larger than lug 62 to permit thelug to shift circumferentially a small amount in either direction relative to the crank hub.

Now, assuming the can opener parts to be the position shown in Figs. 1. to 4 with rotation of the handle in' a counter-clockwise direction prevented by reason of engagement of in a clockwise direction (Fig. 1) the cam plate and the plug 35 are similarly rotated by reason of the engagement of thehandle 1ever53 in camslot 52; also, the leading face of lever 53 bears against the edge 5| of the notch in the silencer disk causing it to turn with the handle; Clockwise rotation of the handle, cam plate 45, plug 35, and the silencer disk 60 continues during approximately 180 of angular rotation, in which time the feed wheel 33 is moved from'the position shown in Figs. 2 and 3 to the position shown in Figs. 8 and 9, causing the cutter wheel to puncture the lid of the can and causing the flange f the can to begripped'between the feed wheel and'cutter wheel. 'It'is important to note that during this first interval'of'movement, the cutter wheel is rotated due to the meshing of gear teeth 45 on the plug 35 with the teeth of spur gear I8; positive rotation of the cutter wheel during this interval materially reduces the resistance of the lid to puncturing and correspondingly reduces the amount of force'the operator must apply to the handle 32 in order to effect the initial penetration of the lid by the cutter wheel.

At the end of the first 180 of angular clockwise movement, the handle lever 53rides up on the cam 55 to lift the edge portion 55 of the lever out of slot 52 of the cam plate 40. With the lifting of lever 53 above the-level of the silencer disk at this point, rotation of the disk halts momentarily and as the clockwise rotation of handle 32 continues, lever 53 now passes over the edge of the disk to a position adjacent of cutting-Wheel l4.

10' projecting laterally-from the main body plate In which serves to maintain the-sideof the ean substantiallyvertical. Also in order to'hold the header flange of the'can in firmrpressure engagement with the feed wheel the can is urged downwardly by a spring loaded can rest, the construction of which may best be'appreciated from Figs. 2 and 6. Referring to the" latter figure',-it will be seen that the can rest comprises a pair of arms 12 and 13 extending loosely through slots I4 inan offset portion-of the main body plate It). Between the. arms-isa coiled compression spring 75 urging them apart; the arms are bent to form exterior shoulders 76 and interior shoulders 'Hwhich prevent them frommoving farther apart than shown under the influenc'e ofthe spring, but these shoulders will not prevent the arms from moving toward one another and compressing the spring. ."Thus, when the upper edge of the can abuts the lower arm 13and lifts it slightly, as it does when the can is lifted to lid severing position, spring 15 maintains a downward force on the can to h'oldthe flange or bead in tight pressure-engagement with the serratedfeed wheel as .to facilitate advancing cf the can relative to the cutter wheel. It should be understood that the plug member is rotatable and axially slidablethrough the bore or opening 80 of themain body member I!) so that with a separationalmo'vementof the main body member H3 and the subassembly plate 20, as previously described,- the outer face of the feed gear 30 will move away fromthe inner face Normally these two faces are close together -as indicated in Fig. .9, but

.. when, in the course of opening a can, the vertical seam in the side wall thereof passes between the two faces it induces the aforementioned the notch therein. As previously indicated, the

loss of motion between the silencer disk and the handle is limited to the amount of movement lug 62 enjoys in aperture 53, and accordingly,

as soon as the lever 53 advances past the notch in the silencer disk, the latter resumes rotation and thereafter continues to turn with the handle. During the ensuing clockwise rotation of the handle, lever 53 continues to rest on the surface of the silencer disk, and once in each revolution of the handle passes the slot 53 in cam plate without dropping thereinto.

The continued clockwise rotation of the handle of course also causes a rotation of feed wheel 35, spur gear 4?, and cutting wheel M to advance the can relative to the cutter wheel and would occur but for the silencer disk. It also should be borne in mind that after the first 180 of clockwise rotation of the handle from its start-;

ing position, the untoothed portion 46 of the plug 35 is opposite gear l8 thus disengaging the geared connection between the cutting wheel and the plug 35 for the continued clockwise rotation of the handle 32 while plug 35 and cam plate' lil' remain stationary in the position indicated in Fig. 8. 3

During the can opening operation the side wall of the can rides against the end of alug separational movement which allows the necessary give to permit the can seam to pass between the cutter wheel and the feed wheel without imposing any undue strain on the parts. Also, as previously indic'atedthe minimum spacing between the two faces "may readily be ad justed by means of the set screw 21 and lock washer'28.

To release the opened can, the handle 32 is merely rotated in the counter-clockwise"direction. Referring to Fig. 7, the lost motion silencer disk 6 0 remains stationary for a brief interval at the beginning of such rotation of the crank handle so-that lever 53passes over the edge 6| into the notch of the silencer disk and rests ,on the face of cam plate 40; as'soon as it passes over edge 6|, the trailing edge of aperture 63. in the hub'plate 58 (see'Fig'lO) engages lug B2 and thus causes the lost motion disk 60 'to .begin turning with the crank. When the crank turns through approximately counter-clockwise from the positionshown in'Fig. 7, lever 53 drops into notch 52 and causes the cam plate 45 and plug 35 then to turn with the crank through the ensuing 180 or until shoulder 64 engages stop pin 5!. The partsnow are back in the position illustrated by Figs. 1 to 4, fr0m' which it will be noted that the feed gear 35 is drawn downwardly from the cutter wheel so that the can flange may be withdrawn from between the two. The coiled compression'spring 82 encircling the crank shaft 31 between the silencer disk and the crank hub plate 58 urges the cam plate 4 0 against the face of the subassemblyplate 20 with sufiicient force that the friction between the two will prevent free frotatio'n of'the'cam plate 40; since the lev'er 53 is in notch 52- of thecam plate-this resistance d to free rotation 01. the latter will hold the crank in the position shown in Fig. 1 until it is manually turned in a clockwise direction by the 011- erator incident to inserting another can .in the can opener for the'purpose of severing the lid thereoL From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention is one well adaptedto attain all of the ends and objects hereinbeiore set forth together with other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the apparatus.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

Inasmuch as many possible embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A can opener comprising a body member, a rotatable cutting wheel carried by said body, a rotatable feed wheel, means to move said feed wheel towards said cutting wheel to grip and puncture a can, and gear means meshed throughout the movement of said feed wheel towards said cutting wheel for rotating both wheels during said movement.

2. A can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatably mounted on said member, an operating handle rotatably mounted on said member, a feed wheel connected for rotation with said handle, means associated with said handle during a first rotational movement thereof in a selected direction to move said feed wheel towards said cutting wheel, said first means also connecting said cutting wheel to be rotated by said handle during said first rotational movement, and second means connecting said cutting wheel to said feed wheel to be rotated by continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction.

3. A can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatabiy secured tosaid body member, a plug member rotatably mounted in a bore of said body member, a bore extending through said plug member and eccentrically positioned with respect to the bore of said body member. a rotatable operating handlehaving a spindle extending through said second bore, a feed wheel secured to said spindle to be rotated w th said handle, first gear means connecting saidplug member to said cutting wheel during the rotation of said plug to rotate said cutting wheel. clutch means connecting said handle to said plug to rotate said plug during a first portion of the rotation of said handle in a selected direction whereby the spindle and feed wheel are moved towards said cutting wheel, means to disconnect said clutch means during continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction, and second gear means connecting said feed wheel and said cutting wheel for rotation therewith after said clutch means is disconnected. v

4. A can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatably secured to said body member, a plug member rotatably mounted in a bore of said body member, a bore extending through said plug member and eccentrically positioned with respect to the bore of saidbody member, a rotatable operating handle having a spindle extending through said second bore, a teed wheel secured to said spindle to be rotated with said handle, first gear means connecting said plug member to said-cutting wheel during the rotation of said plug to rotate said cutting wheel, clutch means connecting said handle to said plug to rotate said plug during a first portion of the rotation of said handle in a selected direction whereby the spindle and feed wheel are moved towards said cutting wheel, means to disconnect said clutch means during continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction, and second gear means connecting said feed wheel and said cutting wheel for rotation therewith after said clutch means is disconnected, said first gear means being automatically unmeshed at the end of the rotation of said plug member in the direction to move said feed wheel towards said cutting wheel,

5. The invention of claim 4 in which said clutch means comprises a cam plate secured to said plug for rotation therewith and having a notch on its peripheral edge, a spring pressed lever carried by said handle and normally engaging said notch, and cam means on said body to engage said lever and disengage the lever from the notch of said cam plate as the rotation of said handle is continued in the selected direction after a pre-- determined amount of rotation.

6. The invention of claim 5 in which means is provided to hold said lever out of engagement with said notch and said cam means during the continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction.

'7. A can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatably secured. to said body member, a subassembly plate fastened to said body member, a plug member rotatably and slid-ably mounted in a bore of said body member and nonslidably journalled in a bore of said subassem-bly plate to be rotatably carried thereby, a bore extending through said plug member and eccentrically positioned with respect to the bore of said body member, a 1'0- tatable operating handle having a spindle ex tending through said second bore, a feed wheel secured to said spindle to be rotated with said handle, first gear means connecting said plug member to said cutting wheel during the rotation of said plug torotate said cutting Wheel, clutch means connecting said handle to said plug to rotate said plug during a first portion of the rotation of said handle in. a selected direction whereby the spindle and feed Wheel are moved towards said cutting wheel, means to disconnect said clutch means during continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction, and second gear means connecting said feed wheel and said cutting wheel for rotation therewith after said clutch means is disconnected.

8. A can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatably secured to said body member, a subassembly plate resiliently fastened to said body member for limited separational movement therebetween, a plug member rotatably and slidably mounted in a bore of said body membar and non-slidably journalled in a bore of said suba-ssembly plate to be rotatably carried there by, a bore extending through said plug member and eccentrically positioned with respect to the bore of said body member, a rotatable operating handle having a spindle extending through said second bore, a feed Wheel secured to said spindle to be rotated'with said handle, first gear means connecting said plug member to said cutting wheel during rotation of said plug to rotate "said cutting" wheel, clutch means connecting said handle to said plug to rotate said plug during a first portion of the rotation of said handle in a selected direction whereby the spindle and feed wheel are moved towards said cutting wheel, means to disconnect said clutch means during continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction, and second gear means connecting said feed wheel and said'cutting wheel for rotation therewith after said clutch means is disconnected.

9. A .can opener comprising a body member, a cutting wheel rotatably secured to said body member, a subassembly plate resilientlyfastened to said body member for limited separational movement therebetween, means to adjustably limit the minimum separation between said plate and said body member, a plug member rotatably and slidably mounted in a bore of said body member and non-slidably journalled in a bore of said subassembly plate to be rotatably carried thereby, a bore extending through said plug member and eccentrically positioned with respect to the bore of said body member, a rotatable operating handle having a spindle extending through said second bore, a feed wheel secured to said spindle to be rotated with said handle, first gear means connecting said plug member to said. cutting wheel during the rotation of said plug to rotate said cutting wheel, clutch means connecting said handle to said plug to rotate said plug during a first portion of the rotation of said handle ina selected direction whereby the spindle and feed wheel are moved towards said cutting wheel, means to disconnect said clutch means during continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction, and second gear means connecting said feed wheel and said cutting wheel for rotation therewith after said clutch means is disconnected. 10. The invention of claim 3 in which said clutch means comprises a cam plate secured to said plug for rotation therewith and having. a notch on its peripheral edge, a spring pressed lever carried by said handle and normally. engaging said notch, and cam means on said body to engage said lever and disengage the lever from the notch of said cam plate as the-rotation of said handle is continued in the selected direction after, a predetermined amount of rotation.

11. The invention of claim in which means is provided to hold said lever out of engagement with said notch and said cam means during the continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction.

12. The invention of claim 9 in which said clutch means comprises a cam plate secured to said plug for rotation'therewith and having a notch on its peripheral edge, a spring pressed lever carried by said handle and normally engaging said notch, and cam means to engage said lever and disengage the lever from the notch of said cam plate as the rotation of said handle is continued in the selected direction after a predetermined amount of rotation.

13. The invention of claim 12 in which means is provided to hold said lever out of engagement with said notch and said cam means during the continued rotation of said handle in the selected direction.

14. In a can opener of the type having a cutter wheel and a cooperating feed wheel to engage the can, a frame, a rotary member mounted on said frame for limited rotation in opposite directions about a fixed axis, a driving shaft eccentrically mounted on said rotary member for orbital movement about said fixed axis and for id independent rotarymovement about its own axis, one ofsaid wheels mounted on said frame and the other mounted on said shaft for movement toward and away from said one wheel upon said orbital movement of the shaft, a crank member connected to the shaft for turning same, a positive clutch. for causing said rotary member to turn with said crank member during a predetermined partialrotation of the latter, said clutch including a'dogcarried by one of the members, a notch in the other member for receiving the dog thereby to couple the two members together, a-

spring urging said dog toward the notch, cam means on the frame positioned to engage the dog and move same out of the notch after said predetermined partial rotation of the crank member, whereby continued rotation of the crank member only turns said shaft about its own axis without causing further rotation of said rotary member, and a-barrier shiftable between the dog and the notch when the dog is moved out of the notch, for preventing thedog from moving back into the notch as'it-passes thereover during said continued rotation of the crank member.

15. A can opener as in claim 14 having means for shifting said barrier upon reversal of the direction of rotation of the crank member after said continued rotation, thereby to permit said dog to move'back into said notch.

16. In a can opener of the type having a cutter wheel and a cooperating feed wheel to engage the can, a frame, a rotary member mounted on said frame for limited rotation in opposite directions about a fixed axis, a driving shaft eccentrically mounted on said rotary member for orbital movement about said fixed axis and for independent rotary movement about its own axis, one of said wheels mounted on said frame and the other mounted on said shaft for movement toward and away from said one wheel upon said orbital movement of the shaft, a crank member connected to the shaft for turning. same, a positive clutch for causing 'said' rotary'member .to turn with said crank member during a predetermined partial rotation of the latter, said clutch including a dog carried by one of the members, a notch in the other member for receiving the dog thereby to couple the two members together, a spring urging said dog toward the notch, a silencer disk interposed between said members and rotatable independently of said members about the axis of said shaft, said disk having an aperture through which said dog projects into said notch whereby said disk turns with said members-When they are thus coupled by said clutch, cam means on the frame positioned to engage said dog and lift same out of said notch and aperture after said predetermined partial rotation of the crank member whereby continued rotation of the crank member turns said shaft about its own axis without causing further r0 tation of said rotary member, said disk being effective to halt momentarily when said dog is lifted out of said aperture, and a lost motion connection between said disk and crank member for thereafter causing said disk to resume and continue rotation with the crank member, the loss of motion of said disk due to said momentary halting thereof being suflicient to shift said aperture out of register with said dog whereby the dog cannot drop back into said notch as it passes thereover during said continued rotation of the crank member.

17. In a can opener of the type having a cutter wheel and a cooperating feed wheel, a body plate tarry-log said wheels, a can rest assembly for forcibly urging the rim of a can against the feed wheel during the can opening operation, said assembly comprising a pair of laterally spaced arms extending outwardly from one of said body plate in a direction substantially normal thereto, eaoh of said arms having a portion extend n through a slightly enlarged aperture in the body plate whereby said portion is loose in the aperture, shoulders on the respective arms opposite taces of said plate adjacent said apertures to prevent the outer ends of the arms from moving apart beyond a .;predetermined 'distance but permitting :same to move toward one another, "a spring between said :arms urging the outer ends thereof apart, one of said comprising a can rest adapted to be 'lengaged :by the rim :of a ean and urged thereby itoward the other :arm during the can 'bpening operation.

1-8. A can 'opener as in 13 wherein said shoulders comprise a first pair of shoulders .on the respectiveiarms and a second pair of shoulders on the respective arms, the-shouldersnisaid first pair being 'disposed on said 0116 side or said plate and extending away from one another, and the shoulders of said second :p'air being disposed on the opposite side of the plate and extending toward one another.

19. In a can opener of the having a rotary cutting wheel and a cooperating :Eeed wheel, a main body member, sat-stationary plate fixedly secured to said body member .at two spaced points thereon thereby to Iprevent shifting of plate in its own plane, one of said wheels being rota-tably mounted on the body member and the other being rotatably motmted ion said :plate .inte'rmediate said two .points, and said plate being formed of resilient sheet material thereby to permit limited movement of said other wheel in a direction normal to the plane of :said :plate :due to bowing of the plate between salad two points.

20. In a can openm' "of the type having a motary cutti-ng wheel and a cooperating feed wheel, a main body member, a stationary plate rmember fixedly seouredto the body member at two spaced points thereon,therebytopreventshiiting of said plate member in its own plane, said plate -membe r-being formedrof resilient sheet-material thereby to :permit limited bowing of the plate :member between said two points, one of said wheels being :rotatably mounted on the plate member intermediate said two points with its axis 'generally transverse to the :pla-ne of the :plate, the other wheel being rotatably mountedonsaid body member with its axis aligned in the general direction of solid first axis whereby the axial distance between said wheels varies {in accordance with the bowing of said plate member.

21. A can opener as in claim .20, wherein one of said members contains an aperture and the whel'mounted on the other one of said mem- 1'2 hers is oarried on the free end of a spindle which projects through said aperture from said other member.

22. A can opener as in claim 20, wherein one of said members carries a thrust element bearing against the other member between said two points, said element being adjustable to vary the amount of bowing of said plate member.

23. can opener as in claim 26,, wherein one of said members has intermediate said two a threaded aperture which is received a screw whose axis is normal to the plane of said plate and whose end abuts the other end :of said members, whereby rotation of said screw is effective to vary the amount'of bowing otfzsaid plate member.

24.. A can opener as in claim 23., having means for looking said screw against rotation relative to :saidone member.

25. Ina pan opener of the type haulage-rotary cuttmg wheel and a eooperating feed wheel, a main body member having a fiat race, a subassenibly plate member parallel to and adjacent said face of the :body member. said plate member being secured to the body member at a plurality of spaced points thereby to prevent movement of the plate member in its own plane, spring means at each of said points olarnping said plate and body members together but .yieldable to limfiaed senarat'ional movement between the two, one of said wheels being ootaiably mounted on the .body member and the other being rotatably mounted iamthe plate member to move therewith upon said sepanational movement.

126. n can opener as in claim 25., having a stop carried by one of said :members and normally abutting the other member under the influence of said spring means thereby to limit the minimum separation of the two members, and means for :a'cljusting said step relative to said one memher to wary said minimum separation.

2H. A can opener :as in claim 25, wherein one oifsaidmembers :has a threadedaperture (in which is received a screw whose axis is normal to said face and whose end abuts the other member, whereby rotation of said screw adjusts the min? mum separation between the two members.

28. A can opener as in 'olaim Q'Lhaving means for said sorew against rotation relative to one member.

MLLIAM J.

References -Cited in the tile or patent "UNITED STATES PATENTS Nimiber Name Date -2;1'.48,z180 :Murdock .d Feb. 21, 4&39 .:2,'257.,549 :Froelloh SBptvBQ, 1941 2,522,332. :Inampl new--- Sept. r12 1950 2,592.;935 McLean Apr. 4-5, 1.952

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Classifications
U.S. Classification30/422
International ClassificationB67B7/46, B67B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67B7/36
European ClassificationB67B7/36