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Publication numberUS2647569 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1953
Filing dateMay 24, 1951
Priority dateMay 24, 1951
Publication numberUS 2647569 A, US 2647569A, US-A-2647569, US2647569 A, US2647569A
InventorsFlynn John H
Original AssigneeFlynn John H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ribbon-type gas burner-unit
US 2647569 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNIT lal A. .ZH 12 .V Ww,

J. H. FLYNN RIBBON-TYPE GAS BURNER Filed March 24, 1951 M l m. m Qld/ 2% Aug. 4, 1953 ,0, im m// mv\ n Z Q0 e n I Patented Aug. 4, 1953 John H. Flynn, New Rochelle, N. Y.

. Application Mayv 24, 1951, Serial No. 228,095

1 The` present invention relates, in general, to gas burners and moreparticularly to a ribbontype gas burner, that is to say a gas burner which comprises a slotted hollow casing anda plurality of corrugated metal burner ribbons in the slot of the casing. Fora complete description of the type of ribbons used with earlier types of gas burners, and contemplated for use with the burner-unit of this invention, reference may-be made to applicants Patent No.` 2,499,482, March 7, 1950.

The gas used in this typeof burner is usually a combustible mixture of a hydrocarbon gas and.

air, and when employed under appreciable pressures, as is required for most industrial uses as well `as for some domestic uses, it is necessary to provide two distinct types of gas passages characteristic of the above identified burner ribbons, these two types of gas passages being identied as the high velocity gas ports and low velocity gas ports, the lowvelocity gas ports providing,

in effect, piloting flames for supporting the com 4 bustion of the gas mixture flowing from the high velocity ports. This circumstance is due, in part', to the fiame propagation rate of the gaseous mixture being used, and in this connection it has been found necessary heretofore to construct 'individual ribbon-type burners to meet the flamev propagation rate of a particular gas mixture being used, that is to say, depending upon whether it is a natural gas,l a manufactured gas, or propane.

Moreover, due to this same factor, thel single ribbon-type burner is of limited capacity,.

4 Claims. (Cl. 158-116) A still further object of the invention is to4 provide a ribbon type gas burner-unit of high` capacity wherein each individual groove of the burner-unit may act as an independent self-supporting burner.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a superior ribbon-type gas burner-unit of high capacity, having a grooved casing of rigid homogeneous construction, and 'shaped to control the flow of air thereover, such that the burnerv will operate satisfactorily when installed in an air stream of high velocity.

Other objects and advantages will appear to those skilled iii the art from the following, ccnsidered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the accompanying drawings, in which certain modes of carrying out the present invention are shown for illustrative purposes:

Fig. l is a side elevation partly in section of the improved ribbon-type burner-unit of this inventicn;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the burner-unit of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section of the burnerunit on line 3--3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse section of the burner-unit on line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of one of the burner grooves andl showing the burner ribbons located therein; and

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a plurality of burner-units secured together in longitudinal alignment.`

As pointed out at the outset, ribbon-type burnvers lheretofore used have consisted of a casing 'provided with a single slot in which a single set A further object of the invention is to providey a superior ribbon-type f gas burner-unit having, l'

high velocity and low velocity grooves, each provided with high velocity and low velocity burner ribbons.

`A furtherv object of the invention is to provide a superior ribbon-type gas burner-unit of the type hereinabove described, having improved. means for cleaning outdirt and other foreignv matter which may accumulate. in the burner grooves.

of burner ribbons is mounted, the burner ribbons being adapted to provide self-piloting, that is to say, having as part of their construction high velocity and low velocity burner-ports such as described more fully in the above identified patent, to which a combustible gas mixture is supplied under substantially uniform pressure. While this type of burner has proven successful, the burner-unit of the present invention is designed to have higher capacity as well as greater adaptability to a variety of gas mixtures.

Referring to the drawings, the ribbon-type burner-unit comprises a casing or body l0 formed of cast iron, malleable iron, or the like, the length of the casing exceeding its transverse dimensions. Pursuant to the objects of the invention, the shape of the casing is designed so that the burner-unit will operate successfully, in a relal tivelyhighA velocity airstream, and to this end the casing is made substantially ovate or teardrop in cross section, as shown especially well in Fig. 3, the portion II thereof of maximum diameter having an aperture l2 extending longitudinally therethrough, which aperture is hereinafter referred to as the gas-supply passage of the burner-casing. The portion of the casing of minimum transverse dimensions is identied by the numeral I3 and comprises a substantially flat burner-surface, indicated generally at I4, extending throughout the length of the casing and provided with upstanding flanges I5 ex` tending along opposite sides respectively thereof. and in transversely spaced parallel relationship. The aforesaid flat burner-surface tdi. isV thus a plane below the upper edges of the upstanding anges IE-l of the casing and hence is sometimes hereinafter referred to as the flat: recessed burner-surface of the burner, the upstanding flanges of which serve to protect the; combustible gases or flames of the burner against dilution., deflection and undcrcutting by air currents pass.- ing over the. bur-ner.

Each end of the casing is provided with. an integral substantially disk-shaped ilange t6 having circumferentially spaced apertures I'I therein to accommodate bolts whereby two or more burner-units may be secured together in Substantially axial alignment in the manner shown in Fig` 5 to provide a multi-unit burner of relatively long length. In this regard,y the portion of each. flange opposite they corresponding end of the aforesaid recessed burner surface I4 of the` casing is cut out as indicated at. I8 so that. when. the several burner-units are secured together as hereinabove described and shown, the flat burner-surfaces. of the several units will constitute a single, substantially continuous uninterrupted burner-surface. Further,I when a plurality of burner-.units are thus assembled, the flanges la at. the opposite ends respectively of the multi-unit burner have. axially apertured substantially disk shaped flanges I9 bolted to the outer faces thereof the; axial apertures of the flanges i9 being internally threaded for connecting the multi-unit. burner to a source of gas supply. A portion of each of these apertured end nanges serves also to. close olf the corresponding ends of the single continuous recessed burner-surface of the multi-unit burner.

Returning now more particularly to Figs. 3 and 4, the flat recessed burner-surface Ill of the. burner-unit is provided with a plurality of narrow but relatively deep grooves. 20, 2| and 22 respectively which extend longitudinally thereof and in spaced substantially parallel relationship,l each groove being adapted. to accommodate a set of high velocity and low velocity burner ribbons of' the type described in the above identied patent and indicated generally at 2.3.A In the embodiment of the invention shown herein, three burnerribbon supporting-grooves are shown in the recessed burner-surface of the burner-unit, but it Will be understood that more than three grooves may be used should it be desired to increase the capacity of the burner. A

Each of the longitudinal grooves in the recessed burner-surface of the burner-unit is open at its upper end to the atmosphere. The center groove 2 I, which may be described as a groove coincident with a substantially vertical plane through the longitudinal axis of the burner-unit, is adapted to be connected directly to the gas-supply passage I2 of the burner-unit and supplied with gas therefrom at relatively high velocity. To these ends, the bottom of the center groove intersects the dome of a bell-shaped channel 2li formed in the top of the gas-supply passage I2 and extending longitudinally thereof, the channel 24 being provided with a plurality of transverse webs 25 which are integral with the Walls of the casing and serve to hold the casing from spreading apart transversely of its longitudinal axis. Moreover, the transverse Webs 25 serve also, in effect, to divide the bottom of the center groove 2t into a plurality of longitudinally spaced apertures which serve to deliver the combustible gas-mixture in the supply pipe to the burner ribbon in the center groove. Since. the aforesaid spaced apertures in the bottom of the center groove are relatively large.,r the passage of gas therethrough is relatively unrestricted and hence is delivered to the center groove at a relatively high velocity. The center groove is, therefore, sometimes hereinafter referred to as the high velocity burner groove of the casing..

Ther two outer burner grooves 20. and 22 respectively are not connected directly to the gas-supply passage I2 of the casing but are indirectly connected thereto by a plurality of gas-feeding passages which connect the outer burner grooves to the center or high velocity groove 2 I. Referring especially to Fig. 3, the aforesaid gas-feeding passages ofthe outer burner grooves are. indicated at 26 and are ofA relatively small diameten each extending substantially transversely of the longitudinal axis of the burner and intersecting at its inner end the high velocity burner groove and at its outer end one of the outer burner grooves ofthe casing. For improved performance, the gas-feeding passages slope upwardly and cutwardly at a slight angle relative to the plane of the bottom of the central high velocity groove. Since these gas-feeding passages are of relatively` small diameter, the flow of gas from the center burner groove to each of the outer burner grooves is thus retarded and hence the combustible gas mixture flows into the outer burner grooves at relatively low velocity. In this connection, the outer burner grooves 20 and 22V are sometimes hereinafter referred to as the low velocity burner grooves of the burner-unit.

The aforesaid burner ribbons 23 are of the type illustrated more fully in the above identified patent, and in the preferred form comprise two pai-r of major ribbons, each pair being indicated by the numeral 21, and one pair of minor ribbons indicated generally at 28 and shown especially well in Fig. 5. This arrangement of the major and minor ribbons results in the formation of a plurality of what may be aptly termed low velocity gas ports 29, a plurality of medium orl intermediate velocity gas ports 30, and a plurality of high velocity gas ports SI, the latter extending along the outer edges of the burner, While the low velocity and intermediate velocity gas ports are disposed between the outer high velocity gasI ports. In explanation of the velocity characteristics of the aforesaid gas ports, it may be stated that the small cross sectional area, of each of the low velocity gas ports 2l is commensurate with a relatively large surface area and hence a relatively high skin friction effect. with the result that gas emerging from the gas ports 2I will be slowed down and prevented fromv projecting any appreciable distance from the burner-ribbons. On the other hand, the surface or wall areas of the intermediate gas, ports are somewhat less than those of the 10W vemcity l gasl ports, with the result that. there is less skin.

friction and hence the gas issues therefrom at. greater velocity. In like manner, each of the high velocity gas portsv 3| has a larger crosssectional area as compared to the respective cross-sectional areas of both the gas ports 29 and gas ports 30 and hence less Wall area, with the result that there will be less skin friction, and gas emerging from the gas ports 3| will project a greater distance from the burner rib-v bons.

The burner ribbons illustrated in Fig. 5 will, therefore, produce three different heights of flames, the long flames provided by the high velocity gas ports 3|-3l extending along'the outer edges respectively of the` burner and maintained by the iiames provided by both the low velocity gas ports 29 and intermediate gas ports 30,'While the iiames of the latter are, in turn, sustained by the Allames provided by the low velocity gas ports 29.

The burner ribbons hereinabove described and indicated generally at 253 in Fig. 4, are retained in place in the b urnerfgroovesZ, 2l and 22 respectively of lthe casing in any suitable manner such, for instance, as by transverse pins 32 shown especially well in Figs. l, 2 and 4. In this connection, it will be noted that the ribbons 23 are supported with the upper edges thereof slightly below the burner-surface I4 of the casing, as a consequence of which Ithe vertical Walls of the burner-grooves, in conjunction with upstanding flanges vl'--l of the casing, serve'to shield the llames projecting from the burner ribbons. This is a particularly important aspect of the improved burner of this invention when installed in a high velocity air stream.

Referring again to the restricted passages 25 l l thereof. As an additional feature of the invention, the portion of each of these drilled apertures between its respective low velocity burner groove and the outer surface of the casing is counterbored as indicated at 33, and -provided with a screw-plug 34 to close the counterbored portion of the passage. In accordance with this construction, it is relatively easy to clean out dirt, and other foreign matter from the casing by the relatively simple expedient of unscrewing the plugs 34 along the length of the casing so as to have access to the burner grooves.

As has been mentioned above, each burnerunit constitutes an operable burner in and of itself. However, by providing each unit with integral apertured flanges l6-| 6 at opposite ends respectively thereof, two or more units may be secured together by fastening bolts 35, as shown in Fig. 6, to build up a burner of increased capacity. Moreover, while theinlet to the gas-supply passage l2 of each burner-unit is shown at one end thereof, it will be understood that a gas pipe connection to each unit may be made in lthe bottom of the casing or in one wall thereof, depending upon the circumstances of installation.

It is manifest, therefore, from the foregoing description, that the burner of this invention is characterized by a casing of homogeneous construction and of a tear-drop design, sometimes hereinafter referred to as a casing of ovate cross section, to insure successful performance of the burner when in a high velocity air stream; and that the burner is characterized by the combination of a casing having high velocity burner grooves and low velocity burner grooves, in each of which types of grooves are sets of burner ribbons, each set of burner ribbons incorporating a plurality of high velocity gas ports, low velocity gas ports and intermediate velocity gas ports. This construction has been found to provide a burner-unit of unexpectedly high capacity, due to the fact that the center flame of the high velocity burner groove is sustained and maintained by the names of the low velocity burnerv been found that the improved burner is char acterized by instant lighting and shut-olf, and with little or no residual heat.

TheA invention may be carried out in other specific ways than those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential char-4 acteristics of the invention, and the present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended lclaims are intended to be embraced therein.

I claim:

1. A ribbon-type gas burner, comprising a single-piece cast elongated casing having a longitudinal through-passage of which either end may serve as the gas inlet to said casing, a slot and groove in said casing open to the outside of the latter and extending in laterally spaced parallel relation longitudinally of said casing throughout its length, and a restricted orifice in said casing providing communication between inner portions of said slot and groove, said slot being throughout its length in open communication with said through-passage Iand forming a high-velocity gas outlet, and said groove forming a low-velocity gas outlet; and burner ribbons in the `outer portions of said slot and groove, respectively, said slot and groove being so spaced that the flame from the latter will support the flame from the former.

2. A ribbon-type gas burner, comprising a single-piece cast elongated casing having a longitudinal through-passage of which either end may serve as the gas inlet to said casing, a slot and groove in said casing open to the outside of the latter and extending in laterally spaced parallel relation longitudinally of said casing throughout its length, and a restricted orifice in said casing providing communication between inner portions of said slot and groove, said slot being substantially throughout its length in open communication with said passage and forming a high-velocity gas outlet, and said groove forming a low-velocity gas outlet, and the opposite ends of said casing having integral mounting flanges to permit connection of end-to-end engaged identical casings with their respective gas passages and outlets in alignment and continuous with each other; and burner ribbons in the outer portions of said slot and groove, respectively, said slot and groove being so spaced that the flame from the latter Will support the flame from the former.

3. A ribbon-type gas burner, comprising a singlefpiece east elongated casing having a lonsitudinal cylindrical through-passage of which either end may serve as the gas inlet to said oasng, two outer grooves and a slot formed intsrally in said casing and being open to outside thereof and extending in laterally spaced parF allel relation longitudinally of said casing throughout its length with `Said slot being intel'- rnediate said grooves, restricted orifices providing communication between inner portions of said slot and said grooves, respectively, an internal longitudinal groove between and in open Communication with said passage and said inner s lot portion and extending throughout the length of said casing, and longitudinally substantially equally spaced integrally-formed transverse par" titions substantially wholly within the connes of said internal groove, said slot forming a high` velocity gas outlet and said outer grooves forming low-.velocity gas outlets, and the opposite ends of said casing being plane surfaces extend.- ing transversely of said slot and grooves to Dermit end-to-end engagement of identical casings with their respective gas passages and outlets in alignment and continuous with each other; and burner ribbons in the outer portions of said slot and outer grooves, respectively, said slot and outer grooves being so spaced that the flames from the latter will support the flame from the former.

4, A ribbon-type gas burner, comprising a single-piece cast elongated casing having a 1ongitudinal through-passage of which either end may serveas the gas inlet to said casing, a slot and groove in said casing open to the outside .of the latter and extending in laterally spaced Darallel relation longitudinally of said casingthroughout lits length, and a restricted orifice in said casing providing communication betweeninner portions of said slot and groove, said slot being throughout its length in open communication with said through-passage and forming a high-velocity gas outlet, and said groove forming a 10W-velocity gas outlet, and said casing having means for its end-to-end connection with other identical casings with their respective gas passages and outlets in alignment and continuous with each other; and burner ribbons in the outer portions of said slot and groove, respectively, said slot and groove being so spaced that the llame from the latter will support the flame from the former.

JOHN H. FLYNN.

References Cited in the ille of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 16,574 Risinger Mar. 15, 1927 1,405,214 Hoffman Jan. 31, 1922 1,704,359 Eisler Mar. 5, 1929 2,255,636 Wittmann Sept. 9, 1941 2,288,898 French July '7, 1942 2,428,271 Ensign et al Sept. 30, 1947 2,569,356 Turpin Sept. 25, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1405214 *Apr 2, 1921Jan 31, 1922Hoffman George AGaseous-fuel burner
US1704359 *Jan 10, 1928Mar 5, 1929Eisler CharlesGas burner
US2255636 *Sep 16, 1939Sep 9, 1941Chicago By Products CorpGas burner
US2288898 *May 25, 1939Jul 7, 1942Mark C BatesMethod of singeing cloth and apparatus adapted for use therewith
US2428271 *Oct 28, 1943Sep 30, 1947Ensign Ribbon Burners IncRibbon burner
US2569356 *Sep 4, 1946Sep 25, 1951Hauck Mfg CoGas flame retention elbow burner nozzle
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053316 *Nov 12, 1959Sep 11, 1962Flynn John HGas burner of high-velocity flame sheet type
US3142331 *May 8, 1961Jul 28, 1964Dierks Gustave CModular ribbon-type gas burner
US3301312 *Feb 11, 1965Jan 31, 1967Buns RolfGas burners
US3336915 *Oct 2, 1964Aug 22, 1967Fostoria Fannon IncEnd-to-end connecting structure for infra-red gas burners
US4421478 *Aug 3, 1981Dec 20, 1983Magic Chef, Inc.High efficiency fuel burner
US6116893 *Mar 11, 1998Sep 12, 2000The Aerogen Company LimitedBurner assemblies
DE1218101B *May 15, 1962Jun 2, 1966John Harold FlynnGasbrenner mit einem von einem in Laengsrichtung sich erstreckenden Gehaeuse allseitig umschlossenen Gassammelraum
DE1239796B *Apr 28, 1962May 3, 1967Junkers & CoReihenbrenner fuer gasfoermige Brennstoffe
DE1247531B *Aug 24, 1962Aug 17, 1967John Harold FlynnRohrbrenner fuer gasfoermige Brennstoffe
DE1297802B *Jun 18, 1965Jun 19, 1969WemacGasbrenner
EP0130742A2 *Jun 21, 1984Jan 9, 1985Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.High load gas combustion apparatus
WO1998040667A1 *Mar 11, 1998Sep 17, 1998Aerogen Co LtdBurner assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/349
International ClassificationF23D14/58, F23D14/48
Cooperative ClassificationF23D14/586
European ClassificationF23D14/58F1