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Publication numberUS2648146 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1953
Filing dateApr 13, 1951
Priority dateApr 13, 1951
Publication numberUS 2648146 A, US 2648146A, US-A-2648146, US2648146 A, US2648146A
InventorsFoster Edwin E
Original AssigneeMajik Ironers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jointed supporting arms for flatirons
US 2648146 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1953 FOSTER 2,648,146

JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Edna 77 E/ BJZer Aug. 11, 1953 FOSTER 2,648,146

JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 15, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Edwin [Safe/- Aug. 11, 1953 FOSTER 2,648,146

JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheet s-Sheet 3 Av, l 1 A zmmm 66 MP (39 Inventor.

gcZw/n 15. sfek Aug. 11, 1953 E. E. FOSTER 2,643,146 JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. j waa l d k ATTOFIVE).

Aug. 11, 1953 E. E. FOSTER JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 i li I Y//////////////////////// m 7. v )l/ll/l/fl/l/ll/l/t .i h l A .e W 1 4 5 0 1 Aug. 11, 1953 FOSTER 2,648,146

JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRQNS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 11, 1953 E. E. FOSTER 2,648,146

JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Filed April 13, 1951 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTOR. 2'80 ATTORNEY f atented Aug. 11,, 195 3 JOINTED SUPPORTING ARMS FOR FLATIRONS Edwin E. Foster, Austin, Tex., assignor to Majik- Ironers, Inc., Austin, Tex., a corporation of Texas Application April 13, 1951', Serial No.- 220,956

18 Claims.

This invention relates to supporting devices for irons and more particularly to a linkage to support a fiatir'on or the like for movement in a horizontal plane over an ironing board.

In ironing devices of the type disclosed generally in my Patents Nos. 2,369,732 and 1,985,891 and in my cope'nding applications Serial Nos. 25,137 filed May 5, 1948, and 195,860,.filed November 15, 1950, now Patent No. 2,555,639, issued June 5, 1951, it is, necessary to provide a supporting mechanism. which will provide a point of support movable in a horizontal plane parallel to and above the ironing board. This mechanism is preferably in the form of a linkage which can be relatively light and which will provide maximum freedom of movement for the iron. The linkage also preferably folds vertically that is, about horizontal pivots, so that it will require a minimum of space and maximum strength.

It is accordingly one of the objects of the present invention to provide an iron supporting device in the form of a pivoted linkage which will produce a movement of the free end of the linkage in a horizontal plane.

Another object is to provide an iron supporting linkage which is light and compact, which is relatively simple in construction and which provides an accurately guided movement.

According to one feature of the invention the linkage includes two pivotally connected arms which are further connected by a tension element passing over cam members on the arms respectively to guide the arms for the desired movement.

In order to produce the necessary movement of the arms to keep the free end of the linkage in the desired plane, I have found that certain proportions must exist between the relative lengths of the arms and the relative radii of the cam members. It is, therefore, another object of the invention to provide an iron supporting linkage in which the proper relationship exists between the arms and cam members.

A further object is to provide an iron supportingv device in which lateral movement of the iron is limited to prevent the iron from moving off of the board to an excessive distance.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure I is atop plan view of an ironing board assembly embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a.- side elevation of the assembly;

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the iron supporting linkage;

Figure 4 is an enlarged section of a portion of the supporting linkage;

Figure 5 is a partial section at a right angle to Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a top plan View of the base bracket;

Figure 7 is an explanatory diagram;

Figures" 8 and 8a taken together show a section of an alternative linkage construction;

Figure 9' is a partial section at a right angle to Figure 8;

Figure 10 is a plan view of the'base of Figure 8;

Figure 11 is a sectional view of the elbow structure of Figure 8a;

Figure 12 is a section of another linkage construction; and

Figures 13 and 14 are enlarged partial sections on the lines l3-l3 and l4l4 respectively of Figure 12.

A complete ironing assembly of the type to which the present invention generally relates is shown in Figures 1 and. 2. The assembly includes an ironing board 39 of any desired construction supported on legs at a convenient working height. A mounting bracket 38 is secured in a convenient position and as shown is rigidly bolted directly to the rear end of the ironing board itself tocarry a supporting linkage for an iron 85. As shown the linkage comprises a first arm 51 pivoted to a supporting housing 43 which is mounted for rotation about a vertical axis in the bracket 38* and a forearm 68 pivoted to the arm 51. The iron is mounted at the free end of the arm 68 by a linkage of the type more particularly disclosed in my application, Serial No. 25,137 or my Patent No. 2,555,639, to be held in an elevated position above the board or to be moved into an ironing position on the board.

As shown in Figures 4 and 5, the bracket 38 carries a vertical sleeve 40 into which a shaft 4| can easily be' inserted. The shaft 41 is rotatably mounted in a bearing sleeve 42 which is secured to the housing 43 as by rivets 44. A rivet 45 limits upward movement of the shaft in the housing and a snap ring 46 and washer 4'! limit its downward movement. The weight of the housing and linkage is carried between the bearing sleeve 42 and the top of the sleeve 40. Preferably a heat resistant fiber bumper 48 is secured to the housing 43 to prevent damage to the housing or the iron when the iron swings against the housing.

The arm 5! extends into the housing 43 through an opening in the top of the housing and is mounted for pivoted movement about a horizontal bolt 49 rigidly secured in the housing. A hearing sleeve is clamped in the housing by the bolt 49- and rotatably supports a bearing 52 which is pressed into a hub 53. A plate 54 carried by the hub 53 carries a rod extending into and rigidly secured to the arm 51 and extends downward into the housing to terminate in a pin 55. The upper end of a spring 56 is secured to the pin 55 through a clevis 51 and eye bolt 58, the lower end of the spring being anchored to a pin 59 in the bottom of the housing. The spring 56 counterweights the linkage so that it will tend to remain where it is placed or will even tend to move to an upright position but does not counterweight the iron, no counterweighting of the iron being necessary since it moves in a horizontal plane.

To limit lateral movement of the iron, the plate 54 has an extension carrying a pin 60 pivoted to one end of a double link 61. The other end of link 6| is pivoted to the upper end of a lever 52 by a pin 63. The central part of the lever 62 is pivoted to the housing through a pin 64 and at its lower end the lever carries a roller 65 which is rotatable on a shaft 66. The roller extends through an irregularly shaped opening 61 (Figure 6) in the top of the bracket 38 which serves as a stop to limit lateral movement of the iron.

When the iron is moved to its maximum extended position toward the front of the board as shown at 69 in Figure 1, the roller will be in the dotted position 10 in Figure 6 to prevent further forward or lateral movement of the iron. As the iron is moved back to the position H the roller will move to 12 in the opening 61 and when the iron is moved to its extreme rearward position at 13 the roller will move to 14. Thus the roller and opening define the limits of horizontal movement of the iron without interfering with free movement within the limited area.

In order to maintain the free end of the arm 68 where it connects to the iron supporting linkage 95 at the same distance above the board in all positions of the iron, the arms 5| and 68 are connected by a guiding linkage. As shown, this linkage comprises a tension link 15 connected at one end to the housing 43 by a pin 16. The end of the tension link is made flexible as by connecting thereto a short length of chain 19 to flex around a cam member 80 secured in the housing 43 by pins 11 and I8. The cam member 80 may be centered in the housing by spacers 8| fitting over the pins I1 and 18 which may be swedged or peened over as indicated at 82.

The forearm 68 carries, at the elbow joint, a cam disc 83 whose periphery forms a track for a flexible chain 84 connected to the other end of the tension link 15. The arm 51 carries a pair of side discs l2l carried by an adaptor plug I22 and between which the disc 83 fits and the several discs are pivoted together by means of a bearing I having a hub I 19 on which the disc 83 is journaled. When the linkage is swung down and out from the position shown in Figure 3 the chain 16 will wrap around the cam member 80 to pull on the tension link 15 and swing the arm 68 about the elbow joint. By properly proportioning the radii of cam members 80 and 83 the linkage may be controlled to maintain the free end of arm 68 accurately in a plane parallel to the top surface of the ironing board.

The necessary relationship between the lengths of the arms and the radii of the cam surfaces will be clearer by reference to the diagram, Figure '7. As there shown the upper arm A is pivoted on a horizontal axis to a shoulder joint 5 and is pivoted at an elbow joint E to a forearm B. A fixed cam C1 at the shoulder joint is secured to one end of a tension member or cable C which passes over the cam C1, and over a cam C2 secured to the forearm B. The effective radius of cam C1 from the shoulder joint 5 to the point of tangency of the cable C is indicated as R1 and the effective radius of the cam C2 is indicated as R2. It is assumed that the free end of arm B is to be maintained in a plane at a distance D from the plane of the shoulder joint 5.

If both arms A and B are vertical it will be apparent that D=A-B. As the arm A is swung out through the angle at, to satisfy the requirements:

D=A cos .r-B cos y A cos m-B cos yA+B=0 As the arm A swings through angle at the point of tangency of the cable C on cam C1 will move through the same angle and the point of tangency of the cable on cam C2 will move through the angle m-l-y. Actual length of travel of the points of tangency will be R13: and R2 (x-l-y). Since these must be equal:

Substituting the value for 3 derived from the first equations above:

5 :1 -1 l 1 R2 +1: cos F This equation is correct for any relative lengths of the arms A and B whichever is larger. When B is larger than A, the arm A can theoretically be revolved through a complete 360 although this is hardly practical. When A is larger than B the maximum value for m is reached when A and B lie in a straight line so that the greater the ratio of A to B the smaller the maximum value form. For example, when A/B equals 130 the limiting value for a: is 10 while when A/B equals 1 0 the limiting value is 37. Although no precise limits can be set, the practical ratios probably lie in the range A/B=.3 to A/B=3.

Investigation of various ratios establishe that when A and B are equal, as in the construction shown in Figures 1 to 6, the ratio Rl/RZ is con stant at 2 for all values of 1:. Therefore, in this construction the cam members may have true arcuate surfaces curving about the shoulder and elbow pivots respectively and the radius of cam member may be twice the radius of cam member 84. When the linkage is so constructed the free end of arm 68 will always lie in the horizontal plane of the shoulder pivot 49.

When A and B are unequal the ratio Rl/R2 changes as the angle 2: changes so that for theoretically perfect operation the cam surfaces should be spirals. However, for most practical constructions the error introduced by using arcuate cam surfaces is so small that it can be disregarded. For example, when A/B=2 the total error is about 8% over the range of a: from 10 to 80, In practice a linkage of this ratio is actually used through only about half of that range so that the error is reduced to about 4%. When A/B=10 the total error rises to 12% over a range from 10 to 30, the limit in this case being 37. The actual maximum error in the wei ht of the free end of arm 68 relative to its length can be shown to be /2%. which means that for an arm 68 twenty inches long the variation in height is not over .10 inch. This is probably less than the errors due to elastic distortion, slack due to manufacturing tolerances and the like so that for ratios .of 11/3 at least up to arcuate cams can be used very satisfactorily.

Assuming that arcuate cams are to be used the equation set out above can be simplified by substituting 10 for :c. This makes the equation:

This equation can be used for linkages within practical manufacturing and use limits for arcuate cams with a, maximum error of the magnitude indicated.

Figures 8 to 11 illustrate an alternative linkage construction including a supporting bracket I23 secured to a support such as an ironing board by bolts I24. The bracket carries a sleeve I26 formed at one side with a keyway I25. The sleeve receives a spindle I21 on which a tubular post I28 is rotatably mounted. The post I28 pivotally carries the upper arm I29 of the linkage on a horizontal pivot I30. To mount the post on the spindle lubricated bushings I3I are carried by a sleeve I32 to fit rotatably over the spindle. The sleeve I32 is secured in the post I28 by screws I33 and I34. The screw I 33 may also secure a bumper block I35 to the post while the screw I34 extends into a groove in the spindle I21 to hold the spindle in the post. A washer I3! is preferably mounted between the lower ends of the post I28 and the sleeve I32 and the upper ends of the post I28 and the sleeve I32 and the upper end of the sleeve I26 to carry the weight of the post and linkage assembly. A sleeve I 38 is secured to the lower end of the spindle to hold the washer in place by a pin I39 which also extends into the keyway I325 to hold the spindle against rotation in the sleeve I26. With this construction the post and linkage can pivot about the spindle I21 and the entire assembly can be lifted from the base when not in use.

To limit turning of the postv on the spindle, the arm I29 is connected through a link I40 to a sleeve I4I which moves vertically in the post I28 as the arm I29 is swung. The sleeve I M is formed with an axially extending cam notch as best seen in Figure 9 into which a pin I42 on the spindle I21 extends. The notch is so shaped as to engage the pin I42 and limit lateral movement of the iron in the desired manner similar to the opening 61 and. roller 65 of Figures 1 to 6, the sleeve I 4I being raised and lowered as the iron is moved from end to end of the board to vary the limits of lateral movement as required.

The weight of the linkage is counterbalanced by a tension spring I43 which is fastened at its upper end to the arm I29 at I44. The lower end of the spring is anchored to a cam member I45 which is fixed in the upper end of the post I28 at a point I26 through a clevis I21.

To guide the linkage, a cable I46 is secured at one end to the cam member I45 as by soldering or welding and is arranged to flex over the edge of the cam member which may be grooved for this purpose as shown. The cam member may fit over a sleeve I41 on the pin I30 and is secured in the housing I28 by an extension I48 thereon which is screwed to the housing end wall. The sleeve I41 also serves as a pivot bearing for the arm I29, there being a pair of sleeve bearings I49 6 and 150 pressed into the arm I29 and fitting rotatably over the sleeve I41 for this purpose.

At its upper end the arm I23 is provided with circular shaped spaced sidewalls between which a spacer sleeve I52 is clamped by means of a bolt or rivet I53. A bearing I54 is rotatable on the sleeve I52 and pivotally supports a forearm I55. A cam member I56 shown as a circular pulley is centered between the sides of the forearm by spacer blocks I51 and the forearm, spacer blocks and cam member are rigidly secured together by rivets I58. The spacer blocks are cut away to leave room for an electric cord I59 which preferably passes at one side of the cam member as shown in Figure 11. The cable I46 passes over the cam member I56 and is connected to a pin I60 in the forearm I55 through a turnbuckle or like adjusting device through which the effective cable length can be adjusted.

In this construction as in Figures 1 to 6, the arms I29 and I55 are the same length so that the cam members may have arcuate surfaces with the radius of cam member I45 being twice that of cam member I56.

Figures 12 to 14 show an alternative construction in which the arms are of different lengths. In this construction the linkage is supported by a pin I6I which is rotatably journaled in a vertical supporting sleeve I62. The pin rigidly carries a cam member I63 at its upper end. A hollow upper arm I 64 is formed with an enlarged hollow lower end to enclose the cam member and which rigidly carries a pivot pin I65 which is journaled in an enlarged hub I66 on the cam member.

The cam member has an arcuately curved periphery grooved to receive a guide cable I61 which is anchored at its lower end to the cam member by a screw I68. The cam member also carries a pin I69 to which the lower end of a counterbalance spring I10 is attached, the upper end of the spring being secured to a pin I1I in the arm I64. The arm I64 may also carry a bumper I12 in a position to be engaged by an iron I13 when the linkage is upright as shown.

At its upper end the arm I64 is split and shaped into a pair of circular cupped sections I14 between which the upper end of a forearm I15 is pivoted. At its upper end the forearm has a flattened circular end portion I16 fitting between the sections I14 and secured to a bearing sleeve I11 which is rotatable on a pin or rivet I18 joining the sections I14 at their centers. Preferably the centers of section I14 are pressed in as shown and one side of the end portion I16 is depressed as shown at I19 to provide space for an electric cord I leading to the iron. At its free end the arm I15 carries a joint member I8I for supporting a linkage I82 on which the iron is mounted for movement toward and away from an ironing board.

To guide the forearm, the cable I61 passes over a cam disc I83 secured to the end portion I16 of the forearm and is anchored to the forearm. A plate I84 may overlie the disc I'83 to hold the cable on it.

In this construction as shown, the forearm I15 is one half the length of the upper arm I64. In order to guide the arms properly the cam disc I83 has its surface shaped on a decreasing spiral from its left to its right end and the cam I63 is shaped on an increasing spiral from its lower end to approximately its center and then on a decreasing spiral to its upper right end. The shapes and respective radii of the cams are cal- 7 culated according to first formula derived above to guide the jo'int'member l8| accurately in a horizontal plane in all positions of the linkage. For slightly less accurate results circular cams could be used with the radius of the cam I63 being 2.4 times the radius of cam I83 as determined under the last formula set forth above.

According to another feature of the invention, which is common to all of the embodiments shown herein, the iron can easily be raised to any desired elevation with a minimum of interference from the supporting linkage. Since the linkage is guided by a flexible tension link or a flexible cable, raising of the iron above the level at which it is normally supported by the linkage will merely cause the tension link or cable to become slack. Thus the user can lift the iron to any desired elevation at any time without interference and with only the added burden of raising the weight of the linkage. This facilitates use of the iron in many types of operations and increases the flexibility of the device.

This application is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 669,318 filed May 13, 1946, now abandoned.

While several specific linkages embodying the invention have been shown and described in detail it will be understood that these are illustrative only and are not to be taken as a definition of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a first cam member fixed to the support adjacent to the pivot for the first arm thereon and having a curved outer surface, a second cam member fixed to the second arm adjacent to its pivotal connection to the first arm and having a curved outer surface, and a tension element passing over and engaging the curved outer surfaces of the cam members and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm for movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots.

2. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a cam member fixed to the support and having an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the support and the first arm, a second cam member fixed to the second arm and having an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the arms, and a tension element passing over and engaging the arcuate cam surfaces and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm fOr movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots.

3. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a first cam member fixed to the support adjacent to the pivot for the first arm thereon and having a curved outer surface, a second cam member fixed to the second arm adjacent to its pivotal connection to the first arm and having a curved outer surface, and a tension element passing over and engaging the curved outer surfaces of the cam members and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm for movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots, the effective radii of the cam members bein determined according to the formula R1 and R2 are the effective radii of the first and second cam members respectively, A and B are the lengths of the first and second arms respectively and a; is the angle of the first arm to vertical.

4. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a cam member fixed to the support and having an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the support and the first arm, a second cam member fixed to the second arm and having an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the arms, and a tension element passing over and engaging the arcuate cam surfaces and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm for movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots, the radii of the cams being determined according to the formula:

%;=.1 cos' (1.015% 1 where R1 and R2 are the radii of the first and second cam members respectively and A and B are the lengths of the first and second arms respectively.

5. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a cam member fixed to the support andhaving an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the support and the first arm, a second cam member fixed to the second arm and having an arcuate cam surface concentric with the axis of the pivot between the arms, and a tension element passing over and engaging the arcuate cam surfaces and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm for movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots, the arms being of equal length and the radius of the first cam member being twice the radius of the second cam member.

6. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a'first cam member fixed to the support adjacent to the pivot for the first arm thereon and having a curved outer surface, a second cam member fixed to the second arm adjacent to its pivotal connection to the first arm and having a curved outer surface, and a tension element passing over and engaging the curved outer surfaces of the cam members and secured at its ends in the support and the second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cams to guide the free end of the second arm for movement in a horizontal plane as the arms are swung about their pivots, the arms being of different lengths and at least one of the cam members having a spiral cam surface and the second cam member being smaller than the first cam member.

7. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a single tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two single sections of substantially equal length hinged to "each other and one end pivotally mounted on the tubular housing, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arm sections swing vertically,

and a cam surface secured in the iron holding arm at its hinge, a cam surface of substantially twice the radius of the first cam surface secured in the tubular housing at its pivot with the arm section and a tension member wrapping around said cam surfaces and extending in and attached to its ends to the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane.

8. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two substantially equal length sections hinged to each other and pivotally mounted on the tubular housing at one end, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arm sections swing vertically, means in the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, said means including a pulley at the hinge of the two sections and a second pulley at the pivot of the tubular housing and arm, and a cable extending over each pulley and secured to one arm section at one end and to one of the pulleys at the other end, said first named pulley having a radius which is one-half of the radius of the second pulley.

9. A supportin device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and pivotally mounted on the tubular housing at one end, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arms swing vertically, a cam surface secured in the iron holding arm at its hinge, a cam surface secured in the tubular housing at its pivot with the arm section and a tension member wrapping around said cam surfaces and secured at its ends in the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move horizontally in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, and a spring for said arm secured in the tubular housin at one end and at the other in the arm to counterbalance the weight of the arm.

10. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and one end pivotally mounted on the tubular housing, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arms swing vertically, and a cam surface secured in the iron holding arm at its hinge, a cam surface secured in the tubular housing at its pivot with the arm section and a tension member wrapping around said cam surfaces and secured at its ends in the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, said arm being tubular in form and accommodating an electric cord extending into the arm near the housing and leaving the arm near the iron.

11. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to the ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and one end pivotally mounted on the tubular housing, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arms swing vertically, means in the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted must move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, said means including a curved cam surface at the hinge of the two sections and .a second curved cam surface at the pivot of the tubular housing and arm, and a flexible tension member extending over each curved cam surface and secured at its opposite ends against longitudinal movement relative to the cam surfaces.

12. An ironing device comprising an iron, a jointed arm on which the iron is supported from one end thereof, said arm being in the form of two substantially equal length sections hinged to each other at one end of each section With the other end of one of the sections having the iron secured thereto, means for supporting the other end of the other section, a cam surface at the hinge of the two sections movable with the section which supports the iron, a cam surface adjacent to the said other end of the said other section and secured to said support, and flexible means connected at one end to one arm section and at the other end to the support extending over the cam surfaces, the cam at the joint between the arm sections having substantially onehalf the radius of the cam at the joint between the arm and the support, whereby the iron will always be maintained in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved in a vertical plane.

13. In a supporting arm having two parts of substantially equal lengths hinged together to fold toward and away from one another in a vertical plane with the hinge at the upper ends of the arms, a support to which the lower end of one of said arms is hinged, an arcuate segment fixed to the support with its center substantially on the axis of the support hinge, a second arcuate segment fixed to the free arm with its center substantially on the axis of the hinge between the arm members, the radius of the second segment being substantially one-half of the radius of the first segment, a tension member lying around each of the segments and extending between them whereby the lower end of the other arm will move in a horizontal plane upon relative movement of the two arms.

14. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, a vertical bearing for the tubular housing, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and one end pivotally mounted on the tubular housing, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arm sections swing vertically, means secured to the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, including a cam and cam follower, one secured to the vertical bearing and the other secured to the tubular housing to limit the movement of the iron when the iron is swung beyond the edges of the ironing board.

15. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, a vertical bearing for the tubular housing, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and one end pivotally mounted on the tubular housing, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arm sections swing vertically, means in the arm and tubular housing, so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, and cooperating cam and cam follower, one secured to the vertical bearing and the other secured in the tubular housing to limit the movement of the iron when the iron is swung beyond the edges of the ironing board.

16. A supporting device for an iron on an ironing board comprising a tubular housing adapted to be secured adjacent to an ironing board in a vertical direction, an arm in two sections hinged to each other and pivotally mounted on the tubular housing at one end, means for mounting the iron on the other end of the arm, said pivots being horizontal so that the arm sections swing vertically, means in the arm and tubular housing so that the end of the arm on which the iron is mounted will move in a horizontal plane when the arm sections are moved vertically in order to maintain the iron in a horizontal plane, a sleeve member having a V-shaped slot therein to variably limit the turning movement of the arm in dependence upon the elevated position of the hinged portion of the arm, a stationary stop member fitting into the V-shaped slot, and a connection between the arm and the sleeve to move the sleeve vertically in response to the pivotal movement of the articulated arm.

17. An ironing device comprising, an ironing board, a jointed arm, means on one end of the arm to support an iron to move above and slightly beyond the edge of the ironing board, a base member secured to the ironing board, a tubular pedestal vertically mounted on the base member to rotate horizontally thereon and having means to pivotally support the other end of the arm, means in said jointed arm to counterbalance the weight of the iron and arm to guide the iron for horizontal movement parallel to the board, and a cam member and follower cooperating with each other and one of which is secured to the base member and the other to the arm to limit the movement of the iron beyond the edge of the ironing board.

18. A supporting device for an iron comprising a support fixed against vertical movement, a first arm pivoted on the support on a horizontal axis, a second arm pivoted to the free end of the first arm on a horizontal axis, a first cam member fixed to the support adjacent to the pivot for the first arm thereon, a second cam member fixed to the second arm adjacent to its pivotal connection to the first arm, and a flexible tension member passing over the cam members and secured at its ends in the support and second arm against longitudinal movement relative to the cam members to limit downward movement of the free end of the second arm while allowing free upward movement thereof.

EDWIN E. FOSTER.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3284933 *Feb 10, 1964Nov 15, 1966Majik Ironers IncIron lifter
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Classifications
U.S. Classification38/30, 248/117.1, 248/284.1, 248/584
International ClassificationD06F77/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F77/00
European ClassificationD06F77/00