Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2648325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1953
Filing dateJun 11, 1952
Priority dateJun 11, 1952
Publication numberUS 2648325 A, US 2648325A, US-A-2648325, US2648325 A, US2648325A
InventorsSiple Paul A
Original AssigneeSiple Paul A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Body warmer
US 2648325 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. A. SIFLE Aug. 11, 1953 BODY WARMER 4 SheetsSheet 1 Filed June 11, 1952 PAUL A. Sum 6m ATTORNEY Aug. 11, 1953 Filed June 11, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR PAUL A SIPL.E.

ATTORNEY P. A. SIPLE BODY WARMER Aug. 11, 1953 4 Sheet-8 511991. 3

Filed June 11, 1952 l N VENTOR PAUL A, SIPLE I ATTORNEY P. A. SIPLE BODY WARMER.

Aug. 11, 1953 Filed June 11, 1952 INVENTOR" PAUL ASmu:

|ll I ll IIP ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 11, 1953 pairs 8 Claims.

(Granted under Title 35, U. S. Code (1952),

sec. 266) The invention described herein, if patented, may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

My invention relates to a body-Warming device.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a jacket for imparting heat to the body of the wearer and including self-contained means for generating heat.

A further object is to provide a body-warming jacket having a heated liquid circulating system arranged next to the body so that heat from liquid is transferred by conduction and radiation to the body.

A further object is to provide a body-warming garment having a warm liquid circulating system, and means actuated by breathing for causing the liquid to circulate through the system.

A further object is to provide a body-warming jacket which is equipped with one or more liquid heating reservoirs which surround chemical or other self contained heating units, so that the liquid in the reservoirs is heated before it is circulated about the body.

A further object is to provide a body-warming garment so constructed that a large area of the body may be effectively warmed.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a device of the above-mentioned character which is simplified in construction, lightweight and inexpensive t manufacture.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, and in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same,

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a body-warming jacket embodying my invention, part in section,

Figure 2 is a rear elevation of the jacket, part broken away,

Figure 3 is an enlarged horizontal section taken on line 3-43 of Figure 1,

Figure 4 is an enlarged longitudinal vertical section taken on line li of Figure 1, parts broken away,

Figure 5 is a side elevation of the jacket,

Figure 6 is a plan view of the jacket in a flat extended position,

Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view through a tube of the device, and showing a removable filling cap mounted thereon, and,

Figure 8 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section through a heat exchange tube of the jacket and showing a one-way check valve mounted within the tube.

In the drawings, where for the purpose of illustration is shown a preferred embodiment of my invention, the numeral I ii designates generally a flexible fabric sheet or blank which forms the body portion of the jacket. The sheet iii is preferably formed of canvas duck, or some similar material which is stretch resistant. The sheet id is generally rectangular as shown in Figure 6, and adapted t be folded transversely near its longitudinal center to form a front H and back l2 of the jacket. The jacket front I! is split longitudinally at I3, to form a front button or snap closure it as shown in Figure 1. A. neckreceiving opening 55 is formed centrally in the sheet it, and the opposite longitudinal edges of the sheet are tailored at I l; to form arm-receiving openings.

To aid in adjusting the jacket is to fit various individuals, the sheet it is further provided near its opposite longitudinal edges with rows of longitudinally spaced lacing eyelets ill, the rows extending from the bottoms of the arm openings to the lower end of the jacket, Figure 1. Suitable lacing i3 is provided for coaction with the eyelets il to draw the jacket tightly about the body of the wearer similar to a corset, for a purpose to be described.

Heat transfer means for the jacket are provided, which comprise a plurality of generally vertical flexible tubes 5 9 of rubber or the like, arranged next to the inner side of the jacket, and extend from the top of the jacket to the lower end thereof. An upper flexible header or rubber tube 2 is arranged upon the inner side of the jack t and extends about the rear of the neck opening 15, and includes side branches 2! which lie beneath the shoulders of the jacket, Figure 1. The outer end 22 of one side branch M is permanently closed, while the outer end of the other branch 2i carries a removable screw-threaded liquid-tight plug 22', Figure '7. The upper ends of the tubes [9 are permanently connected in the header 29, in any preferred manner.

A lower flexible header section or rubber tube 23 is disposed upon the inner side of the back l2 and extends along the lower edge thereof and has its ends 24 permanently closed. Lower flexible header sections 25 and 26 likewise extend adjacent to the lower edge of the jacket front H at the inner side of the same, and have their ends 25' permanently closed. The lower ends of the tubes it next to the back 52 are permanently connected in the lower header section 23,

and the lower ends of the tubes [9 adjacent to the jacket front H are permanently connected in the header sections 25 and 26 in a preferred manner to form liquid-tight joints.

The several heat transfer tubes 19 are formed at longitudinally spaced intervals to provide enlarged compressible bulbs 21, integral therewith, and each tube i9 preferably has about 6 of the elastic bulbs 27, although the number may be varied as desired. The bulbs 21 of adjacent tubes l9 are staggered vertically, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, so that the several rows of bulbs interfit, and a maximum number of the bulbs may be employed for covering a maximum area of the body.

The headers 29, 23, 25 and 25 are secured to the inner side of the jacket in any preferred manner, such as by heat resistant waterproof cement, or by tapes, or the like, not shown. The headers lie against the inner face of the jacket, as shown. The enlarged bulbs 21 contact the inner face of the jacket, and are secured thereto at 28 by suitable cement or the like, Figure 4. The bulbs 2i maintain the vertical tubes l9 spaced slightly from the inner surface of the jacket, as shown. The tubes [9 may also be connected with the jacket ll! by means or tapes or cords, not shown, if desired.

The bulbs 21 may directly contact the body of the wearer, but in some instances the heat produced by the chemical or catalytic heaters may be too intense for comfort. To offset this, small pads of sponge rubber, fabric, felt or the like, not shown, may be cemented to the inner sides of the bulbs 21, and these pads may contact the body and insulate the same somewhat against the direct effect of the heat from the bulbs.

Near the lower ends of the heating tubes l9, and below the lowermost bulbs 27, all of the tubes are provided with one-way check valves 3 Figure 8, which permit the liquid within the tubes l9 to flow downwardly therein, but prevent the liquid from flowing upwardly from the lower ends of the tubes H3. The valves 38 are preferably membrane flutter valves as shown in Figure 8.

A plurality of flexible liquid-heating reservoirs or bags 3| of rubber or the like are arranged upon the outer side of the jacket l0, and preferably a pair of the reservoirs 3| is arranged at the front and back of the jacket. The reservoirs 3| are somewhat elongated vertically, and relatively fiat, so that they will tend to lie against the body. Rubber tubes 32 and 33 lead from the top and bottoms of the bags 3!, for connection in the headers 2|, 23, 25 and 26.

Each bag or reservoir 3| has an internal dry pocket 33 having an upper opening 34 for receiving a self-contained heater 35 of a preferred conventional type.

The heater 35 may be a catalytic heater, or a chemical heater of the type embodying a jacket or container for a chemical composition which generates heat in the presence of water, as a reactant. For example, I may use chemical heaters of the type shown in Patents 2,429,973; 1,760,- 102; 1,558,248 or 1,602,456. The heaters 35 are self-contained units, which are bodily removable through the openings 35 when they become exhausted. Where catalytic heaters are used, the openings 3 3 also serve to admit air, necessary for the operation of the heaters.

Since the bags 3| and their tubes 32 and 33 are disposed upon the outer side of the jacket, suitable penings 3B are formed in the sheet ill for receiving the tubes 32 and 33, where the same are connected with the headers 28, 23, 25 and 26. The arrangement is such that the heaters 35, when arranged in the pockets 33, are substantially com-' pletely surrounded by the liquid within the bags EI, and the heat given off by the chemical heaters is transferred to the liquid in the reservoirs by conduction. It should be mentioned here that walls of the bags 3|, tubes i9, bulbs 21 and the several headers 20, 23, 25 and 26 are quite thin so that heat can readily pass through the same by conduction. If desired, the outer walls 31 of the bags 3% may be made somewhat thicker than the inner walls 38 next to the heaters 35, so that heat lost by conduction from the outer sides of the bags 3| is reduced. The inner walls 38 being thinner will more efficiently conduct heat from the heaters 35 to the liquid within the bags 3|.

Each reservoir or bag 3| preferably has a slightly enlarged bulb portion 36 near its lower end and below the heater 35, which may be compressed manually to pump the liquid through the system with more speed than it would normally have due to breathing action by the wearer, and natural convectional circulation.

In use, the system including the tubes l9, headers 2B, 23, 25, 25 and bags 3| is filled or substantially filled with water or some other suitable liquid, by removing the plug 22, and when the plug is securely replaced, the jacket may be donned. The lacing E8 is tightened so that the jacket is bound fairly tightly about the body and the bulbs 27 are slightly compressed between the body and fabric sheet ii).

When the heaters 35 are adjusted to give off heat, such heat is conducted through the inner walls 38 of the bags 3| to the liquid Within the reservoirs 3|. When the wearer of the jacket breathes normally, the bulbs 2'| are continuously compressed and expanded, and this creates a pumping action which causes the liquid in the reservoirs 3| to circulate upwardly through the tubes 32 and into the upper header 2d. The water then circulates downwardly through the tubes I9 and through the check valves 30 to the lower headers 23, 25 and 26, which in turn convey the liquid back to the lower ends of the bags 3|, by way of the tubes 33. If it is desired to speed up the flow of liquid in the system, one or more of the bulb portions 36 may be alternately compressed and released, and this pumping action increases the velocity of the liquid through the system. Circulation in the system is also aided by convection, the warm liquid tending to rise from the bags 3|, through the tubes 32. In this manner, the heated liquid flows continuously next to the body of the wearer and heat is transferred by conduction and radiation to the body. The check valves 38 prevent the liquid from circulating in the opposite direction through the system, as previously explained.

If desired, the jacket may also be used to cool the body. In such case a cooling substance such as ice or Dry Ice may be placed within the pockets 33, in which case the liquid coolant in the system should be one which will not freeze readily.

I also contemplate omitting one or more of the reservoirs 3|, and the device may be used with a single pair of the reservoirs 3| or a single reservoir only, since the heaters 35 are capable of pro-- ducing an intense heat. By employing more than one reservoir and heater, it is of course possible to generate more heat and. to heat the body for a longer period of time. When a plurality of reservoirs and heaters are used, one chemical heater 5 at a time may be exhausted, and others adjusted to operate after the first heater is consumed or exhausted.

It is to be understood that the form of the invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Having thus described my invention I claim:

1. A body-warming garment including a body portion covering a substantial area of the body, tubes mounted upon the body portion and having compressible parts which bear against the wearer and are compressed when the wearer breathes, a liquid reservoir mounted upon the body portion and connected with the tubes and having a pocket formed therein, and a heating unit mounted within the pocket for transmitting heat to liquid contained within the reservoir and tubes.

2. A body-warming device comprising a flexible sheet to be arranged next to a portion of the body, tubes connected with the flexible sheet at the side of the same next to the body and having compressible parts for engagement with the body so that breathing compresses the parts, reservoir bags arranged upon the opposite side of the sheet and connected with the tubes for suppying liquid to the same and. having pockets therein, heating units disposed within the pockets, and one-Way check valves mounted within the tubes.

3. A body-warming device comprising supporting means to be mounted upon the body, a plurality of tubes carried by the supporting means and :4

having enlarged compressible bulb portions for contact with the body so that the bulb portions are compressed during breathing, common headers connected with the opposite ends of the tubes, a reservoir bag carried by the supporting means and having opposite ends connected with the common headers and being provided with a pocket, and a self-contained heater mounted within the pocket for transmitting heat to a liquid contained within the reservoir bag, tubes and headers.

4. A body warming garment comprising a body portion for covering a substantial area of the body between the waist and shoulders, tubes secured to the body portion and disposed upon the inner "side thereof next to the body and having compressible parts which bear against the body and are compressed when the wearer of the garment breathes, a self-contained heater mounted upon the outer side of the body portion, and a liquid container mounted upon the outer side of the body portion adjacent to the heater and arranged in thermal contact with the heater and communicating with the tubes, whereby heated liquid circulates through the tubes and warms the body as the wearer of the garment breathes.

5. A body warming device comprising supporting means for connection with the body, a plurality of flexible tubes carried by the supporting means and having enlarged compressible parts which bear against the body and are compressed when the wearer of the device breathes, flexible header tubes connected with the opposite ends of the first-named tubes and serving to place all of the tubes in communication, a liquid con- 5 tainer carried by the supporting means and connected with the header tubes and having spaced inner and outer walls, and a self-contained heater arranged inwardly of the inner wall of the container for transmitting heat to the liquid within the container.

6. A body warming device comprising supporting means to be mounted upon the body, a plurality of heat transfer tubes secured to the supporting means and extending longitudinally of the body between the shoulders and hips, the tubes being provided at longitudinally spaced intervals with enlarged compressible portions for contact with the body and adapted to be compressed during breathing, upper and lower headers connected with the upper and lower ends of the heat transfer tubes, a double walled liquid container secured to the supporting means and formed to provide a pocket inwardly of the Walls of the container, said container having opposite ends connected with the headers, a chemical heater mounted within the pocket of the container, and check valves mounted within the heat transfer tubes to permit liquid to flow therethrough in one direction only.

7. A body warming device comprising a jacket to be worn upon the trunk portion of the body, means carried by the jacket for drawing the jacket tightly about the body of the wearer, a plurality of flexible heat transfer tubes secured to the inner side of the jacket next to the body, each heat transfer tube having a plurality of longitudinally spaced enlarged compressible portions which bear against the body and are compressed and expanded during breathing, common headers connected with the opposite ends of the heat transfer tubes so that the tubes are in communication, and self-contained heating means mounted upon the jacket for heating liquid within the heat transfer tubes.

8. A body warming device comprising a jacket adapted to be bound tightly about the body of the wearer, a plurality of flexible heat transfer tubes secured to the inner side of the jacket and extending between the shoulder and waist portions of the body, each flexible tube having a plurality of longitudinally spaced compressible bulb portions which bear against the body and are compressed and expanded during breathing, the bulb portions of adjacent flexible tubes being staggered longitudinally of the tubes so that they interfit and cover the maximum area of the body, check valve means for each flexible tube to permit liquid to flow in one direction only within the tube, and self-contained heating means mounted upon the jacket for heating the liquid within the tubes.

PAUL A. SIPLE.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 546,436 Springsteen Sept. 17, 1895 912,527 Batter Feb. 16, 1909 1,287,549 Wilson Dec. 10, 1918 2,429,973 Alexander Nov. 4, 194;?

FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 1,749 Germany Jan. 8, 1878

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US546436 *Sep 17, 1895 Water-bandage
US912527 *Apr 26, 1906Feb 16, 1909Frank BatterPortable foot and body warmer.
US1287549 *Dec 7, 1915Dec 10, 1918Woodard Clarke & CoSurgical apparatus.
US2429973 *Jul 13, 1943Nov 4, 1947Horace L MacdonaldLife preserver with chemical heater
*DE1749C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2855758 *Apr 5, 1956Oct 14, 1958Tom R JohnsonChemical cooling garment and fabric
US3122891 *Dec 11, 1958Mar 3, 1964Air Prod & ChemCryogenic methods and apparatus
US3229681 *Aug 25, 1961Jan 18, 1966Ethyl CorpWarming suit
US3289748 *Sep 4, 1964Dec 6, 1966United Aircraft CorpHeat transfer garment
US3400756 *Jan 7, 1966Sep 10, 1968United Aircraft CorpThermal garment and the construction thereof
US3429315 *Nov 4, 1966Feb 25, 1969Chemi Temp CorpChemical refrigerant blanket
US3476102 *Sep 27, 1967Nov 4, 1969Sarnoff Stanley JThermal transfer garment and thermal transfer packet therefor
US3643463 *Apr 14, 1970Feb 22, 1972Friedlander Sidney LeePassive microclimate control system
US3738367 *Feb 11, 1971Jun 12, 1973Angelica CorpPatient garment with temperature control
US4334519 *Sep 15, 1980Jun 15, 1982Stanley CieslakPortable heater for generating and circulating heat in wearing apparel
US4441483 *Jan 27, 1982Apr 10, 1984Stanley CieslakPortable furnace for wearing apparel
US4575097 *Jun 1, 1984Mar 11, 1986Fastencold, Inc.Therapeutic device and method for forming and using same
US4685442 *Jan 20, 1987Aug 11, 1987Leonard CieslakPortable heater for wearing apparel
US4753241 *Mar 10, 1986Jun 28, 1988Fastencold, Inc.For providing moist heat treatment
US5029572 *Sep 25, 1989Jul 9, 1991Leblanc TomBody warming device
US5201365 *Jan 7, 1991Apr 13, 1993Israel SiegelWearable air conditioners
US5372608 *Aug 12, 1993Dec 13, 1994Johnson; Bertrand L.Circulating chilled-fluid therapeutic device
US5826273 *Jan 13, 1997Oct 27, 1998Eckes; Mark A.Thermal garment with pockets
US6128784 *Dec 2, 1999Oct 10, 2000Frank; Ronald H.Self-ventilating cooling vest
US7278978 *Aug 22, 2003Oct 9, 2007Electromed, Inc.Respiratory vest with inflatable bladder
US8105371 *Jan 11, 2011Jan 31, 2012Giocondo Jr Francis JComfort enhancing vest system
US8202237Apr 21, 2009Jun 19, 2012Electromed, Inc.Portable air pulsator and thoracic therapy garment
US8727825Dec 3, 2010May 20, 2014Alexander TsolkasLife jacket
US8793815Sep 1, 2013Aug 5, 2014Lillie P. Kelley-MozsyDetachable reconfigurable modular pocket assemblage
US20110041229 *Aug 18, 2009Feb 24, 2011Michael NiemiHot pox outdoor gear
US20120118282 *May 7, 2010May 17, 2012Save-Dummy, S.L.Insulating and heating safety device applicable to waterproof clothes and work clothes
WO2011066820A1 *Dec 3, 2010Jun 9, 2011Alexander TsolkasLife jacket
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/204, 62/259.3, 62/293, 2/102, 165/46, 607/104
International ClassificationA61F7/02, A41D13/005, A61F7/03
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2007/0273, A61F2007/0001, A41D13/0051, A61F7/02, A61F7/03, A61F2007/0238
European ClassificationA41D13/005B, A61F7/02