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Publication numberUS2648502 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1953
Filing dateMay 31, 1949
Priority dateMay 31, 1949
Publication numberUS 2648502 A, US 2648502A, US-A-2648502, US2648502 A, US2648502A
InventorsTrofimov Lev A
Original AssigneeTrofimov Lev A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Power winding of strip material
US 2648502 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1953 ov 2,648,502

' POWER WINDING 0F STRIP MATERIAL Filed May 31, 1949 INVE NTOR. 16 7702917701 BY W ' HTTOEJVE) Patented Aug. 11, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE POWER WINDING F STRIP MATERIAL Lev A. Trofimov, Willoughby, Ohio Application May 31, 1949, Serial No. 96,372

21 Claims. 1

This invention relates to power winding of strip materials, wire, etc. onto drums, reels, or the like; and particularly to apparatus for controlling the rotary speed of the drum and the tension of the strip, as the diameter of the roll of material being wound on the drum increases.

The invention is particularly applicable to the winding of materials onto a drum rotatively driven by a motor, when the material is supplied to the drum at a known linear speed, for example, as the material comes from a material producing or processing apparatus or machinery, and it is desired to control the tension of the strip.

The diameter of the accumulating roll of material being wound on a drum is, of course, small at the start of the winding operation, and increases as the winding proceeds; and, when the material is supplied to the drum at a known average speed or substantially constant speed, increasing tension will develop in the strip, in the absence of some mean to prevent it, and the tension may reach values damagin to the strip, or even to the apparatus to which it is connected, and from which it is supplied.

It is evident and known that if the tension is to be prevented from increasing in direct proportion to the increasing diameter of the roll, the speed of the drum must be reduced as winding goes on. But beyond this one essential requirement, controls as thus far devised in this art have differed as to their essential characteristics and fall into two general classes, corresponding to two different concepts about winding.

In one class as the motor speed is reduced, tension in the strip is maintained constant, the motor developing increasing torque at decreasing speed or constant horsepower.

In the other class as the motor speed is reduced, the torque is maintained constant, the tension in the strip decreases as winding goes on, and the motor develops a tapering or decreasing horsepower.

There are cases to which each of these classes of control is adapted; but neither of them is satisfactory for all cases because of diiferences in the materials that may be wound.

In the first case, the constant tension control, if the strip material is fabric or is linoleum or paper or cellophane for example, then when the diameter or radius of the roll increases, the tangential force on it outer convolutions may cause the inner convolutions to slip on each other and become more tightly wound, and in some cases cause the inner convolutions to buckle and damage them; and if the strip has a pattern on it, the slipping of the inner convolutions may mutilate the pattern, and if it is a printed pattern and not entirely dry, it will be smeared.

If the constant tension is adjustably reduced to avoid this control defect at the inner convolutions, then the outer convolutions will be so loosely wound as to untelescope when the roll is handled.

In the second case, or constant torque case, the inner convolutions are tightly wound and the outer convolution more loosely wound, and for a roll of any considerable final diameter the outer convolutions will be too loose and Will untelescope when handled; and to prevent this the inner convolutions must be wound to excessive or even damaging tightness.

The ideal control would be one which is adapted to wind any kind of material satisfactorily and without such disadvantages as those mentioned above, by being universally adjustable, to apply motor power to the drum at decreasing speed and at constant tension in the strip; or at changing tension, increasing or decreasing; and in the case of changing tension, adjustable to vary the rate of change of the tension as the roll diameter increases to suit the requirements of the particular installation and material.

And as a further characteristic of such ideal control, it should be one that could be initially manufactured to embody alternatively or optionally any of the desired characteristics of tension control, for a given installation without having to adjust it.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a power operated winding control of this universally adjustable character; and one which, alternatively, can be constructed originally to respond without adjustment, to develop a predetermined tension in the strip material as winding goes on.

The invention departs from prior practice in the fundamental concept of the control. According to the invention, the power to drive the winding drum is supplied by a motor; any type or class of motor, and preferably an electric motor; but the speed of the motor is not regulated or controlled. It runs continuously at all times at full speed.

The motor power is transmitted to the drum through a transmission, which responds automatically to the tendency of the strip tension to change, to develop in the strip the desired tension.

The transmission comprises two mechanically intermeshed difierential gearings; and an electric generator and an electric motor, associated with the gearings respectively; and the motor 3 and generator are interconnected electrically, and energized respectively by adjustable field windings, in a manner to be described.

The transmission is thus electro-mechanical, and responds as referred to, with-out the agency of any other mechanical regulating parts; and without any other electric regulating parts, the electrical response all taking place in closed elec- .trical circuits.

The physical embodiment of the invention by which it may be practiced may be considered as an electro-mechanical transmission (as referred to) adapted to be supplied with power from a motor; or may be considered as a p wer supplying unit, including the power supplying motor.

Beside the said primary object, other objects are:

To provide an apparatus comprising a transmission for transmitting the power of a ower supplying motor to a winding drum to drive it to wind strip material thereon, the transmission constructed to respond automatically to the tendmay of the tension in the strip to increase as vifinding goes on, in a manner to develop a desired tension in the strip.

To provide such a transmission having means to predetermine a desired tension that will develop in the strip as winding goes on, whether it be constant tension; or variable tension.

To provide a transmission as referred to comprising differential gearing through which power the power supplying motor is transmitted to the drum, with the motor always running at full speed; and means to automatically vary the torque transmitted to the drum comprising an electric generator diiferentially driven by the gearing and supplying current to drive an electric motor connected to the gearing, to develop torques at the, generator and motor, and corresponding torques at the drum, and fields for the generator and motor, which determine by their strength the torques developed thereat.

An, embodiment of the invention is fully disclosed in the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which: t

Fig. 1 is a View, illustrating in diagrammatic form an electro mechanical transmission, or power supplying unit, embodying the invention in a preferred form; and, v

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view of a part of Fig. 1 illustrating a modification; and,

'Figs. 3 and 4 are fragmentary views similar to a part of Fig, 1, illustrating other modifications.

The electro-mechanical apparatus of Fig. 1 (whether considered as a power transmission, or as a power supplying unit including the, power supplying motor as referred to) comprises differential gearings at l and 2.

In the gearing l is a spider element 3, rotatably supporting pinions 4'4 meshed with differential gears 5-BJ In the gearing 2 is a spider element 1, rotatably supporting pinions 8+8 meshed with differential gears 9lfl. 'CoaXially connected to the differential gear is a gear I I.

The gear I l and the spider element 3 have gear teeth on their respective peripheries as at l2-I 3 meshed with respective gears Ml 5 on. the shaft !6 ofa powersupplying motor H, whichmay be a motor of any class or type, but which is preferably an electric motor as shown, and for illustrative purposes is a squirrel-cage induction motor, energized from mains l8 8.

The differential gears 5 and 9 are connected 4 by respective shafts l9-2l!, to gears 2I22, both meshed with a gear 23 on an output shaft 24 connected directly to a winding drum 25 (or if preferred, connected to the drum through speed change gears not shown).

Strip material to be wound on the drum 25 is shown at 26 as drawn from or propelled from a processing or producing apparatus 21 An electric generator G, preferably ofthe direct current type, is connected by a shaft 28 to the differential gear 6.

An electric motor M, is connected to the spider element? by a shaft 29 passing with clearance t rou h a coaxial bore 30 in the gear H and differential gear 50. p

The generator- G has a series field winding 3| and the motor M has a series field Winding 32.

Th e motor M and generator G are electrically connected by a loop conductor 33.

As shown, a permanently closed circuitis provided comprising in series, the conductor 33, the motor M, the generator G, and their series field. windings SI and 32.

The effective ampere turns of the series field windings 2H and 32 are respectively adjustable by rheostats 3'4 and 35 bridging them.v

The generator G and. motor M. have respective shunt field windings 36, and 31; energized with unidirectional current from supply mains 38139Q,

by WiresfiEl-Jl [-42 fromthe mai1 i 38.to one, side v of the fields, and by wires AB-J Iv from main39;

to the other side of the fields. Theeffective, am-

'pere turns of the shunt-field windings SB, and. 2"? are respectively adjustable bymanual rheostats; 45. and dBin the line of thewires Hand 44-, in,

series with the field windings.

The field windings 3631 will preferably. bewound in the same direction for economy in man-.

ui'acture, but when connected as shown anddescribed, current. will now oppositely,in-them and the fields produced by the windings will be ofropposite polarity.

The series field windings 3i and 32: also are connected in the said series .circuitfor opposite: polarity, that is to say, current flowing in the; circuit from the generator Gto the motor M (as will be referred to) flows in the series field 3-1.

in the direction to weaken the generator field (produced by the shunt. field winding 36) and flows in the series field 32in the; direction to augment the motor field (produced by the shunt field winding 3 l) Before describing the operation of the inven:-.

tion, to perform as referred to, certain characteristics may first be considered.

The main motor [1 puts power by gear 15% into differential gearing l at the spider element 3 and, in the nature of differential gearings, torque. at the spider element3qdivides. between thev differential gears 56, part going to the gear 2|- tending to. drive .it in the same direction as the spider element 3;. and the gear 2| tending to drive the gear 23, outputshaft 24,- and drum 25- in the winding direction; and the other half going to thegenerator G tending to. drive. it' in thesame direction as the spider element.

Thus, at the differential gearing I, the gear 2|- reacts on the output gear 23 and thereby-on: thev drum load to bedriven, and causes the generator G to be driven; and electrical load on the generator retards it-andcauses the gearingtorreact1 on the generator and develop load driving torque,

..atthegear2l.

At the. gearing. 2, the. differential gear Hland. gear ll being connected to the motor "H by gear element 3.

I4, are constrained thereby to run in the same direction as the spider element 3 of gearing and the gears 3 and run at constant speeds. The motor M being connected to the gearing 2 therefore has its speed determined for it by the gearing.

However, as will be described later, the motor M, while compelled to rotate at a speed determined for it by the gearing, is not driven by the gearing, but is electrically driven by current from the generator G, and therefore tends (or tries) to run at a speed greater than that determined for it by the gearing, and therefore puts motor torque in at the spider I.

The torque of the electrically driven motor M acting through the spider 1, divides between the differential gears 9 and I0, part going to the gear 22, and in the same direction as the torque applied to the gear 2|, that is, in the drum winding direction; and this part of the motor torque is applied to the drum load. The other part of the motor torque goes to the gears Ill-l and thence through the gear M to the shaft N of the main motor I7, and in the same direction as the torque of the main motor.

Thus, in general, the motor M and generator G are driven in the same direction; the electrical load of the generator G exerts a brake action, which causes torque to be developed at the gear 2| to drive the drum 25 in the winding direction;

the generator electrical load drives the motor M;

the energy of braking at the generator G is not lost but is all recovered and returned into the gearing by transformation at the motor M; part of the energy developed at the motor M develops torque at the gear 22 and the drum 25 in the winding direction, and is recovered thereat; the rest of the energy of motor M develops torque at the gears Iii-l l which goes to the main motor l7 and is recovered thereat; the drum is driven by the joint torque of the generator G and motor M at the gears 2| and 22.

As described and as is apparent, the speeds of the spider 3 of gearing and of the gears |||0 of the gearing 2 are fixed. While in same cases the ratio of the gears |53 and |4|| may be such that the gears 3 and I run at equal speeds, there are advantages that will appear in having these gear ratios such that the gear 3 runs at greater speed than the gear H, and these gears have been illustrated with such ratios.

The gears 2| and 22 (assumed for simplification to be of like diameter) are both constrained to run at the same speed by the gear 23. The speeds of the generator G and motor M, however, are different; and the speed ratio thereof varies with the speed of the drum and gear 23, and this being important will now be discussed.

Assuming, as a special case to make the explanation clearer, that the drum and gear 23 are at rest, or nearly so, the gear 2| and the differential gear 5, Will be at rest. The difierential gear 6 and generator G will therefore rotate at maximum speed, twice the speed of the driving spider The gear 22 and differential gear 9 are also at rest, and the spider I will therefore be constrained to rotate at one half of the speed of the differential gear l3 and driving gear I in spite of any effort of the motor M to make them go faster.

The speeds of the spider element 3 and differential gear it being in a ratio greater than 1-to-1 (as assumed above) the generator G will therefore be driven faster than the motor M.

For higher drum speeds, the speed of the gen-.

6 erator G will be lower and the speed of the 'motor M will be higher, and the speed ratio will be less, as is believed to be apparent, resulting from the nature of difierential gearing.

The operation of the invention will now be described. As shown, the roll of material 26 on the drum 25 is ready for Winding to begin.

The rheostats 45 and 46 are set to energize the shunt fields 363| at suitable values, to be referred to, and to make the explanation simpler, it will first be assumed that they alone energize the generator and motor fields, for example by short circuiting the series fields 3| and 32 by their rheostats 34 and 35. The polarities of the shunt fields are predetermined to be correct for the generator G and motor M to run in the same direction, with the generator G electrically driving the motor M.

The main motor having been started and having attained full running speed, torque applied by it to the spider element 3 divides between the gear 2| and generator G; the gear 2| reacts on the drum-gear 23 and causes the generator to be driven; the generator G generates load current and delivers it through the motor M in the closed local series circuit comprising the loop 33; and the load on the generator G brakes it and causes torque to be applied at the gear 2| to the drum gear 23 and to the drum 25 in the winding direction.

The electrically driven motor M drives the spider 'i, and the spider reacts on the constantspeed rotating gear I0 and causes the gear 22 to exert torque on the drum gear 23 in the Winding direction.

It is the current through the motor M and generator G acting on their fields that produces torques at the gears 2| and 22 and the joint torque thereof is applied to the winding drum gear 23.

As referred to, the linear speed of the strip 26 is predetermined at the apparatus 21, and a preselected tension in the strip is wanted as winding begins. 7

The joint torque of the gears 2| and 22 can be adjusted, to give this initial tension, that is, adjusted for any particular installation, speed of strip 26, particular strip material, minimum diameter of drum 25, etc., by adjusting the motor and genera-tor current by adjusting their fields at their rheostats 45-46 as will be more fully described; and when the tension has been adjusted, there will be a speed of the drum corresponding to it; and this speed will be the maximum speed; and the gears 2| and 22 being geared to the drum gear 23 will have a corresponding maximum speed.

At this high speed of the gears 2 |-22, the generator G will havev a relatively low speed, and the motor M a relatively high speed, due to the gearing interconnections, as explained hereinbefore.

The potential of the generator G at this low speed will be relatively low; and the relatively high speed of the motor M will give the motor relatively high counterpotential, in opposition to that of the generator; and the current produced by the generator and driving the motor, and producing the said joint torque will therefore be relatively low.

As the winding then proceeds, and the roll diameter on the drum increases, the tension in the strip 26 acts on an increasing radius; the said joint torque exerted on it, is not able to continue to drive it at the same speed, and it slows down;

and this slows down the gear 23 and the equalspeed gears 2| and 22. y i

demand 7 'The generator G thereupon responds to go faster; and the motor M is constrained by the gearing to go slower; this being inherent in the gearing as described above.

The potential of the generator G, accordingly rises, and the opposing counterpotential of the motor falls; and more generator current accordingly flows. Phis loads and brakes the generator G more, and it produces more torque at the gear 2|, and the increased current in the motor produces more torque at the gear 22, and the joint torque rises.

Thus as the roll diameter increases, the current increases and more torque is applied to the drum and tends to maintain the strip tension at decreasing drum speed.

The strength of the fields of the generator G and motor M can be adjusted to maintain the strip tension at a substantially constant, preselected value, if desired, and this mode of operation will now first be explained.

For some intermediate strengths of the motor and generator fields, determined by a setting of the rheostats 55-48 (assuming the series windings 3| and 32 to be out out as refered to), the relatively low speed of the generator G and relatively high speed of the motor M will cause a certain current to flow and develop certain torques at the gears 2| and 22. The rheostats can be adjusted until a current value is produced that produces a joint torque that gives the desired strip tension.

As described, the current increases as winding goes on, and this increases the joint torque, It has been found that the increase of current and joint torque is in general proportional to the increase of roll diameter, so that the tension tends to remain-constant. Any deviation from this proportionality will be in the direction of too fast an increase of current and torque due to the increasing speed ratio of the generator and motor speeds as described, and in the direction of increasing tension. This may be corrected by introducing resistance at the rheostat 34 to divert some of the current into the generator reverse series field winding 3|, which will be in the direction to weaken the generator field.

The generator and motor shunt fields due to the windings 3e and 31 remaining unchanged, whatever current flows reacts on these fields to produce torque as before, the only difference being that the current and torque now will not increase as rapidly as before, and, by the series field adjustment, can be caused to increase at a rate to keepthe strip tension substantially constant.

If as referred to it be desired to have the tension in the strip decrease as winding goes on instead of remaining substantially constant as described; the amount of current diverted into the generator series field winding 3| by the rheostat 34 may be adjustable increased, so that the rate of increase of current and torque with increase of roll radius will be reduced. And similarly if it be desired to have the tension increase, the amount of current diverted to the winding 3| may be'decrea'sed.

By these adjustment means, which can be set and fixed, thedes'i-red tension in the strip roan be set at the beginning of the winding operation, and will be maintained at substantially constant tension as winding proceeds and the roll increases in diameter; or can be made to be an increasing tension; or made to be a decreasing tension; and when the tension is to be increasing-or 8 decreasing, its rate of change for increasing roll diameter can likewise be adjusted.

Having described the universal adjustment in some detail, a more generalized formulation thereof may now be iven.

The fields of the generator G and motor M are adjusted at the windings 3G and 31 to fixed constant values, and may be considered as base fields. The generator G due to its base field generates current which drives the motor M. The current reacts on the base fields of both the generator and motor to develop torque and their joint torque is applied on the winding drum 24; and the joint torque produces tension in the strip 26.

The joint torque may be adjusted to the particular material and installation, by adjusting the strength of the base fields to adjust the strip tension at the beginning of winding.

The generated current increases as winding goes on, due to speeding up of the generator and slowing down of the motor and the joint torque accordingly increases; but increasing torque is in general needed on the drum due to the increasing radius of the roll. The increasing current reacting on the base fields automatically provides increasing torque.

Due to fixed base field strength, the rate of torque increase is commensurable with the rate of current increase.

If constant tension on the strip is wanted, and if for any reason the current does not increase at the rate to give constant tension, the rate of increase of the current can be adjusted to bring this about by adjusting the effectiveness of the series field winding 3 In general the current will tend to increase too rapidly for constant tension and the series field winding 3| will accordingly need to be a reverse winding, and the current in the winding will weaken the field and reduce the rate of current increase, without affectin the base field strength.

A similar slowing down of the rate of current increase can be produced by adjusting the motor series field winding 32, which strengthens its field and increases its countervoltage.

Obviously, if for any reason the current should tend to increase too slowly for constant tension, its rate of increase can be accelerated to give constant tension by making the series winding 3| an assisting winding instead of a reverse winding. An arrangement to do this is shown in the modification of Fig. 2, where the winding 3| is provided with a reversing switch 41 to reverse the direction of current in the winding, subject in value to the rheostat 34.

If a decreasing tension is wanted in the strip, calling for a still greater decrease in the rate at which the current increases, the opposition by the series field winding 3| can be adjusted to be more efiective.

If an increasing tension in the strip is wanted, calling for an increase in the rate of current increase, the opposition of the series winding 3| can be made completely ineffective, or the winding can even be made to assist by utilizing the throw reversing switch 41 in the modification of Fig. 2.

It being a part of the invention to make the transmission universally adjustable, adjustable rheostats 45--46 for the shunt field windings and rheostats 34-35 for the series field windings have been illustrated and the universal adjustment of the transmission thereby has been described. However, as contemplated by the objects of the invention, these adjustments are not in every case necessary and may be omitted. Given the data of an installation as to drum diameter, strip speed, etc. and the requirements of performance as to desired tension in the strip; and knowing the characteristics of the transmission as to the potential of the unidirectional current mains 38-39 and the number of turns in the several field windings, etc., then fixed resistances may be provided in place of the rheostats; or the number of turns in the field windings may be preselected, and utilized without either fixed resistances r rheostats.

The apparatus may therefore be originally built to give the desired strip tension (constant, increasing or decreasing), without making it adjustable.

As described, the gear 3 of gearing I, and the gear I 0 (or gears IO-I I) of gearing 2, run at constant speeds, and at a fixed speed ratio, and this is preferably done by interconnecting them together. Absolutely constant speeds for these gears are not essential and are not even actually present in the arrangement of Fig. 1 because of the slightly variable slip of the induction motor I'I under variable load. Also, an absolutely fixed speed ratio therebetween is not essential; but is preferable because of simplification of the gearings which it makes possible.

In Fig. 1, the preferably fixed speed ratio and substantially constant speeds are both provided by rotatively connecting the gear 3 and gear ID (or gears I0-I I) to the power motor I! by gears I and I4 on the motor shaft I6.

An advantage results from the described arrangement in that it makes possible a free circulation of power within the transmission that contributes to the recovery of power from the generator G without loss as referred to.

That is, power from the motor I1 goes to the spider gear 3; a part of its goes to the generator G and thence to the motor M, and to the spider I; and a part of the power to the spider I goes to the gear ID (or gears IIi-I I), and thence to gear I4. At this point, the power from the spider 'I may be considered as going from the gear I4 back to the power motor IT, or may be considered as going from the gear I4 to gear I5 and thence to gear 3, which is the same thing, be-

cause in either case, the power assists the motor and substantially constant speeds and circulation of power can be had with other arrangements than that of Fig. 1.

For example as shown in simplified form in Fig. 3, the spider 3 may be driven by the motor I I, through a gear 48, as shown in solid line, and the spider 3 may be rotatively connected to the gear II through an idler gear 48, the gears 3 and II being of appropriate relative diameters.

Or as indicated in Fig. 3 in dotted line the motor I! may be connected to the gear II by a gear 50.

In this connection and as indicating the scope of the invention, the desirable substantially constant speeds and speed ratio of the gears 3 and II) (or I0-I I) may be provided without the above described or any interconnection between them; and one possible modification for doing this is shown in Fig. 4.

Here, the gear 3 of gearing I is driven as before by the induction motor I] through a gear 10 I5, and therefore runs at a substantially constant speed as before.

The gear II is geared by a gear 5| to another induction motor 52, and the output torque at the gear II drives the motor 52 above synchronous speed as a generator, and it supplies electrical load current back to its energizing supply lines 53 without loss of the energy driving it. As is known, when an induction motor is thus energized and driven above synchronous speed as a generator, it develops load torque that increases very rapidly. The speed of the gear II therefore will be prevented from the increasing except very little and will therefore be constrained to run at substantially constant speed. In consequence, both gears 3 and II have substantially constant speeds and a substantially constant speed ratio.

It follows that changes and modifications may be made in the transmission as described for Fig. 1 without departing from the spirit of the invention or sacrificing its advantages and the invention is comprehensive of all such changes and modifications that come within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A power transmission for driving a rotary load, comprising: an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second difierential gearing, each comprising a spider element rotatably supporting a pinion and two differential gear elements meshed with the pinion; the spider element of the first gearing and a difierential gear of the second gearing being interconnected to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio and adapted to be connected to a power supplying motor; a differential gear of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by it; the spider element of the second gearing connected to the electric motor to be driven by it; means adapting the other difierential gears of the gearings to be connected to the load to drive it at predetermined respective speed ratios with the load at all speeds of the load. i

2. A power transmission for driving a rotary load, comprising: an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second differential gearing each having three rotary elements; a rotary element of each gearing interconnected to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio and adapted to be connected to a power supplying motor; another rotary element of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by it; another rotary element of the second gearing connected to the motor to be driven by it; connection means at the third rotary elements of the gearings adapting them to be connected to the load to drive it, and to each be constrained to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio with the load at all speeds of the load; the respective rotary elements that are interconnected being selected to cause the speed of the generator to increase and the speed of the electric motor to decrease as the speed of the load decreases.

3. In an apparatus for winding on a drum or the like, strip material that is supplied to the drum at a substantially constant linear speed, and for concurrently controlling the tension in the strip; an electric generator; an electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by generator current; a first and a second gearing comprising each a rotary power output element; the first gearing having a rotary power receiving element adapted to receive power from a constantly running power motor, and the first gearing adapted to transmit power diiierentially to the generator, and to the drum through the rotary output element of the first gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; the second gearing having a rotary element interconnected at a predetermined speed ratio with the power receiving element of the first gearing; the second gearingadapted to receive power from the electric motor and transmit it differentially to the said interconnected rotary element, and to the drum through the output element of the second gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; the said inter= connected rotary element and power receiving ele ment being preselected in the gearings to cause the generator speed to increase and the motor speed to decrease as the speed of the drum decreases upon increase of diameter of the roll of material being wound thereon, and to effect a corresponding increase of generator current to the electric motor; respective exciting field wind ings for the generator and motor, and circuit means for energizing them with current; means to adjustably vary the energizing current of the field windings to vary the current produced by the generator and correspondingly vary the torque of the electric motor and of the generator to correspond ingly vary the torques difierentially transmitted to the drum to correspondingly adjust the tension in the strip.

4. An apparatus as described in claim 3 and in which the generator field has an auxiliary field winding energized proportionally to the gencrator current; and means is provided to adjustably vary the effective ampere turns of the auxiliary field winding to correspondingly adjust the rate of increase of the generator current as its speed increases.

5. In an apparatus for winding on a drum or the like, strip material that is supplied to the drum at a substantially constant linear speed, for concurrently controlling the tension in the strip; an electric generator; an electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by generator current; a first and a second gearing comprising each a rotary power output element; the first gearing having a rotary power receiving element adapted to receive power from a constantly running power motor, and the first gearing adapted to transmit power differentially to the generator, and to the drum through the rotary output element of the first gearing at, a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; the second gearing having a rotary element interconnected at a prev determined speed ratio with the power receiving element of the first gearing; the second gearing adapted to receive power from the electric motor and transmit it difierentially to the said interconnected rotary element, and to the; drum through the output element of the second gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to Wind the strip on the drum; the said interconnected rotary element and power receiving element being preselected in the gearings to cause the generator speed to increase and the motor speed to decrease as the speed of the drum decreases upon increase of diameter of the roll of material being wound thereon, and to efiect a corresponding change of generator current to the electric motor; respective exciting field; windings for the generator and motor, and circuit means for energizing them with current; means to ad justably vary the energizing current of the field windings to vary the current produced by the generator and correspondingly vary the torque of the electric motor and of the generator to correspondingly vary the torques differentially transmitted to the drum to correspondingly adjust the tension in the strip; the generator having an auxiliary field winding energized proportionally to the generator current; and means to adjustably vary the effective ampere turns of the auxiliary field winding to correspondingly adjust the rate of change of the generator current as its speed increases, to correspondingly modify the said adjusted tension in the strip to cause it to be op tionally substantially a constant tension or a dc creasing tension or an increasing tension as the diameter of the wound material on the drum increases.

6. In an apparatus for driving a winding drum to wind thereon strip material supplied thereto at a substantially constant rate and to concurrently control the tension in the strip; an electric generator and an electric motor and an intercom necting circuit between them for electrically driving the motor by current from the generator: respective field windings for the generator and motor and circuit means for adjustably encrgiaing them; a difierential gearing transmission to which the generator and motor are mechanically connected; the transmission comprising two rotary output elements, and being arranged to re ceive power from a continuously running power motor and from the electric motor, and to differentially drive the generator and to apply said power to develop respective torques at the rotary output elements determined in value by the adjusted energization of the fields and the corresponding value of generator current; connection means at the rotary output elements for drivingly connecting them to the drum to apply both said torques thereto to drive the drum in the winding direction, to cause the drum to wind the strip thereon in a roll of increasing radius and to develop tension in the strip, determined in value by the generated current effected by the adjust ment of the fields; and the connection means between the rotary output elements and the drum being such as to cause the rotary elements to each have a constant speed ratio with the drum and whereby upon a decrease of drum speed caused by increasing roll radius, the transmission reacts to cause the generator to increase in speed and the motor to decrease in speed, to cause the generator to develop more current in itself and in the motor to cause the said torques to increase and maintain tension in the strip.

7. In an apparatus for driving a winding drum to wind thereon strip material supplied thereto at a substantially constant rate and to concurrently control the tension in the strip; an electric generator and an electric motor and an interconnecting circuit between them for electrically driving the motor by current from the generator; respective field windings for the generator and motor and circuit means for adjustably energizing them; a differential gearing transmission to which the generator and motor are mechanically connected; the transmission comprising two rotary output elements, and being arranged to. receive power from a continuously running power motor and from the electric motor, and to differentially drive the generator and to apply said power to develop respective torques at the rotary output elements determined in value by the adjusted energization of the fields and the corresponding value of generator current; connection means at the rotary output elements for drivingly connecting them to the drum to apply both said torques thereto to drive the drum in the winding direction, to cause the drum to wind the strip thereon in a roll of increasing radius and to develop tension in the strip, determined in value by the generated current effected by the adjustment of the fields; and the connection means between the rotary output elements and the drum being such as to cause the rotary elements to each have a constant speed ratio with the drum and whereby upon a decrease of drum speed caused by increasing roll radius, the transmission reacts to cause the generator to increase in speed and the motor to decrease in speed, to cause the generator to tend to develop more current in itself and in the motor to cause the said torques to tend to increase and maintain tension in the strip; a series field Winding for the generator in which the generated current fiows; and means to adjust the effectiveness of the ampere turns of the series field winding to modify the tendency of the current to increase, to optionally adjustably cause the tension in the strip to be substantially constant or to increase or to decrease.

8. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator, and an electric motor, and an interconnecting circuit by which current from the generator drives the motor; a first differential gearing comprising two rotary power output elements and a rotary .power input element and transmission means arranged to transmit power to the input element from a continuously running power supplying motor, to drive it at a speed commensurable with that of the power supplying motor, and one output element connected to the electric generator to drive it; a second difierential gearing comprising two rotary power output elements, and a rotary power input element, the power input element connected to the electric motor to be driven thereby, and an output element having a driving connection with the input element of the first gearing which constrains them to run at a predetermined speed ratio; respective field windings for the generator and motor and circuit means for energizing them at selected values; and the other output elements of the two gearings being respectively connected to a winding drum to drive it in the winding direction by connections that constrain them to rotate always at speeds commensurable with that of the drum; and the output elements of the differential gearings to which said drum connections are made being preselected to cause the speed of the generator to increase and the speed of the motor to decrease upon a decrease of speed of the drum.

9. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator and an electric motor and interconnecting circuit means between them by which the motor is driven by generator current; a first differential gearing comprising a power input spider element rotatably supporting a pinion, and two output differential gears meshed with the pinion, and transmission means arranged to transmit power to the spider element from a continuously running power supplying motor to drive it at a speed commensurable with that of the motor and one output differential gear connected to the generator to drive it; a second difierential gearing comprising a spider element rotatably supporting a pinion and two output differential gears meshed with the pinion, and the spider element being connected to the electric motor to be driven thereby, and one output differential gear and the spider element of the first gearing having a connection therebetween that constrains them to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio; respective field windings for the electric motor and generator and circuit means for energizing them at selected values; the other two output differential gears of the two gearings adapted to be connected respectively to a winding drum by connections through which they both drive the drum in the winding direction and which maintains predetermined speed ratios between them respectively and the drum at all speeds of the drum.

10. In an apparatus for driving a winding drum to wind 'a roll of strip material thereon supplied thereto at a constant linear speed; an electric generator and an electric motor, interconnected electrically to cause the motor to be driven by generator current; a power supplying motor; a difierential gearing transmission, comprising a rotary element adapted to receive power from the power supplying motor; and comprising a pair of rotary elements adapted to be connected to a winding drum; and comprising rotary elements connected respectively to the generator to drive it and to the electric motor to be driven by it; and differentially transmitting generator load torque and electric motor driving torque to the pair of rotary drum driving elements to drive the drum in the winding direction; the rotary elements selectively arranged to drive the generator at increasing speed and to constrain the motor to run at decreasing speed upon decreasing speed of the drum caused by increasing radius of the material roll being wound on the drum.

11. An apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load comprising: an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second differential gearing; the first gearing adapted to receive power at a power receiving element at substantially constant speed thereof from a continuously running power supplying motor and to differentially transmit the power to a first and a second rotary element of the gearing and from the second rotary element to the generator to drive it; electric circuit means to which the generator supplies load current to the electric motor to electrically drive it; the second gearing adapted to receive power at a power receiving element from the electric motor and differentially transmit the power to a first and a second rotary element of the second gearing; means constraining the second rotary element of the second gearing to run at substantially constant speed; power transmitting connections at the respective first rotary elements of the gearings adapted to drivingly connect the rotary elements to a winding drum to both drive it in the winding direction, and to constrain the rotary elements to have predetermined respective speed ratios with the drum at all speeds of the drum; the rotary elements to which the electric motor and generator are connected being selected to cause the generator to increase in speed and the motor to decrease in speed upon a decrease in speed of the drum caused by increasing radius of the strip material being wound on the drum.

12. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second differential gearing each having three rotary elenients; means for constraining a rotary element of each gearing to rotate at substantially constant speeds, said means for one of the rotary elements being a substantially constant speed power supplying motor, to which it is adapted to be connected; another rotary element of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by it; another rotary velement of the second gearing connected to the motor to be driven by it; connection means at the third rotary elements of the gearings adapting them to be connected to a winding drum to drive it in the winding direction, and to each be constrained to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio with the drum at all speeds of the drum; the rotary elements to which the electric motor and generator are connected being selected to cause the generator to increase in speed and the motor to decrease in speed upon a decrease in speed of the drum caused by increasing radius of the strip material being wound on the drum.

13. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second differential gearing, each comprising a spider element rotatably supporting a pinion and two differential gear elements meshed with the pinion; means for constraining the spider element of the first gearing and a differential gear of the second gearing to rotate at substantially constant speeds, said means for the spider element being a substantially constant speed power supplying motor to which it is adapted to be connected; a differential gear of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by it; the spider element of the second gearing connected to the electric motor to be driven by it; means adapting the other differentialv gears of the gearings to be connected to the drum to drive it in the winding direction at predetermined respective speed ratios with the drum at all speeds of the drum.

let. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator; an electric motor; a first and a second difierential gearing each having three rotary elements; means constraining a rotary element of each gearing to run at substantially constant speed, the said means for the rotary element of the first gearing being a substantially constant speed power supplying motor to which it is adapted to be connected; another rotary element of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by it; another rotary element of the second gearing, connected to the motor to be driven by it; connection means at the third rotary elements of the gearings adapting them to be connected to a winding drum to drive it in the winding direction, and to each be constrained to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio with the drum at all speeds of the drum; the respective rotary elements that are constrained to run at constant speed being selected to cause the speed of the generator to increase and the speed of the electric motor to decrease as the speed of the drum decreases.

15. In an apparatus for winding on a drum or the like, strip material that is supplied to the drum at a substantially constant linear speed,

and for concurrently controlling the tension in the strip; an electric generator; an electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by generator current; a first and a second gearing comprising each a rotary power output element; the first gearing having a rotary power receiving element adapted to receive power at substantially constant speed from a constantly running power motor, and the first gearing adapted to transmit power diiferentially to the generator, and to the drum through the rotary output element of the first gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; means constraining a rotary element of the second gearing to run at substantially constant speed; the second gearing adapted to receive power from the electric motor and transmit it differentially to the said constant speed rotary element of the second gearing, and to the drum through the output element of the second gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; the said constantspeed rotary elements being preselected in the gearings to cause the generator speed to increase and the motor speed to decrease as the speed of the drum decreases upon increase of diameter of the roll of material being wound thereon, and to efiect a corresponding increase of generator current to the electric motor; respective exciting field windings for the generator and motor, and circuit means for energizing them with current; means to adjustably vary the energizing current of the field windings to vary the current produced by the generator and correspondingly vary the torque of the electric motor and of the generator to correspondingly vary the torques differentially transmitted to the drum to correspondingly adjust the tension in the strip.

16. In an apparatus for winding on a drum or the like, strip material that is supplied to the drum at a substantially constant linear speed, and for concurrently controlling the tension in the strip; an electric generator; an electric motor electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by generator current; a first and a second gearing comprising each a rotary power output element; the first gearing having a rotary power receiving element adapted to receive power at substantially constant speed from a constantly running power motor, and the first gearing adapted to transmit power differentially to the generator, and to the drum through the rotary output element of the first gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; means constraining a rotary element of the second gearing to run at substantially constant speed; the second gearing adapted to reecive power from the electric motor and transmit it differentially to the said constant speed rotary element of the second gearing, and to the drum through the output element of the second gearing at a predetermined speed ratio and in the direction to wind the strip on the drum; the said constant speed rotary elements being preselected in the gearings to cause the generator speed to increase and the motor speed to decrease as the speed of the drum decreases upon increase of diameter of the roll of material being wound thereon, and to eirect a corresponding change of generator current to the electric motor; respective exciting field windings for the generator and motor, and circuit means for energizing them with current; means to adjustably vary the energizing current of the field windings 17 to vary the current produced by the generator and correspondingly vary the torque of the electric motor and of the generator to correspondingly vary the torques differentially transmitted to the dr'umto correspondingly adjust the tension in the strip; the generator having an auxiliary field winding energized proportionally to the generator current; and means to adjustably vary the effective ampere turns of the auxiliary field winding to correspondingly adjust the rate of change of the generator current as its speed increases, to correspondingly modify the said adjusted tension in the strip to cause it to be optionally substantially a constant tension or a decreasing tension or an increasing tension as the diameter of the wound material on the drum increases.

17. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator, and an electric motor, and an interconnecting circuit by which current from the generator drives the motor; a first differential gearing comprising two rotary power output elements and a rotary power input element and transmission means arranged to transmit power to the input element at substantially constant speed from a continuously running power supplying motor, and one output element connected to the electric generator to drive it; a second differential gearing comprising two rotary power output elements, and a rotary power input element, the power input element connected to the electric motor to be driven thereby, means constraining an output element to run at substantially constant speed; respective field windings for the generator and motor and circuit means for energizing them at selected values; and the other output elements of the two gearings being respectively connected to a winding drum to drive it in the winding direction by connections that constain them to rotate always at speeds commensurable with that of the drum; and the output elements of the differential gearings to which said drum connections are made being preselected to cause the speed of the generator to increase and the speed of the motor to decrease upon a decrease of speed of the drum.

18. In an apparatus for driving a strip material winding drum or like load; an electric generator and an electric motor and interconnecting circuit means between them by which the motor is driven by generator current; a first differential gearing comprising a power input spider element rotatably supporting a pinion, and two output differential gears meshed with the pinion, and transmission means arranged to transmit power to the spider element from a continuously running power supply motor to drive it at substantially constant speed and one output differential gear connected to the generator to drive it; a second differential gearing comprising a spider element rotatably supporting a pinion and two output differential gears meshed with the pinion, and the spider element being connected to the electric motor to be driven thereby, and means constraining one output differential gear to run at substantially constant speed; respective field windings for the electric motor and generator and circuit means for energizing them at selected values; the other two output differential gears of the two gearings adapted to be connected respectively to a winding drum by connections through which they both drive the drum in the winding direction and which maintains predetermined speed ratios between them respecthe first gearing and one differential gear of the second gearing interconnected to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio and adapted to be connected to a continuously running power supplying motor; one differential gear of the first gearing connected to the generator to drive it; the electric motor being electrically connected to the generator to be electrically driven by its current output; the spider element of the second gearing being connected to the motor to be driven by it; connection means at the other difierential gears of both gearings adapting them to be connected to the load to drive it jointly; and to each be constrained to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio with the load, at all speeds of the load, the said interconnection causing the speed of the generator to increase and the speed of the motor to decrease as the speed of the load decreases.

20. A power transmission adapted to receive power from a power motor and apply torque to a rotary load to drive it; the transmission constructed to be responsive to slowing down of the load to automatically increase the load-applied torque and vice versa; the construction of the transmission comprising two differential gearings, one differential gearing comprising a rotary spider element adapted to receive power from the power motor, and rotatably supporting a pinion meshed with two differential gears, and one differential gear connected to an electric generator to drive it and the other difierential gear connected to the load to apply driving torque thereto; the generator having a load circuit; the other differential gearing comprising a rotary spider element rotatably supporting a pinion meshed with two difierential gears and one differential gear adapted to receive power from the power motor, and the other differential gear connected to the load to apply driving torque thereto, and the spider element connected to an electric motor, driven electrically by current in the generator load circuit; the spider element and dilferential gear that as aforesaid receive power from the power motor being interconnected to constrain them to rotate at a predetermined speed ratio.

21. In a winding apparatus for winding strip material in a coil on a winding drum supplied to the drum at constant linear speed; a power transmission adapted to receive power from a power motor and apply torque to the drum to drive it; the transmission constructed to respond to the slowing down of the drum due to increasing diameter of the coil as winding goes on, to increase the torque applied to the drum to maintain tension in the strip at a desired value; said construction of the transmission comprising: two differential gearings, one differential gearing comprising a rotary spider element adapted to receive power from the power motor, and rotatably supporting a pinion meshed with two differential gears, and one difierential gear connected to an electric generator to drive it and the other diiferential gear connected to the drum to apply driving torque thereto; the generator having a load circuit; the other difierential gearing comprising a rotary spider element rotatably supporting a pinion meshed with two differential :19 gears and one differential gear adapted to receive power from the power motor, and the other differential gear connected vto the drum to apply driving torque thereto, and the spider element connected to an electric motor, driven electrically by current in the generator load circuit;

LEV A. TROFIMOV.

References Cited in the file :of :this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2737354 *Nov 29, 1951Mar 6, 1956Fairchild Engine & AirplaneStrip material winder
US2808737 *Apr 1, 1952Oct 8, 1957Bullard CoVariable-speed transmission and method of operation
US2843882 *Jun 8, 1955Jul 22, 1958Us Rubber CoEvener
US2930084 *Oct 28, 1955Mar 29, 1960Bates Mfg CoApparatus for corrective drafting of strands of discontinuous fibers
US2985397 *Feb 21, 1956May 23, 1961Eugene UngerApparatus for reeling fabrics
US3085448 *Dec 29, 1961Apr 16, 1963Rice Barton CorpControlled differential drive
US3162793 *Jun 29, 1961Dec 22, 1964Mason George SPlural motor externally geared elevator drive with load sharing and friction braking
US3635415 *Sep 8, 1969Jan 18, 1972Black Clawson CoWinding apparatus
US3666196 *Apr 17, 1970May 30, 1972Schloemann AgSystem for controlling the coiling of elongated material on a coiler
US3977621 *May 4, 1973Aug 31, 1976The Hamilton Tool CompanyDifferential driven rewinder-unwinder
US7064524 *Sep 8, 2004Jun 20, 2006Honeywell International Inc.Method and apparatus for generator control
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/414.1, 475/151, 242/415, 318/8
International ClassificationB65H59/38, B65H59/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H59/385, B65H59/38
European ClassificationB65H59/38C2, B65H59/38