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Publication numberUS2650630 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 1, 1953
Filing dateNov 4, 1947
Priority dateNov 4, 1947
Publication numberUS 2650630 A, US 2650630A, US-A-2650630, US2650630 A, US2650630A
InventorsCaroline Mytinger
Original AssigneeCaroline Mytinger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compartmented container
US 2650630 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 1, 1953 c. MYTINGER COMPARTMENTED CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 4. 1947 INVENTOR.

Gama' BY 2430M arrow 1:

?atentecl Sept. 1, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 3 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in com partmented containers with particular reference to those designed for reception of the items which a woman customarily carries in her handbag, although not, of course, limited thereto.

As is well known, the average woman carries a number of items regularly in her handbag and since she switches from one bag to another with costume changes, it is necessary to transfer items from one bag to another. This is a nuisance and not only that, but frequently a needed item, such as a lip-stick or keys will be overlooked when a transfer is made.

It is, therefore, a primary object of my present invention to provide a compartmented container in which regularly needed handbag contained items may be kept in orderly fashion so as to be readily available when needed, the container being of such size and configuration as to be readily receivable in diiferent sized handbags.

Additionally, the invention contemplates a device for the purpose specified which while primarily intended as an insert for a womans handbag, may be readily carried alone, the nature of the device being such that it will present an attractive appearance.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a compartmented container which will maintain its shape without necessitating its being made of ultra stiff material, such as would make for discomfort to the arm or side when carried, it being well known that the average woman customarily carries her handbag under her arm.

It is a further aim of the invention to provide a compartmented container for regularly used handbag items which when inserted in a handbag of even minimum size will leave a space at one or both ends of the bag so as to provide, in effect, one or more compartments therein aside from compartments provided in the compartmented unit, per se. This latter is of considerable advantage as it enables the woman to keep in orderly fashion items not in the compartmented container and thus reduce to a minimum the churning of or fumbling through contents of the bag in search for a particular item.

The invention also resides in certain novel features of construction, combination and arrangement of the various parts, particularly as to unitcarrying formations and especially those associated with a closure for assisting in maintaining the shape of a container when it is closed, whereby the container may be made of relatively flexible material and still maintain its shape.

In accordance with the requirements of the patent statutes, the now preferred example of the invention has been illustrated in the accompanying drawings. However, it should be distinctly understood that the inventive concept is susceptible of many other mechanical expressions within the spirit and scope of the subject matter claimed hereinafter.

In the drawings, wherein the same reference characters have been used to designate the same parts throughout the several views:

Fig. i is a perspective view of a compartmented container embodying my invention and which, for example, may be inserted in a womans handbag or carried alone in lieu of a handbag;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the device showing it opened to expose the item holders and item receiving compartments;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fi 1;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a handbag, the container embodying my invention being shown therein in broken lines; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. l.

Referring to the drawings by reference char acters, the compartmented container 52 therein fllustrated is of rectangular form, although it may be otherwise shaped and has the end walls 6, front wall 7, rear wall 8, and bottom wall 5.

The front wall or the main portion thereof is illustrated as terminating at the fold line l0 which. is closer to the bottom 5 than it is to the top. The front wall i has an extension 9, in the form of a rectangular flap, which is adapted to fold down, as illustrated in Fig. 2, to afiord ready access to the interior of the container.

Fig. 2 also illustrates the front wall 1 as having minor extensions la at its ends only and extending the full height of the container. These front wall extensions la not only provide reinforcement for the container adjacent each end, but also provide the front walls for end compartments Hi, I5, which will be dealt with later. The front wall extensions la may be and preferably are formed from a separate sheet from front wall 7. In such case they will be adhesively or otherwise secured to the overlapping ends of front wall I.

Fig. 3 shows that the front wall extension flap 9 is of three ply formation and the rear wall 0 is of two-ply formation. In respect to the front wall flap 9, this provides a bill compartment 38, while at the rear of the container its outer wall ply is separated from the inner-ply I2, to provide an envelope-like slot [3 running the full length of the back of the container for receiving 3 a passport, letters or the like. The inner rear wall ply I2 has the flap extension I2a adapted to extend approximately half way to the line of the front wall I, la. Similarly, the rectangular front wall flap Q has an inwardly foldable closure flap 9a extending approximately half way toward the rear Wall 8 and having its edge adapted to lie flush with the free edge of the rear wall flap I2a.

The closure flaps I2a, 9a, therefore, when turned inwardly cover the open top of the container and close the upper ends of the end compartments I4 and I5 heretofore referred to.

Figs. 1, 2 and 3 show the outer surface of the front wall flap 9 as having secured thereto a sheet to providing a pocket 90: for sunglasses or the like.

The end compartment I5 is adapted to receive a package of cigarettes while the compartment it at the other end is particularly designed to hold a key purse or the like. In each instance, the end compartments I4, I5 are provided by a transverse partition or wall I6. running the full height and width of the container. These walls IE are secured to the minor front wall portions Ia L and to the inner rear wall ply I2 in any preferred manner.

In order to afford ready access to the. compartments I4, I5, the walls It are V out at their upper ends, as indicated at I611, 50 as to provide finger notches or recesses.

Spaced inwardly from the front wall 1, la of the container is the longitudinally extending partition I9 which has secured thereto below its upper end the partition I8 so as. to provide a narrow comb receiving compartment 28 therebetween. The space between partition I9 and the front wall portion 7 below the fold line II) of the front wall flap 9 is adapted to receive reading glasses, or some such item, this compartment or space being indicated by reference character 2|.

The comb compartment-defining partitions I8, is may be of flexible material formed in a loop and flattened out with the bight portions at their ends cemented or otherwise secured to the adjacent portion of the end partitions I6.

Spaced inwardly of the rear comb compartment-defining partition I 9, is a third partition 22 running the full length of the space between the walls I8. The partition 22 may be conveniently secured at its ends to the transverse partitions 56 by reverting said ends as indicated at 22a and cementin or otherwise securing the same to the adjacent portions of the transverse partitions I6.

In the illustrated example of the invention, two cross partitions 23 disposed in spaced relationship to one another between the longitudinally extending partitions 22, I9 provide a small lip-stick receiving compartment 24, and on one side thereof a compartment 25 of rather considerable length which may receive items such as cards, ash box, mascara, or the like.

Adjacent the remote cross-partition 23 of the lip-stick compartment 24, there is defined between the partitions I9, 22, a compartment 26 for the reception of matches, cigarette lighter, or

the like, the opposite end of this compartment 26,

being defined, of course, by the adjacent partition Iii, which in the illustrated instance is the inner wall of the cigarette compartment I5.

Rearwardly of the longitudinal partition 22v and between the same and the rear wall' ply I2 is another longitudinal partition 2'! runningv the full length of the space. between cross partitions I6, and having its inturned ends 21a. secured to cross partitions I6. This partition 21 provides an elongated compartment 28 at its forward side for the reception of a check-book, note book or the like, while between said partition 21 and the inner rear wall portion I2 is another long compartment 23, which may be conveniently used for the reception of a vanity case, powder box, or some other item.

Previous mention has been made of the fact that the container may be carried; independently of a hang-bag, if desired. In carrying out this phase of the invention, I provide each of the end Walls with co-extensive integral bearing loops 30 for receiving the bearing pin am of a strap carrying eye 3 I. A shoulder strap 32 is adapted to have its l'ooped terminals secured to said eyes so that the container can be conveniently carried suspended from the shoulder in the manner popularized by the Woman's Auxiliary Services of the Armed Forces.

Turning now to Fig. 2, it Will be noted that the inner surface of the rear wall closure extension flap I 2a provides the elongated pencil receiving loop 34 adjacent its free edge; and inwardly thereof, the similar elongated loop 33 which may be conveniently availed of for the reception of a cigarette holder,. or some similar item.

Similarly, the free edge of the companion closure flap 90. has adjacent itsv free edge an elongated loop 35 which is. intended to receive a. fountain pen. or analogous article.

Although. any form of closure fastener may be availed of, I havev illustrated in the drawings a variety of friction fastener which takes the form of spaced tongues. 36 extending outwardly beyond the free edge of the front closure flap 9a, to be frictionally received in U-shaped keepers 31, carried by the companion closure flap I2a. The flaps I2a, 9a, may, of course overlap, but for appearance sake, I prefer that the free edges of the closure flaps. I2a, 9a, lie in flush engagement when closed.

The rectangular flap. or front wall extension 9 has previously been referred to as of three-ply construction, and the inner ply 9bhas a longitudinal split adapted to be closed by a conventional zipper 39, so as to provide access to the bill compartment 36', which is defined between the plys of said flap 9. By providing the bill compartment in the rectangular front wall provided flap 9, the user may have ready access to her currency without fumbling about in any of the inner compartments of the device.

Similarly, convenient access may be had to change because a. change purse 4c is also associated with the outwardly swingable front wall flap 9, as indicatcdat 40.

The change purse 40 will preferably be of fabric or other flexible material as iscustomary, and the inner portion of the change purse may be disposed in the forward part of what has been referred to. asthe eye-glass compartment 2!, which is locatedinwardly of the front wall I. The change purse 40 may be secured to. the inner surface of. the front wall 1 in any preferred manner and the mouth of the change purse is defined by duplicate stiffening member ii. of U- shaped form, theleg ends of which, are pivoted together, as indicated at 40a. The bight portions of the mouth-carried stiffening members 4I,. have the cooperating snaps 42 as usual for maintaining the change purse mouth closed.

When the front wall carried flap 9 is. thrown upwardly toclosed position, as shown in Fig. 1, it, will be apparent that the leg portions. of the stiffening members 4| of the purse 40 will lie flush with the inner surfaces of the transverse partitions [6 which define the fronts of the end compartments M, 5. Thus, the purse mouth defining stiffening members 4! tend to sustain the container against collapse in a longitudinal direction. This is an important feature in the event that the compartmented container is made of relatively flexible material such as leather, fabric cord or the like. Of course, the partitions i8, i9, 22, 21 also cooperate in tending to prevent longitudinal collapse of the container when made of the somewhat flexible material mentioned.

Furthermore, when the container is closed and the closure flaps 9a. 12a turned down, it will be evident that the elongated article receiving loops 33, 34 and 35, carried thereby will have at least one end engage the inner surface of the proximate cross partition l6 to thereby aid in sustaining the container against longitudinal collapse.

The strap carrying eye provided loops 3|, 31a, at the ends 6 of the container, serve to prevent transverse collapse of the same adjacent its top, so that the entry openings of the various compartments will always be accessible. This is particularly important when the container is made of leather, fabric cord or other relatively flexible material.

While on the subject of a preferred material for the device, it is believed to be apparent that material having some degree of flexibility is extremely desirable in view of the fact that a handbag is conventionally clutched as it were, between the arm and side of the user. If my compartmented container were made of wood or metal, it would be a very uncomfortable adjunct to a handbag by reason of rigidity, if not from relatively abrupt corners or ends which would dig into the flesh.

In Fig. 4 I have shown a conventional womens handbag 50 having any conventional closure 5| for an opening of sufficient length to permit the insertion therethrough of a container 52 according to the invention. Thus, a user of my container may readily transfer a container from one handbag to another and have no fear of forgetting any essential item. It is to be noted that a container 52 is intended to be shorter than the length of the interior length of a bag 50 whereby to provide spaces 53 beyond each end of the container for gloves or other accessories which normally would match the bag 50. When so positioned in a bag 50, the top closure-providing front and rear wall extensions 9a and I20 of container 52 are adapted to be opened, as shown, and held open by frictional engagement with the overlying interior wall portions of the bag 50, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 4.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A quick-change bag insert comprising a substantially rectangular body member formed of a flexible material, said body member consisting of end walls, a front wall, a rear wall and a bottom wall, transverse partitions spaced inwardly from each end of the end walls and defining compartments adjacent the end walls, said front wall having a portion thereof foldable on a line below the mid-portion of said front wall, said front wall further having minor extensions at its ends and extending the full height of the insert, the said transverse partitions connecting the rear wall and the minor extensions, a plurality of longitudinally spaced partitions extending between and affixed to the inner sides of the transverse partitions, the rear wall comprising a two-ply formation to form a pocket on said wall, said rear wall formed at its upper portion into a closure flap, said front wall comprising a three-ply formation to form pockets on the said front wall, the front wall formed at its upper portion with a closure flap, said front closure flap being provided with an article-receiving portion on its inner under surface, said portion adapted to contact the inner sides of the transverse partitions when the closure flap is moved to closed position to thereby sustain the insert against longitudinal collapse.

2. In a compartmented container primarily intended as an insert for a womans various handbags, said container being open at the top and having front, side, back and bottom wall members, the front wall being U-shaped and the legs and bight portion of said front wall defining a gap exposing the container interior, all of said walls being of relatively light flexible material, so as to yield and not bulge out or deform the handbag into which the container is inserted, a flexible transverse partition spaced inwardly from each end wall and coextensive in height with the latter, said transverse partitions connected to said back wall and to the gap defining legs of said front wall whereby to cooperate with said end walls and proximate front and back wall portions in the provision of box-form reinforcements at each end of the container, which boxform reinforcements are calculated to resist transverse collapse of the container at its ends; the combination of a gap closing flap member carried by the front wall bight and leg portions and overlapping the latter, receptacle-defining means secured to the inner face of said gap closing flap member, and terminating short of the ends thereof, said receptacle defining means having substantially rigidly connected end reinforcements which are themselves substantially rigid, and said respective end reinforcements being aligned with the opposed surfaces of the transverse partitions which are embodied in said boxform end reinforcements of the container, so as to engage said partition surfaces when the gap closing flap member is closed to resist longitudinal collapse of the container.

3. In a compartmented container primarily intended as an insert for a womans various handbags, said container being open at the top and having front, side, back and bottom wall members, the front wall being U-shaped and the legs and bight portion of said front wall defining an opened topped gap exposing the container interior, all of said walls being of relatively light flexible material, so as to yield and not bulge out or deform the handbag into which the container is inserted, a flexible transverse partition spaced inwardly from each end wall and coextensive in height with the latter, said transverse partitions connected to said back wall and to the gap defining legs of said front wall whereby to cooperate with said end walls and proximate front and back wall portions in the provision of box-form reinforcements at each end of the container, which box-form reinforcements are calculated to resist transverse collapse of the container at its ends; the combination of a gap closing flap member carried by the front wall bight and leg portions and overlapping the latter, a change purse secured to the inner face of said gap closing flap member and having its ends terminating short of the ends of said flap member,

said change: purse having invented; Uriorm mouth-defining frame members;v the; legs; 02 said. frame members. defining the; ends of. the; purse; and being aligned; with; the opposed surfaces; of the. transverse partitions which are; embodied: in said. box-form end reinforcements of the; can'- tainer, so that said frame member legs; engage References Cited in the file Of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Number Date Freund Aug. '71 1923".

Number Number 101 354,748 706,905 459,626

Name Date. Aldrsich ,Jan-. 13-, 1925 Primley: v Nov. 8,. 1927 Lewis Mar; 7, 1933 M'cNa-ry Dec; 12, 1939 Holden Mar. 15, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date. France Aug. 4, 1905 France, Apr; 4, 1931 Great Britain Jan. 12, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1464176 *Mar 24, 1922Aug 7, 1923Freund Bros & Co IncCombined hand bag and vanity box
US1522479 *Aug 3, 1923Jan 13, 1925Livingston Aldrich MargaretCovering for containers
US1648565 *Aug 25, 1924Nov 8, 1927Kathleen D PrimleyGolf-ball carrier
US1900508 *Dec 16, 1930Mar 7, 1933Lewis Florence NFitted traveling bag
US2183428 *Jan 24, 1938Dec 12, 1939Agnes H McnaryPurse kit
US2464312 *Nov 15, 1945Mar 15, 1949Belle Holden WinnieQuick-change internal structure for handbags
FR354748A * Title not available
FR706905A * Title not available
GB459626A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3454068 *Dec 22, 1967Jul 8, 1969Peerless Plastics IncCompartmentalized attache case
US4811769 *Jan 25, 1988Mar 14, 1989Phares Robert RPurse insert
US6003573 *Oct 20, 1997Dec 21, 1999Owens; JoannInterchangeable purse assembly
US6237660Nov 8, 1999May 29, 2001Mavis L. GiardinoPurse system
US6945293 *Oct 11, 2002Sep 20, 2005Terri NewtonPurse organizer
WO1980000528A1 *Sep 15, 1978Apr 3, 1980C GaudioCase pouch with multiple utilisations
Classifications
U.S. Classification150/111, 150/112, 190/112, 150/113, 150/104, 150/119
International ClassificationA45C13/00, A45C3/00, A45C13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA45C3/00, A45C13/02
European ClassificationA45C13/02