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Publication numberUS2651303 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1953
Filing dateNov 13, 1948
Priority dateNov 13, 1948
Publication numberUS 2651303 A, US 2651303A, US-A-2651303, US2651303 A, US2651303A
InventorsJohnson Richard S, Palmquist Gustav A
Original AssigneeJohnson Richard S, Palmquist Gustav A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inhaler
US 2651303 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 8, 1953 INHALER Richard S. Johnson, Racine, Wis., and Gustav A. Palmquist, Chicago, Ill.

' Application November 13, 1948, Serial No. 59,822

(Cl. 12S-203) 12 Claims.

This invention relates to a small, portable device particularly suited for the dispersion of an inhalant, such as oxygen, from a sealed cartridge lled under pressure. When used forV this purpose, the device furnishes a quick and simple way for a person to get a lift, or be physically and mentally alerted when occasion requires, by supplementing the normal oxygen content of the air.

The device preferably is in the form of a cylinder, approximately 1 in diameter and 3" long, so that it may be conveniently carried in a pocket or purse, and may be inconspicuously used. It may be made of simple screw machine and stock parts, so that its cost of manufacture is small.

Additional objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a mouth-type embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a section taken at line 2-2 of Fig. '1, but drawn to an enlarged scale;

Fig. 3 is an elevation of a nasal-type embodiment of the invention with a portion of the ca broken away; and

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken at line 4-4 of Fig. 3, but drawn to an enlarged scale.

It is contemplated that the containers for storage of the inhalant will be in the form of a cartridge 20 of the type illustrated in Fig. 2. While other forms of containers or cartridges may be used, the type illustrated is presently in general use for the storage of carbon-dioxide under pressure and, thus, is readily available for the storage of other products. In such cartridges the gas is stored under pressure and, therefore, it is possible to store a relatively large volume of gas in a limited space. The cost of each cartridge is quite inexpensive, subject, of course, to the cost of the particular inhalant.

In each embodiment of the invention it will be seen that there are substantially six basic parts: a container or cartridge, a piercing tube used in puncturing the cartridge, means to force the cartridge and the piercing tube together, an applicator, a control valve to regulate the flow of the inhalant from the cartridge to the applicator, and a mounting head for the last-mentioned four parts. While in most embodiments it will be desirable to have each of these parts or its equivalent, it may be apparent that in certain instances a particular part will perform a double duty and/or certain of the parts may be eliminated.

In Figs. l and 2 an embodiment of the invention is illustrated whereinthe inhaler is of a type for use in injecting inhalant into the mouth. The applicator is in the form of a molded rubber bit 4| adapted to be received in the mouth and clinched between the teeth. The applicator ts securely about the upper portion of mounting head 42, with projections 43 in the mounting head seating in grooves 44 in the applicator to hold the bit to the mounting head. The lower portion of mounting head 42 is threaded, as illustrated at 26, to receive a hollow, threaded cap .21. The internal opening of cap 21 is of a size just suicient to receive cartridge 20. A cartridge piercing tube 28 is secured to and projects from mounting head 42. The projecting portion of tube 28 is surrounded by a rubber gasket 29. Opening 3l in gasket 29 is of slightly smaller diameter than that of neck 32 in cartridge 20, and the lower end of gasket 29 projects somewhat below the lower end of piercing tube 28.

An internal passage 46 communicates between the piercing tube 28 and an internal opening 41 in. the applicator. Passage V46 is shaped and threaded tolreceive a valve 48, which valve is of thetype commonly used in the valve stems of inner tubes of automobile or other tires. Such a valve is spring-loaded so as to hold it in a normally closed position and is opened by pressure applied to valve stem 49.

A portion of internal opening 41 in the bit is of enlarged dimensions, as illustrated at 5|, and within the enlarged portion 5I is received a hard, spherical member, or ball, 52 of slightly smaller dimensions than that of the enlarged portion of opening 41. Ball 52 is used as a pressure member to force projecting valve stem 49 inwardly to open valve 48.

In the operation of the embodiment of Figs. 1 and 2 the cartridge 20 is placed in communication with passage 46 in the manner previously described. Valve 48, being normally closed, prevents the flow of inhalant to opening 41 in the applicator. Bit 4I is placed in the mouth with the teeth gripping neck 53 of the bit. By applying pressure with the teeth to neck 53 the upper and loWer faces of the bit at neck 53 are displaced towards each other, with the result that ball 52 is forced against valve stem 49 with sufficient pressure to open Valve 48 and allow the inhalant to flow through passage 46 into opening 41. The enlarged portion 5I of passage 41 is of sufficient Width that the inhalant may flow around the sides of ball 52 and out through passage 47, even though the portion of the passage above and below ball 52 is obstructed by the contact of thc-'bit against the ball. From passage 41 the inhalant may be drawn into the lungs through the mouth and trachea.

In the embodiment of Figs. 3 and 4 the applicator is in the form of a nose piece 56 adapted to be brought in contact with, or inserted within, a single nostril. The'internal opening of nose piece S isl adapted to fit somewhat looseiyover the upper projecting end 51 of mounting head 58. A retaining ring 59 is seated in groove 50 or nose piece 56 and elongated groove 6| of mount.-r ing head 58. The retaining ring allows the nose piece 5B to be moved to a limited"i extent. along upper end 51 of the mounting head, andyetrpre` vents the nose piece from beinglremovedifrom: the mounting head under normal conditions of use.

A shoulder S3 is formed at the juncture of projecting end 5'1 vwith the. main partici. mounting head 58. Between shoulder lil-tand tl'ielowei'; face? 64' of nosevv piece. 56 isf a soit rubber gasket i551y Gasket 65 servesthe.-` two-fold purpose off preventing the seepage of inhalantfrom between nose piece 564 andprojecting end i'offthe mount ing head' and biasing'the inose piece upwardly 'to thefglimit allowed by retainingring 5B.

Withinmountinghead- 58.y is an internal passageG'I; a portionio which is shaped and thread.er ed to' receivevalve 48, with valve" stemVV 49fprojecting': beyond the upper end of the l projecting. portion 51 of' thev mountinghea'd'. Within in' ternal opening 58 ofnose piecei5i6fisa disc-like pressure member:` 69 having.' openingsc 10. therethrough; Witli nose piece 5&heldlbyfgaskei: 6.5 inthe position"Y shown irrFig. .4', pressure member SBiszjustfout of contactlwith valve' steiny 49ste allow the valve zto. remain .inil the-:closed position;

Withza f charged'cartridgeltfbrouglitinto `conrmunication with passage: 61, the inhalen` is brought up to the nose with opening 68 incommunication with one: nostril. A seriesfofi steps or ridges' T2 on the; outer vedge of" theA nose piece permit the nose piece tobe. grasped and moved toward'mounting head. 58'Y of the-:inhalen Dur4 ing this movement pressuremember" 68': forces valve stem' 49"' downwardly, openingfvalve f 481-. and; allowing the inhalant to flow-'through' passage 61 andi opening- 58 into; the-nostril; With the inhaler grasped in one hand-iti is-asiinpleg matter. to liookitheA nail' oft the thumbfintoone--of the steps '|'2'y to"` move: the'` noseipiece. When: it is desired to" interrupt the' iiow' ofi inhalantthe nosefpiecef is released and the/springs action oi gasket 55r forces-tthe nose piecexoutwardly; allowing.' valve lll to ciose.

The userY will-often: desire -to carry theinhaler in a pocket or purse, and forthispurpose a cap i3 may be usedlto-prevent contamination of: the nosepiece: The cap slips down over a portion offA mounting head 5&1:L and isfrictionally held thereonv by aspring: retainerfring M seatedin a groove inthe body: A- similar cap Vwouldbeused with the'embodiment.illustrated in'Figs'. land-2. However, no. retainer ring. isneeded in thisv case', resilient bit 4i providing-sufcient friction to` hold the cap in place.

Various'modic'ations, without departing from the=scope ofthe invention, will'be apparent. For instance,I piercing tube 2%, instead of being formedwith an aXial bore, may be asolidf tube havinga` groove along one side thereof to-permit theinhalant. to iiow from thefcartridge-linto the passage. The choice of particular embodiments of the invention for specific illustration and description is merely a compliance with section 4888 of the Revised Statutes, and should not be construed as imposing unnecessary limitations on the appended claims.

From the foregoing discussion it will be apparent that the inhalers are an ultimate of simplicity, both from a standpoint of manufacture and use. The mounting Ahead for the four. otherrbasic parts, inA addition to the cartridge, canbe made in an elementary screw machine operation. A simple tire valve, readily obtainable, may be used to control the ow of inhalant if the producer prefers not to construct the valves in his own plant.. 'lilfiel remaining parts may be made by employing one or more of a number of fundamental .forming.operations, the selection depending upon the facilities of a particular manufacturer andthe materials employed in the fabrication. The assemblage and use of the inhalers is such: that no greaty amount of thought is required.

Thepossibilitiesas to choice of inhalants-a-re: numerous and' varied. Inhalants form are an obvious choice, but liquids or powders.l

with-a compressedgas as an ejecting mediumy maybe employed.- Through the'use of mate-- rials'in liquid orpowder form, the scoper of ap plication of our invention may be expanded well;

beyond the realm ofinhalants.

We claim: l. In a device inwhich iiuidfrom-.a cartridge in which the iiuid' is sealedA underpressure-isfA introduced into av body orice communicating: with theftrachea; including. the combination' of: a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a cartridge-piercingtubey attached toV thev head and communicating with and projecting', from: one endoi saiolfpassage,` means-to force. said tube into said cartridge, a. normally closed'valve within the passage adjacent; the otherY end thereof; said-.valve having a valve stemV movable in adirection longitudinally of; the passage toopen the; valve; an; applicator about at least` the portion ofthe head'adjaoent to said. other end ofy the passage and movable with respect to-said. head, said applicator being adapted-tofbeinserted'in said oriiice-and having aniopening therethrough; communicating between said passage and the portion of the applicator-inserted inthe orifice, and` a pressure member" within the openingtci contacty and move the: valvezstem to openl the valve upon movement of' the. said; applicator'. by: a body'member.

2. Ina device inwhich. fluidy from a cartridge;-

inwhich the-fluid is sealed under pressure-is inf troduced-into. -a body orifice communicatingwitir the trachea, including theV combination ofa mounting headhaving a passage therethrough, ay cartridge-piercing tube'attached to the'. head andcommunicatingwith and projecting from. one end 'of' said passagameans to force said tube into said-cartridge, a normally closed'valve'within the-other end ofthe passage, said valveshaving avalve stem-movable in a direction longitudinal,- ly-ofthe'passage to open the valve; anv applicator; a: part off whichl is resilient, about at leastthe portion of the head adjacent to saidother-end of the passage, said applicatorbeing adapted-to be inserted in said oriiice and having an opening therethrough' communicating between said' pas.- sageand the portion of the applicator inserted inthe orifice, a pressure member within the opening. and adjacent to saidvalve stem, said resilient part of the applicator allowing at least in gaseous:

a portion of the applicator to be moved to press 'said pressure member against the valve stem to move the latterv and open the valve. 3. In a device in which fluid from a cartridge in Which the fluid isl sealedunder pressure is vintroduced into a body orice communicating With the trachea, including the combination of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a cartridge-piercing tube attached to the head and communicating with land projecting from one end of said passage, means to force said tube into said cartridge, anormally closed valve Within the other en d of the passage, said valve having a valve stem;v movable in a direction longitudinally of the passage to open the valve, an applicator, a part of which is resilient, about at least the' portion of the head adjacent to said other vend of the passage, said applicator being adapted to be inserted in said orice and having an opening therethrough communicating between said passage and the portion of the applicator inserted in the orice, a pressure member within the opening and adjacent to said valve stem, said resilient part of theapplicator allowing at least a portion of the applicator to be moved to press said `pressure member against the valve stem to move the latter and open the valve, said resilient means also serving as a seal between said applicator and said head.

within the passage, said'valve having an axially movable valve stem to open the valve, and means within the bit to open the valve in response to pressure exerted on portions of the bit, said bit including a pressure member in the said opening to open the valve in response to a displacement of a portion of the bit.

5. In a device in which fluid from a cartridge in which the fluid is sealed under pressure is introduced into the mouth, the combination of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a, cartridge piercing tube, means to force said tube into said cartridge, means at one end of the passage for placing the cartridge in communication with the passage, a valve within the passage, said valve being normally closed and having an axially movable valve stern to open the valve, a bit attached to the head adjacent the other end of the passage and having an opening therein between the end of the bit and the other end of the passage, a ball within said opening, said bit being a resilient material whereby by biting on the bit the ball may be forced against the valve stem to move the stem and open the valve.

6. In a device in which fluid from a cartridge in which the iiuid is sealed under pressure is introduced into the mouth, the combination of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a cartridge piercing tube, means to force said tube into said cartridge, means at one end of the passage for placing the cartridge in communication with the passage, a valve Within the passage, said valve being normally closed and having an axially movable valve stem to open the valve, a bit attached to said head adjacent the other end of said passage, said bit having' an opening therein communicating between the end of the bit and the other end of the passage, the portion of said opening adjacent said passage being of` greater dimension than .the remainder of the opening, and a ball of such dimension as to be received within the larger portion of said opening but too large to be received within the smaller portion of said opening, said bit being a resilient material whereby by biting on the bit the ball may be forced into engagement with the valve stem to move the .latter and open the valve. f I

7. In a device in which iiuid from a cartridge in which the fluid is sealed under pressurev is introduced into the mouth', the combination of.a mounting head having a passage substantially axially therethrough, a cartridge-piercingtube attached to the head and communicating 'with and projecting vfrom one end of said passage, means to force the tube into the cartridge, 'fa normally closed valve within the passage adjacent the other end thereof, said valve having av valve stem movable in a direction parallel to said axis, said stem projecting beyond said other end of the passage, a bit attached to said headadjacentthe other end of said passage, said bit having" an opening therein communicating between the end of the bit and said other end of the passagefthe portion of said opening adjacent said passage being of greater dimension than the remainder of the opening, and a ball of'suchv dimension as 'to be received within the larger portion'of-ssaid opening but too large to be received withinthe smallerportion of said opening, said bit bein'ga resilient material whereby by biting on the bit the ball may be forced into engagementwith the valve stem to move the latter and open the valve.

8. In a device for introducing intothegnose fluid from a cartridge in which the'fluid issealed under pressure, the combination of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a cartridgepiercing tube attached to the head adjacent one end of the passage and in communication therewith, means to force the tube into a cartridge, a nose piece movably attached to the head adjacent the other end of the passage and having an opening therethrough communicating between said passage and the end of the nose piece, a normally closed valve within the passage, said valve having an axially movable valve stem to open the valve, and a pressure member adapted to open the valve in response to movement of the nose piece.

9. In a device for introducing into the nose fluid from a cartridge in which the uid is sealed under pressure, the combination of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, a cartridge piercing tube, means to force said tube into said cartridge, means at one end of the passage for placing a cartridge in communication therewith, the portion of the head adjacent the other end of the passage being of annular configuration of smaller cross-sectional dimension than that of the remainder of the head, a resilient gasket surrounding a part of said annular portion and seating against the remainder of the head, a nose piece surrounding an additional part of said annular portion and having an opening therethrough to provide communication between said passage and the end of the nose piece, said nose piece being free to move at least to a limited extent with respect to said annular portion, a norassu-.eos

axially naive within'iihe gpassage, .said value Fhavmgamiaxiallymovable valve `stem ato open Ythe walue, and means mithin :the nose piece ladapted fopen theivalvefas :the nose piece .is moved toawarsd :said u'emainder 1of vthe -head, .said resilient mgasket being sadapted to Vact both as :a .seal to prevent the-leakagefofluidbetween the annular portion and .the :nose piece Vand as Aa spring to normally position fthe nose .piece away from said remainder :of the head thereby rendering the atsLve-fopening aneans ,normally iinefectiue.

. FH). In a :device for .introducing Yinto the -nose L-uid romsa cartridge dn .which .the iuid is .sealed :under -pressure, the `combination .of a mounting head having a passage therethrough, va cartridge miercng tube, imeans -to `force said tube .into said cartridge 'fa portion fof `said head vbeing .of reiduced .annular -.conguration thereby forming .a sshoulder, ia :nose piece received `over .said -reduced .annular ;portion.and adapted to move with re- :spect thereto, means lfor restricting -the :move- .mentmf the nose-piece -w-ith respect .to =the head, sa moi-'mally '.closed'valve Within fsaid passage .and .havinjg ia valve -stem projecting Itherefrom, :said "valve .stem vbeing .axially lmovable `to open A.the Naive, :a f-pressure iplate Y.within :the nose piece zadapted =to :contact said -valve stern and open the waive zas the nose piece is moved `towards .said :shoulder: resilient gasket -means between .said nose piece `and said shoulder, .said .gasket imeans being .of.su1cient thickness to normally position .said l-pressure :plate Afaway from the position .in which -said .valve Iis vopened, said nose `piece and pressure @late having openings .therethrough -to pro-vide communication fbetween said .passage :and `dille fendsof rthe nose ;piece, vand means r at .the futher -end of :the passage `for placing za Icartridge iin communication Lwith the ,-passage.

11. nfafdeviceiin whichfiiuid from la'carizridge which .the jud is :sealed runder pressure .fisjin- Ftmiuced :into the body orice communicating y:with the'trachea, rthe @combination-of fascartri'dge- '.piercingtube aimounting head having apassage therein communicating ,withssaid itube, means t0 :force Y:the '.tubeiinto :the cartridge, a iva-ive .wit-hm said passage, :said valve having an .axialeVI mov-- able l:valve stem to open -the valve, .an applicator having an opening itherein communicating lwith :said `1.1a-ssage l.and constructed to be vfpl-aced Ain communication with .said orice, .the applicator including `a pressure member .constituting .a part of the applicator and constructed :to .contact .and -move said .valve stem to open :the Malve `by pres- ;sure from the body member.

T12. :In .a -deviee -in which :.fluid ,from .a xcartridge in which the .fluid isisealed .undenpressureisin- .troduced into the body `.orifice communicating with .the trachea, the combinationof :a cartridgepiercing tube, a mounting head having a ,pas-

sage vtherein communicating .with said tube, -means to force the tube `into vthe cartridge., a valve Within `said passage, .said .valve .having Lan axially movable valve .stem .toppen the Malve, .an .applicator .having .an .opening .therein .communicating with said passage and constructed 'to `.'b.e placed in .communication -With said orifice, said :applicator including a resilient portion and a pressure member, said .resilient .portion `being .adapted .to permit .a .force to .be applied to the pressure .memberlby ta .body member .to move 'the pressuremember .against Qthe `valve .Stem .in .a direction longitudinally of .said .stem to .open 'the Valve .after the yopening'has .been .placed 'in communication with 'the orifice.

RICHARD S.'.`J.GHNS.O.N. .GUSTAY A. PIIMQUIST.

References Cited lin `the Yile of *this patent UNITED -SIATES .PATENTS fNurnber Name Date 662,658 Sterne '.Nov. 27, 1900 .FOREIGN PATENTS 'Number KA.Country Date 107,990 GreatBritain 4.July 26 191V! 494,1?73 Great Britain -Oct...21.l938

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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/205.21, 222/5, 128/205.24
International ClassificationA61M15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2205/8225, A61M15/00, A61M2202/0208
European ClassificationA61M15/00