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Publication numberUS2651380 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1953
Filing dateOct 27, 1949
Publication numberUS 2651380 A, US 2651380A, US-A-2651380, US2651380 A, US2651380A
InventorsJulius Brandenburg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stethoscope with means for regu
US 2651380 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 1953 J. BRANDENBURG 2,651,380

STETHOSCOPE WITH MEANS FOR REGULATING THE TONE AND PITCH Filed on. 27, 1949 FIG.2. FIG.3.

INVENTOR JUL/U5 BPANDENBUQG Patented Sept. 8, 1953 OFFICE STETHOSCOPE WITH LATIN G THE TO MEANS FOR REGU- NE AND PITCH Julius Brandenburg, New York, N. Y. Application October 27, 1949, Serial No. 123,921

1 Claim.

This invention relates to improv ments in stethoscopes.

Broadly, it is an object of the invention to provide a stethoscope in which the tone of the instrument can be regulated and set at a desired tone or pitch,

More particularly, it is an object of the inven--,

tion to provide a stethoscope that will give a stronger and clearer tone and which is more sensitive to sound.

A further object of the invention is to provid a simple means of regulating the tone and pitch of a stethoscope to that desired by the doctor using it. Such pitch or tone can be varied as desired when sounding different parts of the body, such as the heart, lungs, etc.

Still a further object is to provide a covering or disk for the portion of the stethoscope which would normally contact the skin and which is cheap enough so that such covering or disk can be discarded after each use to provide a hygienic and sanitary stethoscope. Furthermore, such a covering, if made of Celluloid or plastic will not be as cold to the body as metal and will help to increase the resonance of the instrument.

A further object of the invention is to provide a stethoscope with the above advantages which can be used upon a patient who is lying down and cannot sit up.

Another object is to provide a stethoscope which can be used in duplicate upon a double tube type of instrument so that each stethoscope can be regulated or adjusted to compensate for the difierence in hearing ability of each ear and which can thus be used to compare sounds of different parts of the body simultaneously, such as the two lungs, or the two cardiac valves.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference is had to the following detailed description in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical cross sectional view of the stethoscope with the lower portion of the central member partly broken away.

Fig. 2 is a bottom view showing the sound receiving chamber.

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross sectional view of a hygienic cover for the stethoscope.

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross sectional view of a hygienic flanged disk for the stethoscope.

Fig. 5 is a vertical cross sectional view of an auxiliary stethoscope unit with the lower portion of the central member partly broken away and showing the main transmitter head in dotted lines.

Fig. 6 is a vertical cross sectional view of a modified right angle stethoscope for patients that cannot sit up showing the right angle horizontal member partly broken away and showing the key to turn the externally threaded member which varies the size of the sound receiving chamber.

Fig. 7 is a vertical cross sectional view of a modified right angle stethoscope with an external set screw for fixing the position of the central member.

Fig. 8 is a vertical cross sectional view of another modified stethoscope of the bell shape type.

Referring to the drawings, numeral l0 represents a stethoscope transmitter head has a central internally threaded opening I I. The circular base It is solid and slopes inwardly toward the opening ll providing a sound receiving chamber. The solid base will not distort the tone as would a hollow one. A central member I3 externally threaded at one end is adapted to coact with the internal threads of opening II so that the central member l3 can be adjusted higher or lower as shown by the dot-dash line [3 so that the size of the sound receiving chamber, which comprises the hollow of the inwardly sloping base I2 and the lower portion of threaded central opening I I can be varied which in turn eiiects the tone or pitch of the stethoscope. The central member 4 3 a longitudinal opening or bore M therethrough to permit the sound to travel from the sound receiving chamber through the bore [4 and. thence through the rubber tubing (not shown) which is well known in the field of stethoscopes. The upper end of the central member 13 is curved inwardly, as shown at [5, to receive the endof the rubber tubing (not shown). A nut 16, internally threaded, is adapted to coact with the external threads of the central member t3 to fix the position of the central member l3 at the desired point. The base 2 can be made of metal or plastic, such as Catalin, Bakelite or similar plastics.

Since the ears of diiferent persons vary in sensitivity, the doctor can adjust the sound receiving chamber by regulating and setting the central member l3 so that a strong pure tone is obtained, excluding partial tones or overtones. If the central member I3 is retracted so that the sound receiving chamber is larger, the tone becomes louder and the pitch is somewhat softened. As the doctor gets older his hearing varies and he can then adjust the size of the sound receiving chamber from time to time to obtain a stronger and purer tone as desired by the individual doctor. Sometimes a doctor may desire to vary the pitch or tone in order to better hear the beat of a heart or lung. In some instances two Stethoscopes can be used simultaneously by the use of two rubber tubes, such as when listening to two lungs or two cardiac valves to obtain an instantaneous comparison. The difierent stethoscopes can also be easily regulated or adjusted to compensate for the difference in hearing of each ear of a person.

The sloping walls of the base l2 may be straight or curved, as desired.

Since a stethoscope is generally used on sick persons it is important to have a sanitary or hygienic device so that germs or microbes are not carried from one person to another. I have. therefore, provided a thin cover ll, preferably made of Celluloid, vinyl or other similar material to fit upon the end of the base l2 by frictional engagement, that is, the circular flange is is adapted to be seated upon the end of base 52 and to cover the sound receiving chamber, as shown in Fig. 3. When the cover ll is used with the stethoscope it acts as a resonance plate and will give a slightly louder tone or pitch to the sound being received. In Fig. 4 I have shown a modification of the cover shown in Fig. 3, which comprises a circular upright flange and a short flange as at right angles to flange lie leaving the central portion entirely open. The flanged disk shown in Fig. 4 is adapted to be seated upon the base i2 by frictional engagement. Both the thin cover shown in Fig. 3 and the flanged disk shown in Fig. are very inexpensive so that such disk or cover would be discarded after each use. An additional advantage is that such a disk or cover will be more sympathetic and not as cold to the body as metal or some types of plastics.

In Fig. 5,1 have shown an auxiliary stethoscope unit which is adapted to be used with a larger unit, such as shown in Figs. 1, 6 and 7. Very often a doctor wants to sound portions of the body, such as between the ribs. The larger stethoscope will not make as good contact as the smaller unit. The doctor can readily attach the auxiliary unit to the larger stethoscope as shown in Fig. 5. The auxiliary unit comprises a transmitter head 2 l, which may be made of solid metal or plastic and which is circular in form. The auxiliary unit has a sound receiving chamber 22 in its base, the walls of which are arcuate. However, such walls may be sloped inwardly toward a central internally threaded opening within which there is a central externally threaded member 23 which is threaded throughout its entire length. An internally threaded nut 26 is adapted to be seated upon the central member 23 in order to fix the position of the central member with relation to the transmitter head 2 l. By turning the central member upward or downward with relation to the head ill, the volume of the sound receiving chamber 22 is varied thus changing the pitch of any sound that may travel into the sound receiving chamber. The central member 23 has a central longitudinal bore 25 therethrough so that sound from the chamber 222 will pass through the bore The thread of member 23 coacts with the internally threaded opening 9 l of the stethoscope shown in Fig. l and in dotted lines on Fig. 5.

In the modification oi the stethoscope shown in Fig. 6 a modification is shown for use upon patients who cannot readily sit up and it is more convenient for the doctor to use a right angle stethoscope such as is shown in this figure. This stethoscope comprises a transmitter head 26 which has a central inte nally threaded opening within which there is seated a hollow member 2? having a shoulder 28 which acts as a stop against the top of the base 2c. The bottom of the base 29 has a hollow chamber as which leads into the hollow opening of the chamber This hollow opening 3| is internally threaded along its entire length. Within opening iii an externally threaded small circular member 32 having a central opening is adapted to be seated and which may be moved upwards or downwards within the opening 3| by a key 33, as shown in Fig. 6. A hollow tube 34 is attached at right angles to the hollow member 2i with its central opening 35 communicating with the opening iii and since there is a central opening in the small member 32 it thus communicates with the sound receiving chamber 30. By turning the small member 32 with the key 33 the volume of the sound receiving chamber 38 is somewhat changed consequently varying the pitch or" any sound which may pass through the sound receiving chamber. A rubber tubing (not shown) is attached over the end of the hollow tube as is well known in the art, which leads to the ear pieces of the well known form of stethoscope.

In Fig. '2 I have shown a modification of the right angle stethoscope shown in Fig. 6. This stethoscope comprises a base 355 which has a sound receiving chamber 3?. The base has a central internally threaded opening within which a central member 38 is adapted to be seated. The end of the central member 33 which passes into the central opening of the base it is threaded and an internally threaded nut 39 is adapted to be seated upon the threaded upper portion of the member 38. A central channel runs through the center of the member 33 and closed at the upper end. A right angle hollow tubing ill is joined at the upper portion of the central member 38 and its central opening communicates with the channel til which is into the sound receiving chamber By turn the threaded member 38 and resetting the nut the volume of the sound receiving chamber can be varied thus changing the pitch of the sound which passes into the sound receiving chamber 31. The dot and dash lines t3 show a higher po sition of the central member 38. The usual tubing of stethoscopes is attached over toe and of the tubing ll, which in turn leads to the pieces.

The thin cover shown in Fig. 3 and the flanged disks shown in Fig. 4, can be used at the of the right angle stethoscope shown in 6 7. The same coverings can also be adapted to fit over the base 2| shown in Fig. 5 to provide sanitary and hygienic means for these of stethoscopes.

In Fig. 8 I have shown the bell type of stethoscopes which also have its sound receiving cham ber varied to alter the pitch of the device. This stethoscope comprises a base which is hell shaped and has a sound receiving chamber at its lower end which leads into a central. threaded opening 46. Within the opening there is a hollow threaded member l whic attached to a hollow pipe 58. By turning the pipe G8 the member 41 can be raised or lo: "ed thus varying the size of the sound receivin. chamber 45, as is shown by the dot and dash line 153. The end of pipe as may be attached to a rubber tubing which leads to the ear pie es of the stethoscope which is well known in the art. The hollow opening 5E} of the pipe at; communicates through the central opening of the threaded member 41 and thence into the sound receiving chamber 45 so that the sound may travel into the rubber tubing (not shown).

Of course the cover and the disk shown in Figs. 3 and 4 respectively, may be adapted to fit over the lower end of the base 44 and which may be discarded after each use for sanitary and hygienic purposes.

The base members shown in Figs. 1, 6, '7 and 8 and the auxiliary member shown in Fig. may be made of either solid metal or different forms of plastic.

It is obvious that various changes and modifications may be made in the details of construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the general spirit of the invention.

I claim:

A stethoscope comprising a transmitter head consisting of a solid block having a circular concaved bottom surface and being formed with a threaded opening extending entirely through the block, the lower end of the threaded opening communicating with the concaved bottom surface centrally thereof, a tubular member of substantially thickness being externally threaded throughout its length and open at its respective ends, said tubular member being threaded into the threaded opening in said block with its upper end portion extending beyond the upper face of the block to provide a stethoscope tube 6 receiving nipple, said threaded tubular member being adapted for longitudinal adjustment in the threaded opening in the block for causing the lower end of the tubular member to be disposed in predetermined spaced relation with respect to the lower end of the opening in the block to provide a sound pocket of desired depth below the tubular member, the length of the sound pocket being defined by the distance between the lower end of the threaded opening in the block and the corresponding lower end of the tubular member, and a nut threaded on the upper end of the tubular member engaging the upper face of the block to retain the tubular threaded member in its adjusted position.

JULIUS BRANDENBURG.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 706,627 Worthington Aug. 12, 1902 917,654 Pierman Apr. 6, 1909 1,132,729 Macomber Mar. 23, 1915 1,157,428 Sheppard Oct. 19, 1915 1,543,453 Smithline June 23, 1925 1,841,078 Baird Jan. 12, 1932 1,994,008 Torrance Mar. 12., 1935 2,036,980 Beard Apr. '7, 1936 2,215,585 Huenlich Sept. 24, 1940 2,541,164 Huenlich Feb. 13, 1951

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4461368 *Apr 15, 1982Jul 24, 1984Plourde R GillesDiaphragm cover for a stethoscope
US4867265 *Jan 3, 1989Sep 19, 1989Wright L BradleyPre-cordial stethoscope cover
US4867268 *Jan 7, 1988Sep 19, 1989Ulert Izaak ASanitary stethoscope
US4871046 *May 23, 1988Oct 3, 1989Turner Kenneth RDisposable stethoscope head shield
US5269314 *Jan 9, 1992Dec 14, 1993Dwain KendallStethoscope cover
US5365023 *May 13, 1993Nov 15, 1994Lawton Gary PElastomeric stethoscope cover
US5428193 *Apr 1, 1994Jun 27, 1995Mandiberg; RobertStethoscope cover
US5448025 *Jul 19, 1994Sep 5, 1995Stark; Wayne T.Cover for stethoscope head
US7866437 *Sep 30, 2008Jan 11, 2011Tgmdvm, Inc.Stethoscope with one-handed operation