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Publication numberUS2651578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1953
Filing dateDec 13, 1949
Priority dateDec 13, 1949
Publication numberUS 2651578 A, US 2651578A, US-A-2651578, US2651578 A, US2651578A
InventorsBodolay Stephen M, Vecchia Daniel S
Original AssigneeStephen Bodolay Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package and method of making it
US 2651578 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sgpt. 8, 1953 s. M.'BODIOLAIY ET AL 8 PACKAGE AND METHOD OF MAKING IT Filed Deb. 15, 1949 2 sheets-sheet 2 Patented Sept. 8, 1953 UNITED PACKKGEANDEMETHOD Stephen M-.- Bo.dolay,- Springfield, g n l s vecchiatMefl-fpri; Mass., assigndrs to Stephen Bodolax lnm, springfiel liiesena. co o ation.

ftMassa hnsettsl e and; to some. ext nt: ins-Shane; to, encase. them" in. a wrapper; i; S so,astto,form.axpaska eferzz div .11 L have not been suqceseml+ h ic Qk r n tz QQz fra ile. to: withstandin ;DESSMQIQ; h h.195k are-subie t dtbyoustomary: r nni rgim Moreover, if: w ap d Q-tfi htly oftenrbursts by reason. of; shrinlia per or swelling oitheiconten stv E.

protectingzthe; crackers from. ustaand Q extent-xfromtmoisturetoit nmradequ vent the. crackers from Eth'SQIhiIlg- II19 q losing their. crispneeS; i-fi-vithey areno u some: considerable; time af r-poem 11%;1, M. over, the. loosenesseof; the;crackelisrwithimmea velope may. result in causingfihenrt fi umthlfi andcrack and thus lose the, dfi i dr-i-z rfihifi s; pearance. The present invention-he ri iio ei ject the provision of a novel oa sing onwrap for crackers or the. like: Agfurther ohjeet D provide. a,nove1,.packa .ecomnrisine tw 9.0 more: cracke s. disposed oneabpve theotherrand nzreg r ist y; ndo wrappin 0.1: casineidesigned. p e ventsubstantial: relative; movementing ofthe crackers or-gshri-nkageof the wrapp itself withoutbursting or opening.aoi;*its seam r and which at the 53,1118,timeais ,SQ:Wve1 ?S63 1Bd'a5; adequately to prevent: the entry; .0f: 'm,QiStu1-:e=, further object is to" provide {a cracker package: comprising a plurality of crackers .ofsthe saltine type arranged 1 one above thetother. and:- in=regis;-.; try, and a.v casing or wrapping rofzthin; transparw entmoisture-impervi1.ms sheetimaterialz havina m i u .e-:-.- A,furth rt b e ttieto c ackere andrwhosemaremal: or ions; r over.-

2 mer iml rzertmmhichgre overlapped nd. h ting means so uniting 'theoverlepfied mo e file portionea ong er sed ubttantial rnar lle l n SE-tQvQrQ jdouhle s a t or he x lusioni rov de; a cr ck err naelta e-w inia nhire i f. sub ta i l e tan ular craq fifim are a ed ne ei ry, on above the other, and cl iine ethinr o tur r imnerviqus easing pnwrapper. which hous s; h

' ouefwrappe If-Sy lh nl t i,theywreneerehavine;marg nal;por-, tions; ,whie extend beyonaithetendedgesof the rae sersgandra so wine-mamm l portionewhich ext nd: eyond: onet oneitudin l, d e, f; 7 each cracker, the marginal pgrtiflns;adjacenttqeaeh i; said z d es, heme; -n e =v and, b i fus ;th reby prov ding t.v heg n lrx fl o sture- A, .v de-a me hod; of, makin :1 nae s ra-or he ike com:

-c aflnej n wran e pr in sheet ot-the. conte ts of h Ariurtne bi t orith m vmtd'isi provide a novel method of paolmging creolere fiheflikeethat; the are-thorough y enait xfieele h eemet t sph r c 1 9 5? i th miennd warm :Qftr he selt tne overlapped, longitudinal, marginal portions of the,

wrapper as having been turned upwardly and preparatory to the cutting of the blanks 4 This thermoplastically coated cord may be united to the sheet material by heat and pressure alone and without the use of a solvent. If a solvent be employed in providing an easy opening tab, the odor of the solvent persists even after the solvent has apparently evaporated, and would impart an offensive flavor to the crackers encased within the wrapper. This cord extends from one edge 6 to the other edge l, preferably being slightly inclined with reference to the edge 8.

heat-sealed adjacent to the upper surface of the package;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig; but illustrating the first heat-sealing step in uniting the overlapped margins of the wrapper at one end of the package;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary section showing the overlapped margins of the wrapper at the completion of the first heat-sealing operation at the end of the package;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary plan view showing the folded-in corners of the end margins subsequent to the first heat-sealing of the end margins;

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 9 but showing the end margins at the completion of the second heat-sealing operation; and

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the completed casing or wrapper, but omitting the contents.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral l designates a package of crackers illustrative of the Preferably, to facilitate the ripping operation, slits i I and i2 are provided at each side of the cord l0,

. extending inwardly from the transverse edges 6 present invention. This package comprises two crackers 2 and 3 (Fig. 2) disposed one above the other in re istering relation and enclosed in an airtight wrapper 4 (Fig. 12) which is of thin, flexible, moisture-impervious, sheet, heat-sealing material, preferably transparent, although it may be colored if desired. For instance, the sheet material may be a synthetic plastic, for example, cellophane, or a thermoplastically coated metal foil, such as aluminum foil.

The crackers here illustrated by way of example of the utility and practice of the invention are of the saltine type, being duplex crackers each having a line of weakness formed by perforations indicated at 5 so that the two parts of the cracker may be separated easily. These crackers (here illustrated by way of example) are customarily 4 inches long and 2 inches wide and slightly less than inch in thickness so that the package consisting of two superposed crackers may approximate T95 of an inch in thickness. However, the above dimensions are given merely by way of illustration, it being understood that the invention is applicable to the formation of packages employing crackers of all sizes and dimensions and of different types as well as other wafer-like articles, for example cookies or fancy biscuits.

The wrapper 4 is made from a sheet 4 (Fig. 4) of the selected wrapping material, preferably a synthetic plastic such for instance as cellophane, which is capable of being heat sealed. For use in making the package here illustrated, comprising the crackers above referred to, this sheet or blank A may be approximately 5 inches wide, that is to say horizontally, and 5% inches long, having the parallel, transverse top and bottom edges 6 and 1 and the parallel right and left edges 8 and 9 respectively.

Preferably this blank 4* is provided with a strong rip cord In, preferably a cord made of cotton with a synthetic plastic coating. Such a cord may be heat sealed to the sheet material and'l. These slit-portions are provided at the opposite ends of the rip cord to facilitate graspinglthe cord'in ripping the wrapper from the package,

'I-Iaving' prepared thiswrapper blank 4 the cracker 3 which is to be the lowermost cracker in the package, is located on this wrapper blank in the-space 3 in Fig. '4, with its lateral edges at E and E spaced inwardly from the edges 9 and 8 respectively, of the wrapper so as to leave the mar inal portions l3 and I4 of the wrapper at each end of the cracker. The cracker is likewise arranged so that one longitudinal edge is located at E spaced from the edge I so as to'leave a marginal portion E5 of the blank projecting beyond the edge at E the other longitudinal edge of the cracker then being at E As a practical matter, the crackers 2 and 3 are assembled and placed as a unit on the blank. However, the

crackers and blank may be otherwise associated so as'to bring them in the relative position illustrated in Fig. 4. Before placing the crackers on the blank, the latter is placed upon a suitable support or abutment l6 (Figs. 5 and 8) which may, for example, be a rigid steel die block having a downwardly and outwardly sloping beveled face l8 over which the margin I5 of the blank projects in assembling the parts. After having assembled the parts in this way so that they rest on the abutment block it, the edge 6 of the wrapper is carried upwardly and about the assembled crackers, the wrapper blank bending along the line E so as to form the vertical edge wall 20 (Fig. 6) The wrapper also bends about the upper rear edge of the upper cracker 2 to form the horizontal top wall 2| of the wrapper, and again bends down about the forward upper edge of the upper cracker to form the front wall 22 of the package. The marginal portion 23 of the wrapper, adjacent to the edge 6, extends down substantially parallel to the projecting margin [5 which overlies the beveled face l8 of the abutment. lower corner parallel to the surface 58 of the die block i6, is now moved into contact with the margin 23 and is caused to press the margin 23 forcibly against the margin l5. Since the member N5 is heated, this pressure causes the margins 23 and I5 to coalesce within a narrow transverse area of approximately the dimensions of the inclined beveled surface it. Because the surface [8 slopes downwardly and away from the lower face of the bottom cracker, the pressure may be applied without injury to the crackers but the area of coalescence or heat seal extends very close to the edge of the cracker (Fig. 6) so that the crackers are closely embraced by the wrapper. However, the part 16 exerts no direct pressure on the crackers, the seal 24 (Fig. 6) being formed directly between the parts l6 and IE and its 10- cation is not changed by any slight irregularities A heated presser 16*, having a beveled' answers 5 which may exist :the size nor shape of :the crackers :being 'wrapped.

After the :first heat-sealing operation, the united marginal :fiaps ii: :and 23 :are turned "upwardlyso as to stand substantially vertical, as shown in Fig. -7, bending sharply along the lower forward-edge of'the lowercracker. lAs illus'trated, the forward flap i5 is somewhat wider than the flap i 2 3, so that the uppermost portion-oi the flap -i"5-extends beyond the edge of the fiap 23. This upwardly proj ecting edge portion f the flap i is now pressed (preferably by meansof a heated die 2 5, Fig. 7) against .the bodyof the wrapper, near the upper front edge of the upper cracker, only slight pressure being employed so as 1 to tack the flap -i5 to the -bodyof the wrapper-along a se'cond-sealing-area 25*, thus producingadoubleseal and giving a neat appearance.

Having drawn th wrapper blank around the crackers and having *provided a two-fold -'seal atone longitudinal edge wall of the package, the end margins of theresultantenibryo package are next folded and sealed. As illustrated in Fig. 8, the 'abutment-or'die block 16 is provided along its right and left ends withupstanding ridges 26 having curved inner faces 2-! and'downwardly and outwardly sloping beveled faces '28. The lower cracker 3,-with the portion H of the wrapper underlying it, extends from the inner surface ilTof-one of the ridges 26'-to the inner'surface 2-! of the corresponding ridge (not shown) at the opposite end of the block. Thesurfaces 21 and 28 meet at an'upwardly acute edge 29. Initiallythe marginal portions i3 and It at opposite edges of "the wrapper blank extendoutwardly and upwardly over the edges 29, and *the corresponding margina1 portions I3 and I4 (which now form extensions of the upper wall 2| of theembryo wrapper) overlie the marginal portions I3 and I4 respectively. The superposed marginal portions are now bent downwardly onto the surface 28 (Fig. 8) thus drawing the wrapper in a transverse direction about the crackers. Preferably, before the heat sealing operation is performed, the corners 34 and 35 of'the end margins (Fig. 10) are folded inwardly along diagonal lines. Heated presser members 32 (Fig. 8), one of which is arranged at each end of the stationary block or die 16, (these presser members '32 having beveled lower surfaces of the same slope as the surfaces 28) are moved into contact with the upper flaps 133 and it respectively, and'force these flaps into contact with the flaps i3 and respectively. Because the part 32 is heated,'the pressureof the -fiap's between the rigid dies 16 and 32 eau'sesthe flaps to fuse at narrow transversely extending areas having substantially the dimensions of the surfaces 28. As shown 'in Fig. 8, the height 'of the ridge 26 is such that the edge 29 is about mid-way of the heightof the lowermost cracker 3 andas the edge "29 is acute, the action of thediesis to-form a sharp fold line at the edge, and the area of fusing extends substantially to the fold line. The pressure is exerted between'the opposed "diesyno substantial force being applied to the crackers suchas mig'ht crumble them. A perfectheat seal is thus made possible since as much pressure as necessary may h applied without damage to the crackers.

After the :heat seal 33 (Fig. 11) :has "been formed, the united flaps 1.3 ;and .l 3*.and 4-4 *eand 14 are then turned upwardly, as illustrated in Fig. 11, .and their upper margins are tacked to the body of the wrapper along lines such as the line 36 :ofiliig. $11, in the same wayias illustrated in Fig. F1.

The formation of the heat seals at :33 iand'36 provides a double seal at each end of the package. ii h'e wrapper embraces the crackers :so that they cannot:shiftsrelatively :to each 1 other :to any substantialextent, and'thus crumblingis reduced to .azminimum. Moreover, 'therside and-endawalls ofithefpackage are smooth andsubstantiallyperpendicul'ar to the top and bottom surfaces so that the apackageis'of neat appearance :andcapable of being packed with similar packages inza container without loss of space. Furthermore, the .tough wrapper holds the crackers together so that they act as a unit, reinforcing each other against forces which tend to break them, and the packaged crackers are much less subject to breakage than though they were merely placed loosely in an envelope or similar container.

.iIhe "above described operations may be ,performed by hand or-by the use of such simple implements as above described, or maybe carried out by;properly organized machinery. It is lfurther'tobe understood that .while heat sealingis preferred, the double sealing at one longitudinal edgeand at the ends may beprovided in other ways, for example by the employment of adhesive or the like. However heat sealing is;preferable because it may be performed very :rapidly and the seal thus formed is not afiected by atmospheric moisture.

While the wrapper has herein been referred to as of moisture-impervious material it is :to beiunderstood that this term is used in a relative senseand as suggestive-of the moisture-resistant characteristic of such resinous materials-as cellophane and the like which, although resistant to moisture forlong periods, ar not absolutely and completely impervious to the passage of moisture.

When the completed package is to be opened it is merely necessary to seize the wrapper materialibetweenthe lines H-H or l2-|2, whichever'area of the wrapper is at the exterior, after the completion of thepackage, and to exert force tending to unwrap :the rip cord ['6 from around the package. The ripping of this cord from around the package removes astrip of the wrapper, thu'slleaving the wrapper open'at one end so that the crackers are readily accessible.

It may again be noted that the heat seals formed at 24 and 33 between the opposed surfaces of the rigid dies are definitely located by the dimensions of the die it, and that the formation -'of these heat seals is independent of the exact size or shape of the cracker, :and that .as much pressure as necessary to insure a good seal may be employed in forming theseheatls'eals without any regard to the frangible character ofthe articles bein wrapped. Furthermore, the novel method of wrappingis not limitedto crackers or wafers of rectangular shape but is readily applicable to the wrapping of wafers of other shapes and dimensions, and whether one or a greater number of wafersare to be enclosed in the wrapper.

'While for ease in description reference has been made to bottom and top wafers, and "to folding or bending the wrapper upwardly or downwardly, etc., such terms are not to be re- 'garded as limiting, since the package maybe formed with the wafer disposed in any convenient position.

While certain dimensions have herein been suggested as illustrative and while a particular order of steps has been suggested as desirable,

it is to b understood that the invention is not thus to be limited but only as defined in the following claims. We. claim:

l. A package comprising a wafer and a protective casing for the wafer, the casing consisting of a single thin sheet of transparent moisture-impervious material, the sheet forming substantially parallel top and bottom walls, side walls and end walls, marginal portions of the sheet being overlapped along one side wall and at opposite ends of the package, respectively, overlapping portions of the material, at opposite ends of the package and adjacent to said side wall, being heat sealed together along each of two narrow, vertically spaced, horizontal areas one of which is adjacent to the top wall of the package.

2. A package comprising two substantially rectangular elongate wafers disposed one above the other in registering relation and a protective casing for the wafers, the casing consisting of a single thin sheet-of transparent, moisture-impervious material, the sheet forming substantially parallel top and bottom walls, side walls and end walls, marginal portions of the sheet being overlapped along one transverse side wall, and other marginal portions being overlapped at opposite ends respectively of the package, the sheet material being tensioned snugly about the wafers and being of a type capable of being heat sealed, each set of overlapped margins being heat sealed together along a narrow area extending along one edge of the lowermost wafer and extending close to said edge, and each set oi overlapping margins being also fused together along a second narrow area extending along an edge of the uppermost wafer and close to said edge.

3. A package comprising two substantially rectangular wafers disposed one above the other in registering relation and a protective casing for the wafers, the casing consisting of a sheet of thin, transparent, moisture-impervious material enveloping the wafers, the casing comprising top and bottom walls, side walls and end walls, the side and end walls being substantially perpendicular to the top and bottom walls, the marginal portions of the sheet being overlapped, said overlapping marginal portions being hermetically sealed together along a narrow area closely adjacent to the edge of one of said wafers, the same overlapping marginal portions being hermetically sealed together along a second narrow area adjacent to the corresponding edge of the other wafer thereby providing a double seal to prevent the entry of moisture.

4. A package comprising a plurality of wafers disposed one above the other in registering relalation and a protective casing for the wafers, the casing consisting of a single sheet of thin, flexible, moisture-impervious, synthetic resin and comprising pcrtions forming parallel top and bottom walls and other portions forming transverse side walls and end walls, the side and end walls being substantially perpendicular to the top and bottom walls, the bottom wall having a marginal flap at its free transverse edge, the lower edge of one transverse side wall also having a marginal flap, said flaps being heat sealed together along a narrow transversely extending area closely adjacent to the junction of the bottom wall and said latter transverse side wall, both flaps extending upwardly, from the area at which they are so sealed together, to the upper edge of the lastnamed transverse side wall, the same flaps being heat sealed together and to said last-named transverse side wall along a second narrow, trans- 8 versely extending area adjacent to the junction of the latter side wall with the top wall.

5. A package comprising two substantially rectangular wafers disposed one above the other in registering relation and a protective casing for the wafers, the casing consisting of a single sheet of thin, flexible moisture-impervious, synthetic resin and comprising portions forming substantially parallel top and bottom walls and other portions forming transverse side walls and end walls, the side and end walls being substantially perpendicular to the bottom and top walls, the bottom wall having marginal flaps at the opposite ends of the package and each end wall having a marginal flap at its lower edge, the marginal flaps at each end of the bottom wall being hermetically sealed to the marginal flaps of the corresponding end walls, the sealing being along transversely extending lines closely adjacent to the junctions of the bottom and respective end walls, the corners of the flaps at each end being turned inwardly along diagonal lines, both marginal flaps at each end of the package extending upwardly from the aforesaid lines at which they are sealed together, the free edge portions of the marginal flaps at each end of the package being coalesced with the Wrapping material adjacent to the junction of each end wall with the top wall.

6. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of moisture-impervious thermoplastically adhesive material, disposing at least one wafer upon the wrapper sheet adjacent to but spaced from one transverse edge of the latter, thereby leaving a transverse marginal flap of the sheet projecting beyond the wafer, drawing the sheet up and about the wafer and disposing its free transverse margin in overlapping relation to the aforenamed marginal flap and so that said overlapped margins extend beyond the edge of the wafer, and while rigidly supporting said projecting flaps applying heat and pressure to the overlapping margins along a line closely adjacent to the edge of the wafer but without applying substantial pressure to the wafer, thereby heatsealing the overlapped margins along a line close to the lower longitudinal edge of the wafer, turning the overlapping margins up and uniting the upturned marginal flap to the wrapping material adjacent to the upper longitudinal edge of the water.

'7. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of moisture-impervious thermoplastically adhesive material, disposing a plurality of superposed registering wafers upon the wrapper sheet adjacent to but spaced from one transverse edge of the latter, thereby leaving a trans verse marginal flap of the sheet projecting beyond the lowermost wafer, drawing the sheet up and about the wafers and disposing its free transverse margin in overlapping relation to the aforenamed marginal flap and so that said overlapped marigns project beyond the edge of the lowermost wafer and while rigidly supporting said projecting margins applying heat and pressure to the overlapping margins along a line closely adjacent to the edge of the lowermost wafer thereby hermetically to seal said margins together, and then turning said margins up and hermetically sealing the marginal flaps together and to the wrapper sheet along a line close to the longitudinal edge of the uppermost wafer.

8. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible alonga transversely extending'area close to-the transverse-edge.of.the lowermostwaf er thereby 'to fuse said marginstogether.

9. That method of" packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheetof moisture-impervious thermoplastically adhesive material, disposing at least one wafer upon the wrapper sheet with the opposite edges of the wafer spaced substantially equally from the lateral edges of the sheet, thereby leaving an end margin of the wrapper sheet projecting at each end of the wafer, drawing the wrapper about the wafer and rigidly supporting the transverse margins of the wrapper in overlapping relation and so that they slope downwardly and outwardly from the lower edge of the wafer while subjecting said margins to heat and pressure to unite them, thereby forming an embryo package, overlapping the projecting upper and lower portions of the end margins of the Wrapper at each end of the package, rigidly supporting said overlapped margins at each end so that they slope downwardly and outwardly from the lower lateral edge respectively of the wafer, subjecting the overlapped end margins along a line close to the edge of the lowermost wafer to heat and pressure to unite them, turning up the overlapped and united marginal portions at each end of the package and fusing the overlapped end marginal portions to the wrapper along lines closely adjacent to the upper lateral edge of the wafer respectively.

10. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of moisture-impervious thermoplastic material, disposing a plurality of superposed registering wafers upon the wrapper sheet so as to leave margins of the wrapper projecting beyond a transverse edge and both end edges of the lowermost wafer, tensioning the wrapper sheet about the wafers and placing the transverse marginal portions of the wrapper in overlapping relation, thereby holding the wafers tightly together, rigidly supporting said overlapped transverse marginal portions so that they project beyond the edge of the lowermost wafer and applying heat and pressure to heat-seal the overlapped transverse marginal portions of the wrapper to form an embryo package, sealing together the upper and lower end marginal portions of the wrapper at the opposite ends, respectively, of the package, and thereafter up-turning the overlapped united marginal portions at the side and each end of the package to lie against the side and against the ends, respectively, of the package, and sticking said up-turned marginal portions at the side and each end of the package to the body of the wrapper proper, adjacent to the upper edges of the uppermost wafer.

11. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrap- 10 per: sheetizof, moisture-impervious thermoplastic material, disposing two rectangular wafers in superposechregistering,relationuponthe wrapper sheet so: that marginal? portions of. the wrapper sheetprojecti-beyond:the; ends and a transverse edge, respectively; of: the lowermost wafer, drawingz-the: wrapper sheet up and-about the wafers and1rigidly' supporting its transverse and end marginal, portions; respectively; in overlapping relation; and: so; that they incline downwardly fromsthe;edgeszofitherlower'wafer; subjecting said overlapping'margins totheatv and:pressure; thereby? unitingthermarignaatp each end andalong said transverse; edge. respectively, along narrow, transversely extending; areas; which -1 extend: close totthe:edges-of;thezlowermost wafer,- and turning the. overlapped: andi'uniteck marginal portions at each; endzan'd"; atsaid'ztransverse: edge respectively, vertically upiand'istickimg saidxupturnedi: marginal portions. to: the: bodye of; the: wrapper; at. narrow areas extending along the upper transverse and end edges of the upper wafer.

12. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of thermoplastic material, disposing a plurality of rectangular wafers in superposed registering relation upon the wrapper sheet so that the end margins of the wrapper sheet project beyond the respective ends of the lower wafer, drawing the wrapper sheet about the wafers and uniting its transverse marginal portions, thereby forming an embryo package wherein the respective end margins of the wrapper sheet comprise upper and lower overlapped portions, folding in the corners of the united margins along diagonal lines at each end of the package, bending said upper and lower overlapped margins at each end of the package along lines approximately midway the height of the lowermost wafer so that they project downwardly and rigidly, supporting said downwardly projecting margins while subjecting said overlapping margins to heat and pressure along lines closely adjacent to the edges of the lowermost wafer, thereby fusing said overlapping portions together at a narrow area which extends close to the edge of the lowermost wafer, turning the united marginal portions vertically up at each end of the package, and fusing said upturned marginal portions at each end of the package to the body of the wrapper at narrow areas extending along the upper lateral edges of the upper wafer.

13. That method of packaging wafers which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of thermoplastic material, disposing a plurality of superposed registering wafers upon the wrapper sheet with the opposite ends of the lowermost wafer spaced substantially equally from the end edges of the sheet, thereby leaving an end margin of the wrapper exposed at each end of the lowermost wafer, drawing the wrapper about the wafers and heat-sealing the transverse marginal portions of the wrapper to each other along a line adjacent to the transverse lower edge of the lowermost wafer, thereby forming overlapping upper and lower portions of the end margins of the wrapper, which project beyond the end edges of the wafer, rigidly supporting said projecting margins while applying heat and pressure thereto along lines closely adjacent to each lateral edge, respectively, of the lowermost wafer, thereby uniting the overlapping margins at each end, and then turning said overlapping united margins at each end upwardly and sticking them to the wrapper along lines adjacent to the upper lateral edges. respectively, of the uppermost wafer.

14. That method of packaging waters which comprises as steps providing a thin, flexible wrapper sheet of thermoplastic synthetic resin, disposing a plurality of superposed registering wafers upon the wrapper sheet with the opposite edges of the lowermost wafer spaced substantially equally from the respective end edges of the sheet, thereby leaving an end margin of the wrapper exposed at each end edge of the lowermost wafer, drawing the wrapper about the wafers so that its transverse marginal portions overlap while concomitantly causing upper and lower portions of the respective end, margins to overlap, rigidly supporting the overlapping portions of the wrapper which project outwardly beyond each end edge of the lowermost wafer, drawing the overlapping end portions downwardly so that they lie in planes making acute angles with the plane of the under surface of the lower most wafer, and applying pressure and heat thereto to fuse the overlapping lateral marginal portions together along lines closely adjacent to the edge of the lowermost wafer.

STEPHEN M. BODOLAY. DANIEL S. VECCHIA.

References Cited in the file of this patent OTHER REFERENCES Food Manufacture, February 1931, pages 38 20 to 40, article entitled Transparent Wrappings.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2048213 *Feb 23, 1935Jul 21, 1936Marathon Paper Mills CoBread package
US2185469 *Oct 19, 1936Jan 2, 1940George T TrumbullSelf-sealing wrapper
US2441513 *Feb 12, 1948May 11, 1948Carl P SchmidtBread package
US2489726 *Oct 19, 1948Nov 29, 1949Salerno George FPackaged food product and packing method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2764283 *Jan 27, 1953Sep 25, 1956Celanese CorpPackaging
US2916865 *Mar 7, 1957Dec 15, 1959Scandia Packaging MachPackage sealing means
US4548018 *Jun 29, 1984Oct 22, 1985John WojnickiApparatus for horizontally forming, filling and sealing film pouch material
US4785609 *Feb 5, 1987Nov 22, 1988Sig Schweizerische Industrie-GesellschaftMethod of wrapping a flat rectangular article
US4897983 *Jun 10, 1988Feb 6, 1990Otto Hansel GmbhWrapper for tubular products, especially chocolate bars and method of manufacturing it
US5365721 *Jul 28, 1993Nov 22, 1994Focke & Co (Gmbh & Co.)Process for the packaging of articles of differing size
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/128, 53/463, 53/482, 426/410, 53/479
International ClassificationB65D75/12, B65D75/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/12
European ClassificationB65D75/12