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Publication numberUS2652048 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1953
Filing dateJun 9, 1952
Priority dateJun 9, 1952
Publication numberUS 2652048 A, US 2652048A, US-A-2652048, US2652048 A, US2652048A
InventorsJoers Carl F
Original AssigneeJoers Carl F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ear treating apparatus
US 2652048 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 15, 1953 c. F. .JOERS 2,652,048

EAR TREATING APPARATUS Filed June 9. 1952 INVENTOR.

3 6401. F. (/5525 ;9 BY

Patented Sept. 15, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 6 Claims.

This invention relates to and has for an object the provision of a new type of apparatus for treating the human ear in order to stimulate and exercise the muscles and sensitize the nerves and tissues to the reception of sound and occasion the more perfect transmission of sound impulses to the brain centers which control hear- The invention comprehends, for the above named purpose, the utilization of specially designed alternating current actuated vibratory elements so arranged and connected with applicators for the ears, as by means of flexible tubes, that vibrations electrically set up are transmitted through the applicators to and for impingement on the ear drums of a user, at selected frequencies and according to the individual comfort and desire of users, by alternately compressing and relieving pressure of the air in said tubes.

Thus, a column of air in each applicator tube is vibrated in accordance with the frequency of the vibrators and its pressure on the associated eardrum is varied rapidly, i. e. increased and relieved as the diaphragm of the vibrator is alternately extended and retracted, bellows-like, in response to and under the influence of mechanical, electrical or other media. Obviously, when forces are applied to the diaphragm alternately in opposite directions the column of air in the associated tube alternately reflects such impulses against and away from the ear drum as the air in the column is slightly compressed and expanded, respectively, and to an extent dependent upon the intensity of the resultant impulses.

An important object is to provide separate vibrators for the two human ears, together with means for actuating the diaphragms of said vibrators either synchronously and in phase so that the two diaphragms will simultaneously extend and retract with equal effect on both ears, or at least the impulses applied thereto, will be similar. When operated nonsynchronously or out of phase, one diaphragm will be extended while the other is retracted, thereby applying pressure to one ear while relieving pressure on the other car.

I have determined from experimentation that when the two diaphragms are out of phase the response of the brain to such a condition appears to be such as to reconcile the opposite effects on the delicate organs and tissues of the two ears. In any case an out-of-phase treatment indicates a beneficial effect on a user which is emphasized by the soothing eifect of a subsequent iii-phase treatment.

Another object is to provide an electrical apparatus which includes a pair of dynamic speakers connected with separate applicators by flexible tubes, each dynamic unit having an electrically activated sound responsive vibratory diaphragm, and an electric circuit operatively connected therewith and adapted to receive energy from a convenient source.

Another object is to arrange and mount all of the several necessary and desirable electrical elements of the unit in a small and compact carrying case equipped with suitable controls and indicators whereby the unit may be conveniently carried from one to another place of treatment and conditioned for use by merely connecting a lead-in conductor with an electrical socket. The controls are so identified that they may be readily set and operated by an unskilled person for self -treatment of each ear separately or both ears simultaneously and either in or out of phase.

Other objects may appear as the description of my unit progresses.

I have shown a preferred form of unit embodying my invention in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a perspective View of a unit with the carrying case open and electrically connected with a conventional wall socket for operation;

Fig. 2 is a circuit diagram of the elements of the unit; and

Fig. 3 is a cross sectional View of one of the electrically actuated vibratory elements for creating impulses in the air columns within the applicator tubes.

A complete unit includes a carrying case A and a lid B hinged thereto and adapted to be latched or looked as by a suitable latch I, a suitable horizontal panel 2 in said case and approximately in the plane of the upper edges of the Walls of the case, for the purpose of ready accessibility and convenience. A cord 3 is normally borne by the case A within a compartment 5 at the rear of the case and is arranged to be withdrawn and extended, as shown in Fig. 1, for connection with a wall socket 5 so as to supply electrical energy to all of the sub-units which are held in a compartment of the case below panel 2 and are in circuit as shown in Fig. 2.

A pair of electrically actuated vibratory units in the form of dynamic loud speakers 0 and D of well known characteristics constitute major components of the electrical system, are mounted in the case A on a vertical wall 6 which may separate compartment l of the case from the forward compartment beneath panel 2. Each unit C and D, of typical cross section and arrangement as shown in Fig. 3 includes a cylindrical permanent magnet I or Id, at one end of which is a polar ring 8 or 8a, at the other end of which is a disc 9 or Be, and in the center of which is a polar post it] as at IU secured to disc 9 or 9a which is extended into a central aperture H in ring 8 or Be.

Magnet 1 and la are secured to mountings I2 and [2a, respectively, which in turn are suitably secured to wall or panel 5, for rigidly holding the units 7 and m in operating position. Conical diaphragms i3 and i3a of flexible material are held at their peripheries in axial alinement with the other parts of units l and 1a, respectively, by mountings i2 and lid on wall 6.

Diaphragms i3 and Mia have cylindrical sections i322 of dielectric material which extend through apertures H of pole piece 8 into magnets 1 or la and embrace the polar posts ll! of units C and D in each case. Extensions i319 are centralized within their respective magnets I and 7a by a pair of cooperating elements !4 and E5 in each unit which are axially apertured to receive said extensions. Element I4 is of flexible material and corrugated cross sectional form while element i5 is of disked cross section and member i4 rests thereupon. A conventional speaker coil I6 is wound on each of extensions i323 within the field of the associated permanent magnets i or 1a,

The dynamic units C and D are arranged for connection, respectively, with ear applicators E and E by means of flexible tubes 11 and Ila which are attached at their near ends to nipples l8 and Ella extended from wall 6 and are coaxial with the conical diaphragms i3 and 13a. Usually the flexible tubes i? and [la are directly connected with short sections lib, 11b of hard rubber so as to readily and replaceably mount the applicators E and E on the remote ends of the hard rubber sections.

A spring 18 is attached at its opposite ends to the near end portions of the hard rubber tubes and has a sufficiently long looped or bentintermediate section to afford ample resiliency and spreading of the applicators to accommodate the applicators to different persons for treatment.

When arranged as described it is obvious that vibrations set up by the diaphragms l3 and 23a will be transmitted through nipples i8 and Wet, tubes il' and lid, tubes lib, ill) and applicators E and E to the ears of a person being treated. Hence, the impulses thereby created alternately increase and decrease the pressures of the air bodies in said tubes and produce a correspondingly stimulating effect on the tissues, muscles, ear drums and other parts of both ears, either simultaneously or individually, in phase or out of phase.

Now, referring to 2, particularly it will be observed that the lead-in wire E5 of cord 3 is connected at 2| with a primary terminal of a transformer which is generally indicated at F. The other primary terminal 22 is connected by a wire 23 with a terminal 24 of a double pole snap switch 25; a lamp 26 being bridged between wire i9 and transformer terminal 22. A spark condenser 26' is connected between wire 23 and a terminal 2'! of switch 25 by a wire 28 and a heating coil 29 is bridged between wires 23 and 28 and includes a bimetallic bar 33 and a contact device 31-32. Contact 3! connects with wire 23 at 23 and contact 32 with the heater coil. The other terminal of said heater coil connects with wire 28 by a Wire 34.

Lead-in wire 20 connects at a terminal 35 with a master switch 36 which, in turn is connected at 31 to a wire 38 which is connected at 39 and 40 through branches to the double pole snap switch 25.

The secondary coil, of transformer F is correspondingly connected with the speaker units 1 and la through wires 4| and 42 leading to terminals 4l42 and 4344 respectively of the speaker coils (not shown). A branch 45 of wire 42 leads to one terminal of a rheostat 46 having a movable contact 41 operatively connected with a knob 48 on panel 2 while speaker terminal 43 is connected with the other rheostat terminal by a wire 49. Wires 4| and 42 reversibly connect the secondary coil of transformer F with terminals 42 and 44 of the coil of speaker unit 7a as by means of a toggle switch 56 on panel 2-one. Wire 5! leading from said toggle switch to terminal 42 and another wire 52 therefrom to a terminal of a second rheostat 53 having a movable contact 54 operatively connected with a knob 55 on panel 2. Terminal 12 i connects with the other terminal of rheostat 53 as by means of a wire 56.

An automatic intermittent switch 51 mounted on panel 2 adjacent unit I is effective for opening and closing the circuit of heater 29 under influence of the bimetallic bar 30 thermostatically.

In operation, it is obvious that when connected with a source of alternating current through cord 3 and socket 5 the entire circuit will be energized while the master switch 36 is closed lamp 26 will be energized for indicating that the unit is operative where switch 25 is set for steady operation but will glow intermittently when switch 25 is set for intermittent operation.

When the applicators E and E are properly positioned in the ears of a person to be treated, the knobs 43 and 55 are rotated over suitable graduated scales 48a, and 55a, respectively, to an extent comfortable to one under treatment. Switch 51 is initially set for either steady or intermittent operation.

Alternating current delivered to each speaker unit l and 1a will effect the longitudinal shifting of the diaphragm extensions i3b with each reversal of. direction of current flow, thereby correspondingly and alternately compressing and expanding the air volumes in tubes I I and Ila and applying pressure to and relieving pressure against the ear drums.

Rheostats 46 and 53 under control of knobs 48 and 55 regulate the intensity and efiect of a treatment according to the will of the patient or judgment of a physician, by varying the amplitude of the pulsations set up by the units 1 and 1a.

The synchronizing knob 55 when in one position will occasion simultaneous and corresponding shifting of the diaphragms l3 and [3a inphase and corresponding compression of the air in tubes I! and IM, and when shifted to another position will produce opposite and out-of-phase effects.

Hence, the unit is readily adaptable at the will of a user to in-phase or out-of-phase operation, while the intensity of either form of treatment may be varied or equal.

I claim:

1. An ear treating apparatus comprising: a pair of electric vibrating units of the dynamic speaker type connected in parallel with an alternating electric circuit, a pair of applicators ineluding ear pieces and flexible tubes connecting the ear pieces with enclosed air spaces adjacent the diaphragms of said vibrating units whereby to alternately compress air bodies in said tubes and to relieve pressure therein as said diaphragms are alternately flexed in opposite directions, and means for separately regulating the operation of said vibrating units to vary the eirect on the ears of a patient.

2. An ear treating apparatus comprising: a pair of electric vibrating units of the dynamic speaker type connected in parallel with an alternating electric circuit, a pair of applicators including ear pieces and flexible tubes connecting the ear pieces with enclosed air spaces adjacent the diaphragms of said vibrating units whereby to alternately compress air bodies in said tubes, to relieve pressure therein as said diaphragms are alternately flexed in opposite directions, and means for separately regulating the operation of said vibrating units to vary the effect on the ears of a patient, said regulating means including devices for selectively synchronizing and desynchronizing the operation of said vibrating units so as to change the phase of one unit relative to the other unit.

3. An ear treating apparatus comprising: a pair of electric vibrating units of the dynamic speaker type connected in parallel with an alternating electric circuit, a pair of applicators including ear pieces and flexible tubes connecting the ear pieces with enclosed air spaces adjacent the diaphragms of said vibrating units whereby to alternately compress air bodies in said tubes, to relieve pressure therein as said diaphragms are alternately flexed in opposite directions, and means for separately regulating the operation of said vibrating units to vary the effect on the ears of a patient, said regulating means including devices ior selectively synchronizing and desynchronizing the operation of said vibrating units so as to change the phase of one unit relative to the other unit, and a switch in said circuit operable so that when in different positions the operation of said units will be selectively steady or intermittent.

4. An ear treating apparatus comprising: a pair of electric vibrating units of the dynamic speaker type connected in parallel with an alternating electric circuit, a pair of applicators including ear pieces and flexible tubes connecting the ear pieces with enclosed air spaces adjacent the diaphragms of said vibrating units whereby to alternately compress air bodies in said tubes, to relieve pressure therein as said diaphragms are alternately flexed in opposite directions, and means for separately regulating the operation of said vibrating units to vary the efiect on th ears of a patient, said regulating means including devices for selectively synchronizing and desynchronizing the operation of said vibrating units so as to change the phase of one unit relative to the other unit, a switch in said circuit operable so that when in different positions the operation of said units will be selectively steady or intermittent, and a thermostat in circuit with and for alternately actuating said switch to open and close the circuit of said vibrating units.

5. An ear-treating apparatus of the class described, having in combination: wall means to enclose a body of air in communication with one or" a patients eardrurns; a unit of the loud speaker type having a diaphragm included in said wall means to compress said body of air in response to electric current in one direction and to rareiy the body of air in response to electric current in the opposite direction; a second wall means to enclose a second body of air in communication with the other of the patients eardrums; a second unit of the loud speaker type having a diaphragm included in said second wall means to compress the second body of air in response to electric current in one direction and to rarefy the second body of air in response to electric current in the opposite direction; means connecting said two units in parallel in an approximately to cycle alternating circuit; and a switch in said circuit movable between a first position to cause said units to operate in phase and a second position to cause said units to operate in opposite phase.

6. An ear-treating apparatus of the class described, having in combination: wall means to enclose a body of air in communication with one of a patients eardrums; a unit of a loud speaker type having a diaphragm included in said wall means to compress said body of air in response to electric current in one direction and to rarefy the body of air in response to electric current in the opposite direction; a second wall means to enclose a second body of air in communication with the other of the patients eardrums; a second unit of the loud speaker type having a diaphragm included in said second wall means to compress the second body of air in response to electric current in one direction and to rarefy the second body of air in response to electric current in the opposite direction; means connecting said two units in parallel in an approximately 50 to 60 cycle alternating current circuit; a switch in said circuit movable between a first position to cause said units to operate in phase and a second position to cause said units to operate in opposite phase relative to each other; a second switch in said circuit having an inherent tendency to close; and thermal means in said circuit in series with said second switch adapted when heated by the circuit to open said second switch, whereby said second switch opens and closes for pulsating energization of said circuit to alternately exercise and rest the patients eardrums with rhythmic periodicity.

CARL F. JOERS.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3875932 *Mar 2, 1973Apr 8, 1975Wachspress How FAudiotactile stimulation and communications system
US3954101 *Apr 7, 1975May 4, 1976Wachspress How FAudiotactile communication system
US4003373 *Jun 23, 1975Jan 18, 1977Spelio Peter NVariable pulsating vacuum device
US4754748 *Aug 30, 1985Jul 5, 1988Jerry AntowskiApparatus for generating pneumatic pressure pulses for application to the external acoustic meatus of a patient
US4757807 *Jan 9, 1987Jul 19, 1988Barbara DensertFor generation/transmission of complex pressure surges in the inner ear
US6159171 *Dec 20, 1996Dec 12, 2000Pascal Medical AbDevice for affecting the hydrodynamic system of the inner ear
US7022090Aug 9, 1999Apr 4, 2006Medtronic, Inc.Transportable apparatus for treating Meniere's disease
WO2000010484A2 *Aug 9, 1999Mar 2, 2000Engvall DanielTransportable apparatus for treating meniere's disease
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/76, 601/10, 381/182
International ClassificationA61F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F11/00
European ClassificationA61F11/00