Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2652856 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1953
Filing dateFeb 8, 1951
Priority dateFeb 8, 1951
Publication numberUS 2652856 A, US 2652856A, US-A-2652856, US2652856 A, US2652856A
InventorsFrank Welty, Welty Raymond D
Original AssigneeCarbonic Dispenser Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Faucet for dispensing carbonated beverages
US 2652856 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1953 F. WELTY ET AL ,65

FAUCET FOR DISPENSING CARBONATED BEVERAGES Filed Feb. 8, 1951 Q1 .1, v 9 h 1 N Q i Q a 1 3nventors FRANK WELTY RAYMOND o. WELTY Patented Sept. 22, 1953 FAUCET FOR DISPENSING CARBONATED BEVERAGES Frank Welty and Raymond D. Welty, Youngstown, Ohio, assignors to Carbonic Dispenser, Inc., Canficld, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application February 8, 1951, Serial No. 209,941

9 Claims.

This invention relates to faucets and valves and more particularly to means for accurately and effectively controlling the flow of carbonated liquids under high pressure.

An object of this invention is the provision of a novel device for dispensing beer, soft drinks, carbonated water, and the like.

A more specific object of this invention lies in the provision of a faucet of this type wherein a novel arrangement of parts is utilized to provide a compact unit of utmost simplicity, yet which is operative to accurately control the flow of carbonated liquids with a minimum loss of carbonation.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a faucet of this type wherein the various components are of utmost simplicity in design and may be manufactured without the use of specialized machinery.

Yet another object of the invention is the provision of a faucet of the character described which may be easily and quickly assembled and disassembled, for such cleaning and repairs as may be deemed necessary, by a person not particularly skilled in mechanics, Without the aid of tools.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a faucet of this type embodying a novel principle of operation whereby opening and closing of the valve is greatly facilitated.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a faucet of this type wherein several embodiments of the apparatus, incorporating different principles of operation may be realized through a mere substitution of interchangeable parts.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon full consideration of the following detailed specification and accompanying drawing wherein are shown certain preferred embodiments of our invention.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is an axial section of a dispensing valve constructed according to the principles of our invention;

Figure 2 is an axial section of a second embodiment of our invention wherein remote operation is utilized;

Figure 3 is a third embodiment of our invention wherein a self-closing feature is utilized; and

Figure 4 is a section view taken along line IV-IV of Figure 3.

As will be noted throughout the following disclosure the dispensing faucet of our invention has been constructed in such manner as to effect a h degree of versatility. As will be understood, there are many types of dispensing faucets of this character which are in demand to suit the varied requirements of taverns and soda fountains. For example, an establishment which realizes an essentially constant but not excessively high demand upon its fountain facilities may desire the type of faucet shown in Figure 3 wherein uneven distribution of internal pressure is utilized to cause the valve to automatically close when released by the operator. 'On the other hand, many establishments cater to a predominantly rush hour trade, in which case a large demand must be served within the shortest pos-- sible time. For this class of establishment the type of faucet shown in Figure 1 may be best suited. In this instance the construction of the faucet is such that the valve will remain in the position set by the operator thus permitting the attendant to use both hands for rapid handling of glasses. Yet another form of dispensing faucet in common use today is the remotely operated type shown in Figure 2. This type of faucet is generally utilized in automatic coin-operated vending machines such as may be found in theater lobbies, factories, etc.

As will become apparent, the faucet of our invention is of such utilitarian design that the various components which comprise the three embodiments shown in the drawing, if not identical in each, are interchangeable with corresponding parts. Thus the manufacturing cost of our faucets is maintained at 'a minimum since our construction renders the various types of faucets available with a minimum variance in construction.

In reference now to Figure 1, the reference numeral l0 denotes a casing or body member which is generally cylindrical in shape and which is threaded at both ends at H and I2. An aperture i3 is provided in the side wall of the casing ID to receive an inlet fitting M which is rigidly secured to the casing in any suitable manner and which generally has provisions, not shown, at its outer end portion by which it may be secured to a dispensing cooler, also not shown. The inlet fitting I4 is provided with an axial bore l5 which connects the casing 10 with a pressurized source of beer, or other carbonated liquid, not shown. Secured to the lower end of the casing ID by means of threads I2 is a discharge nozzle i6 which has an outlet aperture ll disposed axially therein. A resilient gasket I8 is positioned between the casing I 0 and nozzle Hi to effectv a fluid tight seal therebetween. The bore I! in the nozzle I3 is enlarged slightly at I8 to snugly receive a discharge tube I9 which extends upwardly into the casing 10.

It is, of course, understood that the fluid which enters the inlet bore I is under a considerable pressure, as is necessary to properly retain sufficient carbonation. In order to prevent Spitting or spraying of the liquid from the valve, it is necessary to reduce the liquid pressure to substantially that of the atmosphere, to thus allow a gravity flow of the liquid from the faucet. To accomplish this reduction in pressure we provide a flow restricting member Zll which is in the form of an inverted cup and which is adapted to fit slidabl into said casing. Theupper-portion of the cup shaped restricting member 20 isprovided with a flange 2! which is adapted to. rest upon a shoulder 22 provided therefor in the casing l0 and thus serves to retain the member'2-6 in the. proper axial position. An annular recess 23,

provided in'the upper portion of the cup member 20 at a position substantially adjacent the inlet bore l5, permits fluid entering through the bore l5. to circulate freely around the cup 20.. In accordance with principles disclosed in our related U. S. Patent No. 2,331,527, we provide a slight clearance between the inner wall of the casing l0 and the periphery of the cup member 2% through. which the fluid must pass to be dis charged. This clearance is in the order of 0.010

to. 0.012v inchv and is operative to reduce the fluid pressure substantially to atmospheric as is re- .quired for effective operation. A plurality of circumferentially arranged spacers 24 are positioned about the periphery of the cup member 28 at its lower end and serve to retain the said member .20 in. concentric relation with the casing H To .securethe cup member 20 in position we provide a cap member 25 which is adapted to fit slidably into the casing lliandto. abut the upper end portion of the cup member Zllas shown. A key as is retained in the cap 25 and slidably engages a keyway 31 provided therefor in the-casing ill to insure proper alignment of the parts as may be de- .age of fluid upward around the cup member 2!! we have provided an O-ring. gasket. 38 which is retained between the cap 25 and the cup member 20 and is operative to effect a fluid seal atthe junction of the said parts 211 and 25 with the casing H1- The valving means of our faucet comprises an actuating shaft 28- which is adapted to,- retain a resilient washer 29 at. its lower end, and which is slidably retained in both the cap member 25 and cup member 20..., An O-ring gasket 39. is retained between the, members 20, and 25 and in contact with the shaft 28 to prevent. leakage of the. pressurized fluid. As shown, the washer 29 is apertured centrally and is retained in contact withthe shaft 28 by means of a flanged stud 30 whichengages mating threads in the. shaft 28. A tapering plug 3! extends downwardly from the stud 30 and into the discharge tube i9, for reasons, to be hereafter disclosed. As will be noted, movement of the shaft 28. is. operative to move the washer 29 into and, out of sealing contact with the end of the discharge tube 19.. To. accomplish this movement we provide an operating arm 32 which is pivotally mounted in a recessed portion of the cap member 25 by a pin 33. The in 335 is firmly retained at its extremities by the cap Extending inwardly from the lower end of the operating arm 32 is a bifurcated lifter as which straddles the shaft 28 near its upper end at 35, at which point the shaft has been sufficiently recessed to insure positive response to movement of the lifter 34 in either direction. It may be observed that no retaining devices are necessary to retain the shaft 28 at a set position; the slight friction between the shaft and the gasket 39 being ample to accomplish this. Further, closing of the valve causes the full fluid pressure to be exerted upon the upper side of the. Washer it to thus firmly retain it in the closed position to avoid dripping.

In the operation of our faucet the operating arm 32 is pulled downward to lift the washer from its seat 49 and thuspermit the flow of fluid. The fluid, entering through the bore 15,

flows through the restricted passage between the casing H3 and the cup 29 where it undergoes a substantial loss of pressure. After passing through the above mentioned clearance it is emitted at the lower end of the cup 20 and discharged intoa surge chamber space provided between the tube IS and the cup 2t. This space is norm-ally filled with liquid which is under no appreciable pressure when the valve 29 is open. Therefore any discharge velocity in the entering liquid is quietly killed. This is important since carbonated beverages readily lose this carbonation if agitated at low pressures and the .least turbulence-greatly increases the discharge of the dissolved gases.

Asis well known in-the art, there is a natural tendency for liquids discharged from a tube, as in the instant case, to form alow pressure air pocket at the point of discharge. This, further increases the carbonation loss and is thus undesirable. To avoid the formation of this air pocket we have provided the tapering plug 3| which displacesvthe air at the point of -formation and thus is operative to substantially preclude such. formation.

As: explained, closing of the valve by moving arm 32, to an upright position causes the full pressure of the liquid to be applied to the upper portionxof' the valve to thus exert a strong sealing force which is proportional to the pressure of the fluidretained. However, upon the valve being opened, such force is relieved and the valve is biased tov open position by such pressure as exists in the outflowing liquid. This, together with the friction of the stem 28 and the O-ring 39,:is sufficient to hold the valve in open position.

The embodiment of our invention shown in Figure 2 is of essentially the same structure as that shown in Figure I with alterations as will be disclosed below. Components which are identical in both embodiments will be denoted by corresponding reference numerals and will not be redescribed except as is required to support the additional disclosure.

Shown in Figure 2 is an embodiment of our invention which is particularly adapted for use in automatic vending machines and the like where remote control is desired. In this embodiment: the cap 25 is terminated at the flange 27' and functions merely to retain the cup 20 in position and toretain the O-rings 38 and 39. The actuating shaftv 28" is threaded at its upper endand retains at that point a-piston 40. Re-

*placing the collar nut of Figure 1 we have provided an internally flanged cylinder 4| which has an integral. nut 26 at its lower end, and as such functions to retain the cap 25 as well as -to enclose the piston 4|), as shown. A suitable fitting 42 is secured to a cylinder 4| at a point beneath the piston 40 and is connected to a source of air or gas pressure, not shown. A solenoid actuated valve 43, which is interpoed in the supply conduit 44, operates in response to the energization of solenoid-45 to apply pressure to the lower side of the piston 40 to thus open the -valve. It is presently common practice to utilize a suitable timing device, not shown, in the enerjgizing circuit so that the valve 43 will remain open for a predetermined length of time to allow :3, likewise predetermined volume of liquid to be dispensed. In order to return the valve to a closed position after deenergization of the solenoid 45 we provide a compressible coil spring 46 which is retained in engagement with the upper side of the piston 40 by means of a cover piece 41. The cover piece 41 is retained in threaded engagement with upper end of the cylinder 4| as shown. The embodiment of our invention shown in Figure 3 employs a principle of operation which features automatic closing of the valve after release of the operating arm 32. In this embodiment the shaft 28" and the cup 20 are integral and move together with the washer 29 to open -or close the valve in response to movement of the arm 32. As will be understood, the large drop in fluid pressure through the clearance provided between the casing H1 and cup 20 causes a subbe rendered automatic in operation by substitution of the piston or cylinder arrangement shown in Figure 2 for the operating arm of Figures 1 and 3. Thus it should be apparent that costs of manufacturing may be greatly reduced since many major parts are common to the three embodiments. It may be noted also that with but few minor exceptionsrall machinery operations required in the manufacture of our faucets may be accomplished with a lathe and drill press. The manufacture of our faucets, then, may be accomplished by relatively unskilled operators, and does not require the services of skilled machinists.

It should be understood, however, that the embodiments of our invention herein shown and stantial difierential in force applied by the liquid to the cup. The force applied to the upper side, being the larger, causes the valve to close immediately upon release of the arm 32. In order to'effect a seal between the casing H1 and the cap we provide an apertured disc 2| which corresponds to the flange 2| of the cup 20 utilized in the embodiment shown in Figure l.

The embodiments of our dispensing faucet shown in Figures 1 and 2 are so constructed that the flow restricting cup 20 is permanently positioned while the valving element alone is opera.- 'tive to move to effect control of the liquid flow, the construction being such that liquid flowing through the faucet exerts substantially no force upon the valving member, and thus exhibits no tendency to open or close the valve. Further, the construction of our faucet is such that it may be easily and quickly assembled and disassem- -bled without the aid of tools. Thus the fountain attendant, though unskilled in the art, may easily perform such repairs and cleaning operations as become necessary from time to time. This is of considerable importance since the syrup base used in most carbonated soft drinks .is apt to congeal within the faucet and it may well be understood that over a relatively short period of time a valve may become extremely sticky and thus fail to function properly. By providing a construction which so facilitates cleaning of the faucet that little time and no tools are required we have rendered the task one of such insignificance that it is much less likely to be neglected.

Our general construction is also of extreme versatility as may be noted from the drawing alone. With but few minor alterations in parts the faucet of Figure 1 may be transformed intothe prior type, self-closing embodiment shown in Figure 3. Further, either of these types may specifically described are intended to be illustrative only since obvious alterations may be made therein without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Reference should therefore be had to the appended claims in determining the true scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a liquid dispensing faucet an upstanding cylindrical casing having an enlarged bore extending vertically therethrough and an inlet aperture in its side wall; an outlet nozzle carried by said casing at its lower end; a discharge tube retained in said nozzle and extending upwardly into said casing; a cup member adapted to be slidably assembled within said casing and positioned over said discharge tube, the arrangement being such a relatively restricted fluid passage, communicating with said inlet aperture, is formed between said casing and said cup and a relatively unrestricted surge chamber, communicating with said restricted passage and said discharge tube, is formed between said cup and said tube; a cap member adapted to fit slidably into said casing and having an outwardly extending flange adapted to overlie the upper end portion of said casing, said cap member having a centrally positioned axial bore; a nut adapted to screw-threadedly engage the upper end of said casing and to engage the flange of said cap member to thereby retain said cap member in said casing; a shaft slidably retained in the said bore in said cap member and extending downwardly toward said tube; a resilient washer secured to the lower end of said shaft and adapted to sealingly engage the upper end of said discharge tube; a tapered plug carried by the lower end of said shaft and extending downwardly into said discharge tube; and means to slide said shaft upwardly and downwardly to thereby move said washer into and out of sealing engagement with said discharge tube.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 further characterized by said shaft moving means comprising an operating arm pivotally mounted in said cap member and a lifter rigidly extending from said operating arm and engaging said shaft, said lifter being adapted to move said shaft in response to movement of said operating arm.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1 further characterized by said shaft moving means comprising a cylinder extending integrally upward from said nut; a piston slidable in said cylinder, said piston being secured to said shaft; conduit means connecting said cylinder with a source of fluid pressure, valve means interposed in said conduit to control the application of fluid pressure to said cylinder, the arrangement being such that application of said fluid pressure to said cylinder will cause said piston to move in one di- 7 rection; and biasing means operative to move said piston in the other direction upon the: release of fluid pressure from said cylinder.

4. In a liquid dispensing faucet an upstanding cylindrical casing having an enlarged bore extending vertically therethrough and an inlet aperture in its side wall, an outlet nozzle carried by the lower end of said casing, a discharge tube retained in said nozzle and extending upwardly into said casing in concentric relation thereto, a cup member adapted to be slidably assembled into said casing and to be positioned over said tube; the arrangement being such that a relatively restricted fluid passage, communicating with said inlet aperture, is formed between said casing and said cup, and a relatively unrestricted surge chamber, communicating with said restricted passage and said discharge tube, is formed between said cup and said tube, said cup member having a flange at its upper end adapted to engage a shoulder provided therefor in said casing to thereby insure positive axial positioning of said cup member; a cap member adapted to fit slidably into said casing and to abut the upper end portion of said cup member, said cap having a fiange'adapted to overlie the upper end of said casing; a nut adapted to screw-threadedly engage the upper end of said casing and to en gage said last mentioned flange to thereby firmly retain said cap member and said cup member in position; a shaft slidably retained in said cap member and said cup member; a resilient washer carried by the lower end of said shaft and adapted to sealingly engage the upper end of said discharge tube; a tapered plug carried by the lower end of said shaft and extending downwardly therefrom into said discharge tube; and means associated with the upper'end of said shaft operative to move said shaft axially and hence move said washer into and out of fluid sealing engagement with said discharge tube.

5. In a liquid dispensing faucet an upstanding cylindrical casing having an enlarged bore extending vertically therethrough and an inlet aperture in its side wall; an outlet nozzle carried by the lower end of said casing; a discharge tube retained by said nozzle and extending upwardly into said casing in concentric relation thereto; a cup member adapted to be slidably retained within said casing and over said discharge tube, the arrangement being such that a relatively restricted passage, communicating with said inlet aperture, is formed between said casing and said cup, and a relatively unrestricted surge chamber, communicating with said restricted passage and said discharge tube, is formed between said cup and said discharge tube; a washer carried by the upper or closed end of said cup and adapted to sealingly engage the end of said discharge tube; a tapered plug carried by the end of said shaft and extending downwardly into said tube; a

shaft extending integrally upward from said cup; an apertured disc slidably received within said casing and over said shaft and adapted to engage a shoulder provided therefor in said casing; a cap member adapted to be slidably received within said casing and over said shaft, and adapted to abut said disc, said cap member having a flange adapted to overlie the upper end portion of said casing; a nut adapted to screwthreadedly engage the upper portion of said casing and to engage said flange to thereby firmly retain said cap and said disc in position; and means positioned in said cap and associated with the upper end of said shaft to effect vertical movement of said shaft and said cup whereby said washer is moved into and out of fluid seal"- ing engagement with said discharge tube 6. In a liquid dispensing faucet an upstanding cylindrical casing having an enlarged bore ex tending vertically therethrough and an inlet aperture in its side wall; an outlet nozzle carried by the lower end of said casing; a discharge tube retained by said outlet nozzle and extending upwardly into said casing; a cup member adapted to be slidably assembled into saidcasing and over said tube, the arrangement being such-that a relatively restricted passage, communicating with said inlet aperture, is formed between said casing and said cup, and a relatively unrestricted surge chamber, communicating With said restricted passage and said discharge tube, is formed between said cup and said tube; a cap member slidably received in said casing and adapted to abut the upper end of said cup member; detachable means to retain said cap member in aforesaid relation; a shaft slidably received in said cap memberan'd said cup member and extending downwardly toward said tube; a resilient washer carried by the end of said shaft and adapted to sealingly engage saidtube; means associated with the upper end of said shaft to impart vertical motion thereto whereby said washer may be moved into and out of fluid sealing contact with said tube.

7. In a liquid dispensing faucet a cylindrical casing having an enlarged bore extending vertically therethrough and an inlet aperture; an outlet nozzle carried by the lower end of said casing; a discharge tube retained in said nozzle and extending upwardly into said casing; a cup member adapted to be slidably assembled into said casing and adapted to fit over said tube, the arrangement being such that a relatively-restricted passage, communicating with said inlet aperture, is formed between said casing and said cup, and a relatively unrestricted surge chamber, communicating with said restricted passage and said discharge tube, is formed between saidcup and said tube; means to retain said cup'in said thus assembled position; a shaft slidably received in said cup member and extending downwardly toward the said tube; a resilient washer carried by said shaft and adapted to sealingly engage said tube; and means associated with said shaft to impart vertical motion thereto whereby said washer may be moved into and out of fluid sealing contact with said tube.

8. In a faucet for dispensing carbonated beverages and the like the combination of a casing having a vertically extending bore therein and an inlet aperture in the side wall thereof communicating with said bore, an inverted cuplilre member received and normally fixed in said bore and having a depending cylindrical wall positioned closely adjacent but spaced from the inner surface of the bore below said aperture to provide a relatively restricted passage for liquid to be dispensed, said cup being circumferentially recessed to provide for the circumferential distribution of liquid received through said inlet aperture to said restricted passage, means positioned above said inlet aperture to seal the upper end of said cup-like member in said bore against the leakage of fluid, and means to discharge liquid from the space within said cup-like member, said last mentioned means including a valve to control the discharge of liquid from said space, said valve being positioned within'said space and being movable independently of said cup-like member.

9. In a faucet for dispensing carbonated beverages and the like the combination of a casing having a vertically extending bore therein and an inlet aperture in the side wall thereof communicating with said bore, an inverted cuplike member received and normally fixed in said bore and having a depending cylindrical wall positioned closely adjacent but spaced from the inner surface of the bore below said aperture to provide a relatively restricted passage for liquid to be dispensed, said cup being circumferentially recessed to provide for the circumferential distribution of liquid received through said inlet aperture to said restricted passage, means positioned above said inlet aperture to seal the upper end of References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Smith Mar. 24, 1936 Welty et al. Oct. 12, 1943 Number

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2035202 *Jul 12, 1934Mar 24, 1936Smith Welding Equipment CorpBeverage dispensing faucet
US2331527 *Jun 3, 1941Oct 12, 1943Welty Frank BFaucet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3834662 *May 31, 1972Sep 10, 1974American Air Filter CoDamper
US5410888 *Dec 1, 1993May 2, 1995Food Systems Partnership, Ltd.Dispenser for soft-serve frozen dessert machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/30.1, 251/120, 251/237
International ClassificationF16K31/122, F16K31/52, F16K31/524
Cooperative ClassificationF16K31/5245, F16K31/1221
European ClassificationF16K31/524B6, F16K31/122B