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Publication numberUS2653552 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1953
Filing dateAug 15, 1951
Priority dateAug 15, 1951
Publication numberUS 2653552 A, US 2653552A, US-A-2653552, US2653552 A, US2653552A
InventorsJean Geeraet Leon
Original AssigneeGeeraert Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High-pressure pump
US 2653552 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 29, 1953 l.. J. GEERAERT 2,653,552

HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP Filed Aug. 15, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet l JAM n 39/ 4 BY A Mam

SePt- 29, 1953 L. J. GEERAERT 2,653,552

HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP l Filed Aug. l5, 1951 8 SheeS-Shee 2 Sept. 29, 1953 J. GEERAl-:RT

HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 15, 1951 sept. 29, 1953 L. J. GEERAERT HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Sept. 29, 1953 L. J. GEERAERT 2,653,552

HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP Filed Aug. l5, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Sept. 29, 1953 L. .1. GEERAERT 2,653,552

HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP Filed Aug. l5, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Sept. 29, 1953 J. GEERAERT HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Aug. l5, 1951 Sept. 29, 1953 l.. J. GEERAERT HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP Filed Aug. l5, 1951 fai M5 iii:

Sheets-Sheet 8 BYMG Patented Sept. 29, 1953 HIGH-PRESSURE PUMP Leon Jean Geeraerts, Brooklyn, N. Y., assigner to The Geeraert Corporation, New York, N. Y., a

corporation of New York Application August 15, 1951, Serial No. A241,925

(Cl. 10S- 152) 16 Claims. l

The invention relates in general to fluid pumps and has for its principal object the provision of a high pressure pump applicable to various arts and industries but especially suited for use in pumping propellant-chemicals employed in the propulsion of rockets, guided missiles and aircraft, and for the operational discharge of namethrower fuel.

In the propulsion of rockets, for example, use is made of fuming nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, liquid oxygen, fluorine, high-test gasoline, 'alcohol, ammonia and sulphuric acid, which must be pumped at high delivery pressure with continuous, 'non-pulsating flow, and must not be exposed to the atmosphere either `within the pump itself or anywhere in the conduction system. vHigh pressure, non-pulsating discharge is particularly important in flame-'thrower Operation. A further complicating condition is the fact that some of the fluids in the above list cannot be pumped safely with conventional pumps of the reciprocating piston or rotary types wherein the fluid being pumped comes into contact with frictional surfaces of piston and cylinder, due to the danger of corrosion.

In the accomplishment of Ymy primary object, I have made use of the fundamental principle of the iiexible Wall or diaphragm pump and have improved upon known pumps of this type by devising means for attaining suiiiciently high pressure delivery and continuity of flow to meet all the exacting requirements which cannot be avoided when pumping propellant-chemicals and flame-thrower fuel, and to vrender the improved pump otherwise widely useful.

A further object of the invention is to provide a flexible wall pump for the intended purpose which is very compact in structure `and possesses a minimum number of operating parts and yet is capable of pumping vat high volumetric output capacity.

Another object is to provide a composite pump including a plurality of exible wall units wherein the primary and 'secondary control valves for the respective units are 'so interlocked for synchronized sequential operation of the lsaid units and actuated in direct response to flexible wall action that a high degree of pumping emciency is Aattained.

A still further object is to provide a pile yor f ganization of individual flexible wall units arranged in-line, wherein the respective units are of `interchangeable construction and are separably united in assembled relation in such a manner and by ysuol-1 `means that the number fof -units 2 necessary to aiford a required volumetric output capacity may be assembled originally and then desired .changes in capacity may be effected readily by simply adding or substracting units.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent as the following speciiic description is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, 'in which:

Fig. l is a partially diagrammatic cross-sectional view of a simplied form of diaphragm ypumping unit constructed in accordance with the invention and having all-electric valve operating means, showing the flexible diaphragm midway 'between the limits of a suction stroke; and, Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the midpoint of a pressure stroke.

Fig. 3 is asimilar view of a pair of diaphragm pumping units of the same nature as that shown singly in Figs. l and 2 arranged abreast and representing the midpoints of ya suction stroke in one unit and of a pressure stroke in the other; and, Fig. 4 is a similar view but showing reversal of strokes in the respective units.

Fig. 5 is a partially diagrammatic cross-sectional view of a modified form of double unit having long-thrust diaphragms and electrically actuated hydraulic pilot valves for operating the control valves, showing lthe midpoints of a suction stroke in one unit 'and of a pressure stroke in the other; and, Fig. -6- is a similar View representing the reverse operational condition. y

Fig. 7 is an end elevation of a short-thrust, multiple pile pump wherein a plurality of individual `diaphragm Apumping units are arranged in vaxial alignment; Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the same; and, Fig. 9 is an exploded fragmentary side elevation thereof.

Fig. l0 is a partially diagrammatic horizontal cross-'sectional 'view of a multiple pile pump of Athe type illustrated in Figs. 7 to 9 but composed of only two piles of two diaphragm pumping units each, showing the pump in operation with one pile latvthe end of a suction stroke and the other at the end of a pressure stroke; and, Fig. l1 is a similar view showing the reverse `operational condition.

Fig. '12 isa large-scale axial cross-section view of a single diaphragm pumping unit of the shortthrust form illustrated in Figs. 7 to ll, wherein a biasing and reinforcing spring is Vapplied to the diaphragm thereof; Fig. 1'3 is a fragmentary exploded view of the unit; and, Fig. .14 is a fragmentary perspective View of diaphragm and spring alone.

Fig. '15 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevad tion of the multiple pile cylinder of Figs. 7, 8, l and l1, partly broken away and in section to show portions or the various casing sections and other related elements in elevation; and, Fig, 16 is a similar view showing particularly the inner face of one of the casing sections.

Fig. 17 is a detail view in axial vertical crosssection of the ilexible wall pumping units alone of a double-unit pump wherein the flexible wall is in the form of an elastic thmble-like tube closed at one end, showing the lethand unit at the start of a pressure stroke and the righthand unit at the start of a suction stroke; Fig. 18 is a similar view showing the lethand and righthand units respectively substantially midway during their pressure and suction strokes; and Fig. 19 is a similar view Showing the lefthand and righthand units at the end of their respective pressure and suction strokes.

Fig. 20 is a vertical axial cross-sectional view oi' a complete double-unit pump embodying the elastic tube form of exible wall but in a modified form, showing the leithand unit approaching the end of a pressure stroke and the righthand unit at the completed end ci a suction stroke; Fig. 2l is a similar view showing the lefthand unit at the end of a suction stroke and the righthand unit approaching the end of a pressure stroke; Fig. 22 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on line Z2-22 in Fig. 20; Fig. 23 is an enlarged detail fragmentary view, partly in vertical section, oi the upper end of one of the units at the end of a pressure stroke; and., Fig. 24 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in vertical section, of the control valve to show the dwell latch in detail.

Fig. 25 is a horizontal cross-sectional view similar to vdig. 22 of a quadruple unit pump of the same type as that shown in Figs. 2o to 2e, inclusive.

Before proceeding with detailed description of my improved pump, it will be reiterated that, while the developed pump has wide general application in the arts and industries, I was eX- pressly seeking to devise a pump especially suited for use with propellant-chemicals and flamethrower fuel for military purposes. Therefore, some of the exacting operational requirements eculiar to the specific employment I had in mind will be more explicitly enumerated. For instance, the pressure on the iiuid in the tank of origin from which it is to be pumped to another tank or other point of destination must not exceed that or the atmosphere (14.7 p. s. i. at sea level). 'in other words, pressurizing the tank of origin is forbidden. Furthermore, gauge pressure at the discharge side of the pump must be at leasty 100 p. s. i., and the condition of iiow through the pump and all chambers or channels of the conduction system from tank of origin to point oi destination must be such that cavitation and the resultant danger of vapor-lock are avoided.

As previously stated, l have chosen to adapt the fundamental principle of the iiexible wall pump to my purpose, one reason being that in such a pump there is no communication between the :duid being pumped and the driving iluid in the primary circulation system, whereby it is practicable to maintain the entire secondary conduction system for the propellant-chemicals and the like closed to the atmosphere.

rihe Vabove-mentioned and other advantages of the ilexible wall pump principle for my purpose should be fully appreciated upon consideration ci the simple one-diaphragm pump unit constructed in accordance with the invention which is illustrated in Figs. l and 2 of the drawings. With the understanding that like reference charac ers indicate corresponding parts in the several views, the numeral il@ designates the pump casing, which is composed of two substantially identical circular dished sections 3l and 32 arranged to present their concave faces toward each other to form opposed working chambers 3S and 35, re.- spectively, separated in a huid-tight manner by flexible wall 35, which in this instance is a diaphragm. The flexible wall or diaphragm is marginally clamped between the peripheral portions of casing sections 3 i-SZ and is represented as being annularly corrugate in form and at the midpoint of its travel.

By using a separable iiexible wall or diaphragm, it is practicable to make the said wall of a plastic or other specific material which will not be corroded or otherwise affected adversely by any particular` propellant-chemical iluid. like manner, the secondary section of the pump casing and all iluid conduits in the secondary conduction system may be made of stainless steel or other metals inert to the propellant-chemicals, whereas cast iron or other less expensive metals may be used in fabrication of all iluid conducting parts of the primary circulation system and the primary casing section.

Casing sections 3i and 32, respectively, are provided with two-way ports 35 and 3l communieating with the respective working chambers 33 and These ports preferably are axially disposed therefore in alignment. Control valves for ports 5d and 3l, respectively, are indicated at and te. The respective casings ed and il of control valves 3S and 3i? preferably are formed integral with pump casing sections 3l and and have internal cylindrical chambers l2 and [i3 in which valve plungers [le and il, respectively, are slidable longitudinally. For reasons which will appear presently, it is preferred to arrange valve chambers s2 and d3 in axial parallelism.

n the outer portion of valve casing il oi control valve 38 there are two ports il@ and el, which may be V.termed pressure and suction ports respectively because they are intended to be connected as shown with the respective pressure and suction lines 'l and ed o a suitable primary circulation system (not shown) that generates power to drive the pump diaphragm 35. lt is not considered to be necessary to disclose details or" the said primary circulation system, for

the reason that am not claiming anything new in that system. Any conventional primary sys- .tem with its prime mover (not shown) for generating pressure and suction conditions in the respective lines d@ and it will serve my purpose.

Valve plunger d@ of control valve has an annular peripheral channel 5t which is or" such axial width and disposition that, when the plunger is in its righthand position shown in Fig. l, it will span ports l? and 55, and, when in its lefthand position'(Fig. 2) will span ports and dwhereby two-way port tt may be connected selectively .by longitudinal shifting oi valve plunger ifi with either pressure port or suction port fil.

Casing li of control valve Se also has two ports 5i and 52 which are intended to -be connected as shown with intake line I and delivery line D of the secondary conduction system (not shown) that leads from the tank of origin (not shown) to the pump and thence to a point of destination (not shown). Valve plunger 65 also has an annular peripheral channel 53 of Vsuch axial width and disposition that, when said plunger is in its lefthand position shown in Fig. 1, it Will span ports l and 31, and, when in its righthand position (Fig. 2), will span ports 52 and 31, whereby two-way port 31 may be connected selectively by longitudinal shifting of valve plunger 45 with either intake port 5l or delivery port 52.

The respective plungers 44 and 45 of control valves 33 and 33 are shifted longitudinally by solenoids 5ft and 55, beth of which have their iield coils connected in each of two parallel electric circuits. The ield coil of one solenoid is wound oppositely to that of the other solenoid so that both solenoids will operate in opposite directions to move the valve plungers correspondingly whenever current is caused to `flow through either of said parallel circuits. YThe polarity of the two parallel circuits 'is controlled by reversing micro-switches of standard type A56 and 51. In other words, when micro-switch 51 is closed, as shown in Fig. l, solenoid 54 will be energized in a manner which will shift plunger 44 of control valve 38 to the righthand limit of its path of shifting movement, whereas simu-ltaneous energization of solenoid 55 will shift plunger 35 of control valve 33 in the opposite direction. Conversely, closing of reversing microswitch 55, as shown in Fig. 2, to reverse the polarity of current ilowing through both solenoid held coils will shift the plungers of both control valves in reverse directions to correspondingly change the direction of flow of iluids through said valves. It is to be understood, however, that the specific electric circuits represented in Figs. l and 2 are purely illustrative. Some other circuit arrangement may be employed provided that the solenoids shift the respective control valve plungers in opposite directions alternately when the micro-switches are triggered into circuit closing condition.

At this juncture, it may be appropriate to dene some constantly recurring terms used in the speciiication and claims. For instance, the power imparting or driving fluid in the primary circulation system will consistently be called the primary fluid, regardless of its specific nature. Similarly, the propellant-chemical or other iluid to be pumped through the secondary conduction system will be known as the secondary uid. For the same reason, working chambers 33 and 34 of the pump will be called, respectively, the primary working chamber and the secondary working chamber, and control valves 33 and 39 will be termed the primary -control valve and the secondary control valve, respectively.

In this one-diaphragm embodiment of the invention, micro-switches 56 and 51 are triggered for automatic sequential shifting of the plungers of the primary and secondary control valves in opposite directions at the completion of each diaphragm stroke by means responsive to working chamber pressure. For this purpose, `each microswitch has a pressure-sensitive plunger or piston which is exposed to fluid pressure in the corresponding working chamber of the pump. For this purpose, the pressure-sensitive plunger '55 of micro-switch 53 is located for longitudinal reoiprocation in fluid duct 58 which communicates with the interior of primary working chamber 33 in the vicinity of port 35. Similarly, the pressure-sensitive plunger 51' of micro-switch 51 is located for reciprocation in fluid duct 53 which communicates with the interior of secondary working chamber 34 vclose to port .31. Microswitch 55 is constructed and adjusted to be trig- 6. gered into close condition when the pressure in primary chamber 33 reaches a predetermined degree at the end of each upward suction stroke of diaphragm 35, whereas micro-switch 51 is constructed and adjusted to be triggered when the pressure in secondary working chamber 34 reaches a predetermined degree at the end of each vdownward pressure stroke.

The operation of the one-diaphragm unit should be understood upon further reference to Figs. 1 and 2. Assuming that the primary and secondary control valves 38 and 39 Were shifted into the positions shown in Fig. 1 by reversal of the solenoid circuits as a result of automatic triggering of micro-switch 51 at the end of a preceding downward primary pressure stroke, primary working chamber 33 will have been opened to suction line 45 or" the primary circulation system. This action permitted low pressure primary fluid to exert a suction edect on primary working chamber 33 and thereby commence to draw diaphragm 35 on its upward suction stroke. Fig. 1 shows diaphragm 35 at the mid-point of Vits travel in that direction. During this suction stroke, secondary fluid will be drawn into secondary working chamber 34 from secondary intake line I. At the end of the suction stroke just described, micro-switch 53 will be triggered automatically to cause reversal of current in solenoids 54 and 55, thereby shifting the plungers of primary and secondary control valves 38 and 39 into the positions represented in Fig. 2. As a result of this valve action, movement of secondary fluid from intake line I into secondary working chamber 34 will have been checked and said secondary working chamber will have been opened to secondary delivery line D as indicated. Simultaneously, primary working chamber 33 will have been opened to primary pressure line 48 to permit entry of primary liuid under high pressure. his action will cause diaphragm 35 to be thrust downward and thereby force secondary iluid from secondary working chamber 34 into secondary delivery line D at high pressure. Fig. 2 shows diaphragm 35 at the midpoint of this downward travel.

When diaphragm 35 again reaches the down- Ward limit of its travel in a pressure stroke, the two-stroke cycle of the pumping action will have been completed.

In the simplied, one-diaphragm unit just described, delivery or" secondary iluid through line D will be intermittent, there being suspension of ilow in the delivery line throughout each suction stroke.

Referring now in detail to Figs. 3 and e, continuous, non-pulsating flow in the delivery line has been achieved by virtually combining two of the simple pump units illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 for coordinated operation through interlocking of the respective primary and secondary control valves thereof for sequential reciprocation of their plural diaphragms in opposite directions in a distinctly improved embodiment ci the invention. It is as if the unit shown in Fig. 1 were used in the same position as lefthand unit A in Figs. 3 and 4, and as if the unit in Fig. 2 were reversed end for end horizontally and put in the position of righthand unit B in Figs. 3 and fl. The same reference characters for corresponding parts have been retained, except that the letters a and b have been anixed to denote location in either unit A or unit B, respectively.

In order to eiect the desired interlocking Voperation of the control valves, plungers .14a-44h acaassc of primary control valves 38m-38h have been rigidly united for conjoined movement by connecting rod t0, and plungers 5a-5b of secondary control valves 35m-39h are similarly united by connecting rod 6I. The desirability of arranging the working chambers of the control valves in parallelism should now be apparent. As a result, connecting rods (it and 6l are free to reciprocate side by side in opposite directions when actuated by solenoids Elia-56ha--b in the manner which will be described presently in relation to the operation of the pump. In this instance, solenoids Go-55h are electrically connected in series in one circuit and solenoids 55u-Elib are in series in another circuit, the two circuits preferably being in parallel. There are only two micro-switches for the entire two-unit pump and, in this instance, both are triggered by predetermined pressure conditions in the secondary working chambers 33o-33h only at the ends of the respective pressure strokes, which is a distinct advantage under some pumping' conditions because valve shifting cannot take place before complete evacuation oi secondary nuid. However, in certain situations, synchronization of motion oi the two diaphragms may not be obtained, thereby necessitating the use of micro-switches in the primary chambers as well as in the secondary chambers, in which oase both switches for each unit would be electrically connected in series to avoid low volumetric efficiency.

Operation of the double-unit pump disclosed in Figs. 3 and fi will now be described. Referring iirst to Fig. 3, it will be observed that diaphragm 35a oi the leithand unit A is at the midpoint ci its upward suction stroke while secondary fluid is being drawn from secondary intake line I, whereas diaphragm iib of righthand unit B is midway in its downward pressure stroke in which secondary i'iuid is being forced into secondary delivery line D. When diaphragm 35h of unit B reaches the end oi its downward pressure stroke, the pressure in duct 59h will have'attained the predetermined degree for triggering of micro-switch all). When this occurs, the electric circuit of solenoids and 55h will be closed (indicated by heavy circuit lines in Fig. 3) to cause valve plungers ida-db and @5a-45h to be shifted simultaneously in opposite directions into the dwell positions shown in Fig. 4. Immediately upon reversal of the control valves at the end oi the pressure stroke in unit B, unit A will commence instantly to force into secondary delivery line D the increment of secondary iiuid that was drawn into working chamber 3ds. during the preceding suction stroke. Simultaneously, unit B will be undergoing a suction stroke. Now, when diaphragm of unit A completes its upward pressure stroke, the pressure in duct 58a will have attained the predetermined degree for triggering of micro-switch When this occurs, the electric circuit of solenoids 55a and 'Eib will be closed (heavy circuit lines in Fig. e)

to cause valve plungers ddd-itil? and @5a-35h `to be shifted reversely into the dwell positions shown in 3, thus completing the cycle o1" operation. t should be obvious that in this doubleunit pump there will be uninterrupted, nonpulsating now of secondary fluid in the delivery line as compared with the pumping action oi the single unit disclosed in Figs. 1 and 2.

n Figs. 5 and 5, there is illustrated a doubieunit pump of modiiied construction. This embodiment of the invention differs from that disclosed in Figs. 3 and 4 principally in the form and size of each pump casing and the flexible walls therein, the increased length of stroke and proportionately greater displacement, the substitution of duid-pressure for solenoid action as the direct actuating means for the control valves, and the use of mechanical diaphragm-contacting trigger devices.

The casing sections Si-i?. of both units A and B are bell-shaped and the flexible walls or diaphragms 35-35 are of similar shape, whereby long-stroke, high-displacement pumping action is achieved. The control valves '3s-39 are identical in construction and arrangement with those in the Figs. 3 and 4 embodiment, but their plungers lida-b-lla--iitb are not amxed to the solenoid cores. Instead, the cores of the primary solenoids Ella and 5th of the respective units A and B are affixed to pilot valve plungers 52a and 62h respectively, which operate reciprocatingly in valve sleeves 53a and 63h located across the outer ends of valve cylinders lilo and @9b and constituting cylinder heads therefor. Similarly, the cores of secondary solenoids 55a and 55h of the respective units A and B are affixed to pilot valve plungers ttc and @tb respectively, which are adapted to reciprocate in valve sleeves 65a and 65h located across the outer ends of valve cylinders da and lib and constituting cylinder heads therefor. Each valve sleeve 553e- Bb--Stic-i has two axially spaced diametrical ports 66 and 6l which pierce the inner and outer walls oi the respective sleeves'in axial registration with the respectively adjacent outer ends or" the corresponding working chambers of the control valves 38-39. Each of the valve plungersV ta-tb-Sflc-tdb has a diametrical port t8 which is adapted to register with and interconnec-t the inner and outer wall portions of port t6 when the said valve plunger is in its elevated position and to register with and interconnect the inner and outer wall portions of the other port el when the plunger is in its outwardly projected position. Valve plungers 52m-62tlla-S-b gravitate into their depressed positions when the fields coils oi solenoids 5ta and 5% become de-energized, whereas energization of said solenoids serves to raise the respective valve plungers to their elevated positions.

Due to the modiiication just described, plungers iria-lib and lea- 3513 of the respective control valves Sta- Stb and Sta-39o have also ecome pistons which may utilize the motive power oi primary fluid in primary pressure and suction lines 38 and il as means for causing their op-V erative reciprocation in the performance of their original control functions in relation to ports f-i-St and ports 5i-52-3. Shifting oi the piston-plungers itatrib and 5a-i519 back and forth in opposite directions in interlocked relation through utilization of the Vprimary uid is now under the control oi pilot valves 6ta., till?, les and 7th, of which: valve 59a is constituted by parts a--aMa-la-Sc operated by solenoid 5ta; valve 59o is constituted by parts E2b--3b--Sfb-'e'b-5b operated by solenoid Elib; valve 'lea is constituted by parts Staetce- SSaf--tlc-a operated by solenoid 55a; and valve leb is constituted by parts Sb-55h- ESb-lZi--tb operated by solenoid 55h.

In order to connect the respective pilot valves of unit A with primary fluid, ports 5ta-eta of Y Vports Sla-Sla of said valves are connected direct to primary suction line 49 by duct forming means lla. Similarly in pump unit B, ports 66b-66b of pilot valves E911-'ith are connected direct to primary suction line 49 by duct forming means 1lb, and ports Bib-67h of said valves are connected direct to primary pressure line 48 by duct forming means 12b.

While in the diagrammatic representation of Figs. 5 and 6 the duct forming means Ha-Ua* 1lb-12b is in the nature of external tubing, it

is within the scope of the invention to substitute internal ducts cast or drilled in the pump casing.

Synchronized triggering of the pilot valves of pump units A and B, respectively, is accomplished automatically by micro-switches 73o and which are installed in the outer end portions of working chambers 34a-34h and have springretracted (opening) pushbuttons 14a- 1th, respectively, which normally project into the interior of said chambers in the path or said flexible walls when the switches are open. Contact of the flexible wall of one of the units with the corresponding pushbutton at the end of its pressure stroke will serve to close the micro-switch of which said pushbutton forms a part. Thereafter, movement of the flexible wall in reverse direction (suction stroke) will permit the switch to open automatically through spring action. Micro-switch 13a serves to open and close parallel electric circuits 15 and T6 which are energized by battery 11 or other suitable source of current. The iield coils of solenoids 5th and 55a are connected in circuits 15 an-d 16, respectively. On the other hand, micro-switch 13b serves to open and close parallel electric circuits i8 and 'I9 which also are energized by source T1. The field coils of solenoids 54a and 55h are connected in circuits 18 and 19, respectively.

.Although counteracting fluid pressures will tend to secure the piston-plungers of the respective control valves in their dilerent dwell positions assumed at the end of each pressure stroke, it is desirable to supplement the pressure means by more positive mechanical means. Any suitable latch means may be adopted for this purpose, but I have shown, for purposes of illustration, the simple spring-urged detente 8u and 8| which enter the alternative notches 82 and 33 provided in connecting rods 6G and 65, re-

spectively. These dwell latches, as they may be termed, will become disengaged readily when the valve piston-plungers are subjected to pressures of primary uuid in the same direction through operation of the appropriate pilot valves.

The operation of the modified pump will now be described. Whereas plungers i32a--2b--5!la,-u 54h of the respective pilot valves 89a-69b- 10u-lh are all in their depressed positions throughout almost the entire period of each stroke of the pump, they will be operated selectively appropriate times during each operational cycle. Assuming now that flexible wall 35a of unit has just completed its downward pressure stroke at the end of a cycle, contact of the said exible wall with plunger '14a of micro-switch 'i3d will have triggered pilot valves 69h and 'ma by closing the circuits of solenoids 54h and 55a, respectively. Triggering of pilot valves 69h and ma causes plungers 62h and 64a, respectively thereof to be thrust into their elevated positions shown in Fig. 5. When this happens, the left end of chamber 43a of control valve 39a is opened through ports 66-68 and duct forming means 'Ha to primary suction line 4.9, which will cause coupled ccntrol valve piston-plungers o- 45h to shift to the lefthand dwell position shown. There will be no hydraulic resistance to this movement because the outer (right) end of chamber 43h of control valve 39h will still be open to communication with primary pressure line 48 as shown. At the same time, the right end of chamber 42h of control valve 38h will be opened through ports 66-68 and duct forming means Hb with primary suction line 49. Since the left end of chamber 42a of control valve 38a is still in communication with primary pressure line 48, the desired shifting of coupled control valve piston-plungers 54a and 44h to the righthand dwell position shown will occur.

It is not so shown in Fig. 5, but plungers B2b and 64a of pilot valves 691i and 10a will have gravitated into their depressed positions just as soon as the pushbutton 14a of micro-switch 13a has been released by exible wall 35a at the start of its upward suction stroke toward the midposition actually shown. 'Upon return of plungers 62h and 64a of pilot valves 69h and '10a to their depressed positions (not shown), the right end of chamber 42h of control valve 38h and the left end 0f chamber 43a of control valve 39a will both be opened to primary pressure line 48, but the pressure thereof will be balanced by the same pressure to which the opposite ends of pistonplungers 44a and 45h of control valves 38a and 39h, respectively, are subjected because pilot valves 69a and '10b are always open to pressure when their plungers are depresse-d. In fact, all pilot valves are open to pressure when their plungers are depressed and open to suction when their plungers are elevated through energization of their respective solenoids.

At the end of the rst stroke of the pumping cycle under consideration, flexible wall 35D will have closed micro-switch '13b to energize solenoids 540J and h and thereby open the left end of chamber 42a and the right end of chamber 43h to primary suction, as shown in Fig. 6, which will cause coupled control valve piston-plungers 44a-44h to shift to the lefthand dwell position shown in Fig. 6 and the coupled control valve piston-plungers 45u-45h to shift in the opposite direction to the righthand dwell position shown. Of course, by the time the exible walls Fitur-35h have reached the mid-positions shown, solenoids 54a and 55h will have become de-energized and pilot valves 69a and '10b will have been opened to primary pressure. The cycle will be completed when flexible walls 35a and 35h have reached the en-ds of their respective pressure and suction strokes shown in Fig. 6.

Figs. '7 to 16, inclusive, illustrate the preferred embodiment of the invention, which achieves a high degree of simplicity, compactness, eiciency of operation, and versatility. In brief, the casing sections of each pumping unit are in the form of at, comparatively thin, circular plates having very shallow working chambers and short-stroke flexible diaphragm-s. These plates, in the required number cooperative combinations, are adapted to be bound together in a compact in-line pump organization to afford the reduire-d number of piles for a particular volumetric output capacity which may be needed. To increase or decrease the capacity, al1 that is necessary is 'to add or subtract one or more diaphragm chambers. Furthermore, all units are identical in structure and thus interchangeable. A particil ular advantage of this interchangeability is the facility Vwith which casing sections and diaphragms of different composition may be exchanged to accommodate propellant-chemicals of diiierent corrosion characteristics.

As shown in Figs. 7 and 8, in particular, the completely assembled in-line organization of piles has the general form of a cylindrical casing i disposed with its axis horizontal on a flat supporting base 8l of suitable length and anchored to the latter in a manner which will be described presently.

Turning now to Figs. 10 and 11, it will be observed that the illustrative pump organization comprises two piles Iand thus may be termed appropriately a twin pile pump. The two piles are located on opposite sides of an anchor plate S2 which is suitably aflixed to base El' midway between its ends, and head plates 83' and B embrace the outer ends of said piles. As shown in Figs. "7 to 9, the assembled piles and plates 82;', 83 and 54 are clamped together in precise alignment and rigidity by tie bolts 85.

Each pile comprises two pump casing units (Figs. 10 and 1l) and each unit in turn is composed of mated casing sections 8% and 8l ,which are circular in general form and nearly identical in specific structure. One of the units is shown clearly in detail in Figs. 12 to 14. The left-hand casing section 85 (Figs. l2 and 13) has a comparatively shallow concavity formed in its inner (right) face to constitute the primary working chamber 88 of the unit. (Compare the axial depth of chamber 83 with that of the corresponding chambers represented in Figs. and 6 or even in Figs. 1 to 4.) Y The shallow secondary working chamber 89 formed in the inner (left) face of casing section 8"! differs from primary working chamber 88 principally in the provision of an annular depression Sii' of uniform depth which extends radially inward from the peripheral margin or said chamber approximately half-way to its central axis. Casing section E5 'is provided with an annular groove Si around the margin of primary working chamber 38. This groove 88 has a cylindrical peripheral wall 92 and preferably serrated side face S3. Casing section il has a narrow and deep cylindrical groove or out Se substantially flush with the outer wall of groove 9i of section 86.

Circular iiexible diaphragm 95 separates primary working chamber 88 from secondary working chamber 8S and has its marginal edge gripped between casing sections B6 and 81 when assembled. A serrated marginal bead 95 on diaphragm 35 is adapted to t snugly and securely in groove 9|.

Casing sections 36 and 31 are provided with central grilled ports 91 and 98, respectively, of large cross-sectional area. Casing section B5 also has a shallow annular cavity or depression 99 in its outer face surrounding port 91 in preferably eccentric relation thereto. Leading radially outward from the outermost part of cavity 39 is an outwardly enlarged groove Hill of semicircular cross-section which opens through the peripheral edge face of casing section 8S. Port sl, cavity SS and groove |00 are so constructed and arranged that they will register with these same indentations in the adjacent casing section 86 of the cooperative unit of a pile when assembled in the closely abutting relation shown in Figs. and 1l. In this assembled relation, cavities Sii- S9 and grooves Hill-IUD of both abutting casing sections 86-86 unite t0 form Gil.-

12 cular radial conducting passages mi for primary fluid.

Each casing section Bl' has a shallow, eccentric cavity m2 in its outer face surrounding port 98. From the outermost part of cavity iii?, a radial, outwardly enlarged groove 33 of semi-circular cross-section leads to and opens into an axial passage l' located near the periphery of said casing section 81. Actually, cavity te and groove i953 of casing section are identical inform with cavity i532 and groove it of casing section 81, but, in the assembled relation of both casing units of a pile (Figs. l0 and 11) they are disposed so that grooves l et and lift extend in diametrically opposite directions from the pile axis. Casing section 8% also is provided further with an axial passage i515 near its outer peripheral edge which is adapted to register with passage |534 of casing section 8'! when said sections are assembledv A short radial groove its or semi-circular crosssection leads outward from the outer end portion oi passage ili through the peripheral edge face of casing section 85. In the asseinded relation of both casing units of a pile, the grooves Emi-MS of the abutting sections of said casing units combine to form a circular passage lill.

It having been found in practice that the most suitable hydraulic pump for use as prime-mover (not shown) in the primary circulation system was incapable of pulling more than from one to three pounds of vacuum (13H-lll? PA.) the pressure differential between the primary side of a pump diphragm during a suction stroke and the pressure in the tank or origin (atmospheric pressure) is only about one to three pounds.

Therefore, in order to compensate for low suction pressure and to insure a quick, nonllagging suction stroke of each diaphragm, I have added suction-stroke bias to each diaphragm by applying thereto spring means which shown in detail in Figs. 12 to l5, inclusive. .A practical embodiment of the biasing means just mentioned is the generally annular spring i228 which includes a circumferential base ring it adapted to have its opposite side edge portions nt in grooves 9i and 9s of casing sections se and si' when assembled to form a casing unit. A web i lil, which lies in Ia plane prependicular to the casing axisy projects inward from base ring i533 and is adapted to be disposed on the secondary working chamber side of diaphragm Q5. Web lii is provided with substantially radial fingers ill projecting inward therefrom. 1n order to increase the ilexibility of fingers i i i, they are provided with longitudinal slots H2 which open into holes H3 located in web l l c close to base ring its. Considerable space between ngers is required in order to prevent overlapping of the :lingers and-danger of pinching the diaphragm While passing dead center.

Biasing spring 08 is shown in its normal preformed relaxed condition in solid lines in Fig. 13 and in broken lines in Fig. 12, wherein its fingers conform in arcuate shape to the concave wall of primary working chamber 83. In Fig. 14 and in full lines in Fig. l2, fingers iii of spring 193 appear in the sprung, fully tensioned position into which they will have been forced by diaphragm 95 at the end of a pressure stroke. In this tensioned condition, fingers Ill will be sheltered in an out-of-the-way position in depression to permit closing contact between diaphragm and the concave wall of secondary Working chamber 89.

In addition to the primarily intended biasing of diaphragm 95, spring |98 serves other useful purposes. It tends to preserve thev smooth shape of diaphragm 95 and prevent` excessive deformation such as would be likely to result eventually in creasing and rupture; and it absorbs and conducts heat from the diaphragm to the peripheral portions oi the casing for external radiation.

Referring again to Figs. and 11, it will be observed that the adjacent faces of anchorplate 82" and of head plates 83 and 84 cooperate with cavities |62 and grooves |83 of casing sections 8l to wall them in completely and thereby provide radial uid passages ||4.

The primary and secondary control valves H5 and |15 for the twin pile preferably are located in horizontal parallelism on opposite sides of the cylindrical casing 89'. Primary valve I5 includes a tubular casing closely abutting the peripheral edges of the respective sections of all casing units. Valve casing may be supported by plates 82-83-84 in any manner which may be expedient. A single elongated valve plunger HB is mounted to reciprocate in the interior chamber I|9 of valve casing I|'| from one extreme dwell position to the other. Suitable detent means is provided to secure valve plunger H8 yieldably in either dwell position until overcome by the operating force which shifts said valve plunger in its normal operation. Ports l2! and |22 are provided in valve casing for registration with the respective passages HB1-Hi! of the lefthand and righthand piles which make up the twin organization. Primary suction and pressure ports |23 and |24 are provided in valve casing adjacent to each of passages lili-IBI for connection to the respective suction and pressure lines 48 and 49 of the primary circulation system. Valve plunger II8 has appropriately spaced annular peripheral grooves or channels |25 and |26 which, in the right-hand dwell position of said plunger (Fig. 10), are adapted to span and thereby interconneet ports |2i49 and ports |22-48, respectively, and, in the opposite leithand dwell position (Fig. il) to span and interconnect ports |2|-48 and ports I22-49, respectively.

Valve plunger I i8 is aiiixed to the cores of solenoids |21 and |28. When energized, solenoid i2? is adapted to move valve plunger H3 to the left, and solenoid |28 is adapted to move said plunger in the opposite direction.

Control Valve IIB also includes a tubular casing |29, in the chamber |30 of which elongated valve plunger |3I is mounted tok reciprocate between extreme dwell positions. Suitable detent means |32 also is provided to secure valve plunger yieldably in either dwell position. Ports |33 and |34 in casing |29 are positioned to communicate with passages IIN- |91 of the respective lefthand and righthand piles of the composite twin. Primary delivery and intake ports |35 and |36 are provided in valve casing |29 adjacent to each of the ports Mil-|31 for connection, respectively, with secondary delivery line D and intake line I. Valve plunger ISI is provided at appropriate intervals with peripheral annular grooves or channels |37 and |38 which, in the lefthand dwell position (Fig. l0) are adapted to span and thereby interconnect ports ISE-|33 and ports IBS-|34, respectively, and, in the opposite righthand dwell position (Fig. 1l), to span and interconnect ports |36-| 33 and ports ISS-434, respectively.

Valve plunger |3| is affixed to the cores of 14 solenoids 39' and |40'. When. energized, solenoid |33 is adapted to move, valve plunger 9| to. the right and solenoid |40' is adapted to shift said plunger in the opposite direction.

A micro-switch |4| is mounted on head plate S3 and has a pushbutton |4l projecting normally into. secondary working chamber 89 of the adjacent pump pile when said switch is open for actuating contact by the adjacent diaphragm 95 atA they completion of its pressure stroke. Microswitch |4|= is connected electrically with solenoids |21 and i453 in such a manner that closing of the switch will energize both of said solenoids and thereby cause primary and secondary valve piungers I|B and l! to be shifted synchronously in opposite directions into their respective lefthand and right-hand dwell positions.

A micro-switch |42 is mounted on the opposite head plate 84 and has a pushbutton |42 projecting normally into secondary working chamber 85 ofthe adjacent pump pile when said switch is open for actuating contact by the adjacent diaphragm at the completion oi its pressure stroke. Micro-switch |42 is connected electrically with solenoids |28 and |39 in such a manner that closing of the switch will energize both of said solenoids and thereby cause primary and secondary valve plungers I I8 and I3! to be shift'- ed synchronously in opposite directions into their respective righthand and lefthand dwell positions.

The operation of the twin pile should be under'- stood readily upon further reference to the two operating cycles represented in Figs. l0Y and 11. 10 shows the diaphragme and interlocked control valve settings at the end of a cycle in which the two cooperative diaphragme of the leitnand pile have just completed their joint pressure stroke, in which they moved apart from each other, and the two cooperative diaphragms of the righthand pile have just completed their joint suction stroke, in which they closed toward each other. Valve plungers |58 and i3d are shown during the instant when micro-switch vlei is closing the circuits of solenoids I2l' and Ends and the latter are on the point of shifting said valve plungers in opposite directions to the new dwell positions represented in Fig. 1l.

When the shift occurs, control valve I|5 will connectV primary working chambers 8d- 88 of the lefthand pile with primary suction line 43 through the medium of port |23, plunger channel |25, passage IDI, and both ports .9T-91. Simultaneously, control valve ||5 will connect primary working chambers 88-88 of the righthand pile with primary pressure line 49 through the medium of port |24, plunger channel |28, passage IBI, and both ports ill- 91. Application of suction and pressure in this manner will cause the cooperative diaphragms of the lefthand pile to fclose toward each other into the positions shown in Fig. l1, whereas the diaphragms of the righthand pile will move apart into the positions shown. During this motivating action by primary fluid, secondary fluid will be moved in the direction of the arrows in Fig. 1l, i. e. secondary fluid will be drawn from secondary intake line I in the direction of the arrows through port |36, valve channel |31, port |33, passages ll-lM--i I4, and both ports SBS-11 into secondary working chambers 89-39 of the lefthand pile. At the same time, previously captivated secondary uid will be pressurized and then expelled in pressurized condition from secondary working chambers 89-89 i of the righthand pile in the direction of the arrows through ports SB-Sii passages IIA-|05- l, ports i315, valve channel E38, and port 135 into secondary delivery line D.

At the end of the second cycle represented in Fig. 1l, the pushbutton m2 of micro-switch M2 has been pushed inward by the adjacent diaphragm 95 and solenoids |28 and |39 are going into action to reverse the interlocked control valves H5 and Ht and thereby start the diaphragms of the lrespective piles through the cycle represented as just ending in Fig. 1i). During this two-stroke cycle, the primary and secondary iluids moved in the direction of the arrows.

It should now be understood that in the twin pile illustrated in Figs. and 11, the cooperative pairs of diaphragme of both piles pulsate in a bellows-like action alternately toward and away from each other. The stroke is very short, but maximum volumetric output capacity is realized for the small size and weight of the pump as a whole. Due to this characteristic, the multiple pile organization renders the pump well suited for installation in the cramped interior of rockets and other aerial projectiles and aircraft for use lin delivering propellants from Acontained tanks to burners or other delivery points either preceding night or during night under radio control, as well as for external use with ground equipment. A still further use for which the multiple pile pump is well suited is for pressurizing of fuels in the servicing of large military name throwers.

In Figs. 17 to 19, inclusive, there are shown in three successive operational stages the flexible wall units alone of a modied double-unit pump, wherein the ilexible walls are elastic as well as exible and are intended to function through alternate distention and contraction.

Referring nrst to Fig. 17, the double-unit pump comprises lefthand unit A and righthand unit B, which retain their relative positions in Figs. 18 and 19. Both units are identical in construction when in the condition represented in unit A (Fig. 17) in which the flexible Wall member is contracted. The respective casings I 43a and Mtb are open-ended cylinders having reduced externally screw-threaded necks UMa-Mtb and Esta-iddo at their lower and upper ends, respectively, for engagement with clamping rings ifstia-ittb and llila-ilb which secure said casing necks Mila-Mtb and Idea-|4519, respectively, tc the externally flanged necks i/lla and with of two-way primary ports Hita and iii-9b and to similar necks lta and i501) of secondary ports ldlc and Iib of the respective primary and secondary control valve casings (not shown). At the lower base ends of casings Hita and ib, the externally anged base ends of tubular collapse-preventing forms 52a and Mib are clamped between the eX- ternally anged ends of port necks la and liib and the lower edges of casing necks Mila and lliib, respectively. These collapse-preventing forms l'a and 5211 project into casings Hita and with and extend throughout almost the entire length of the interior of said casings. Forms 552e and i525 have numerous fluidpenetrable periorations iia and i532) from their bases to their upper ends, which latter are provided with smoothly convex caps I-Slia and |551) having central perforations la and i551) therein. Enclosing collapse-preventing forms l52a and i521) are flexible wall members la and i561), respectively, which are thimble-shaped in form and, in their normal relaxed condition, closely fit the respective collapse-preventing forms in the manner shown in the lefthand unit A (Fig. 17), wherein the closed upper end of ilexible wall member ita is seated on -cap ilc of form l52a. The open base ends or flexible wall members Iiia and Eiib are tightly gripped between the downwardly ilared outer surfaces of the base portions or collapse-preventing forms 52@ :and i521), respectively, and the internal surfaces of the casing necks liia and Mtb, which are correspondingly outwardly dared. To make the connection of the base portions of flexible wall members Etta and I-S'b with casing necks laila and Edil) even more secure, the former are downwardly thickened and externally serrated for interlocking engagement with correspondingly serrated inner surfaces of the latter.

An important structural feature of iiexible wall members Etta and itb is the fact that they are made of elastic material, such as rubber or a rubber substitute. Moreover, the closed upper ends of said exible members are axially thickened to prevent deformation in action and their side walls are gradually tapered in radial thickness downwardly from the thickened upper ends thereof to the base portions. The tapered thickr ness of the side walls of each flexible wall member serves to propagate distention progressively upward from the base during a. pressure stroke and, conversely, to propagate contraction downward toward the base during a suction stroke, as will be explained more fully hereinafter.

Flexible wall members i 5ta and itb are nuisiinpervious and sealed so tightly at their bases in the manner already described that they effectively divide the respective casings 143e and Ifitb into radially inner and outer primary and Working chambers laila- 557e and i 5tai 58h. "Obviously, when ilexible wall member ita of lefthand unit A is in its fully contracted condition as shown in Fig. 17, primary working chamber 557e is restricted to the interior chamber of collapse-preventing form ic, whereas in the righthand unit B, in which ilexible wall member E56?) is fully distended, pri mary working chamber i571) will occupy practically the interior space of casing Mtb while secondary working chamber i582) will have been reduced to zero capacity.

At the upper ends of casings idea and iib, micro-switches 55511 and lib are located for use in connection with the control valve operating circuits (not shown) and have their respective pushbuttons IEM and Sb projecting into the respective secondary working chambers i 53a and |581) for triggering contact by the upper ends of exible wall members Etta and H5573. n order to insure positive and instantaneous switch actuation, the upper ends of ilegible wall members Lita and lett are provided with metallic rings embedded in their outer surfaces for direct, hard pushbutton contact.

Operation of the double-unit pumps ilexible wall members will be understood upon reference to Figs. 17, 18 and 19 in that consecutive order. Fig. 17 represents the operational stage at the instant a pressure stroke is commencing casing M3U. and a suction stroke is commencing in casing I 319. In Fig. 18, partial progress in these simultaneous pressure and suction strokes is rep resented. In the lefthand casing Mita, pressure in primary chamber lla is distending nexible wall member |5611. Because the upper portionsv of the side walls of said member |5611 are thicker than the lower portions and because the increase in thickness is graduated, the lower portions will become distended rst since they oiTer the least resistance to radial pressure. Consequently, the complete distention of iexible wall member |5611 is propagated steadily upward without any ineiiicient, fatigue-producing irregularities in exible wall action. The same thing occurs in reverse order in the opposite suction stroke represented in the righthand casing |4311. In this case, the thicker upper side wall portions of ilexible wall member |5621 have a stronger contractional tendency than the thinner lower side wall portions, so the contraction is propagated downward in regular progression. Fig. 19 represents completion of the pressure and suction strokes of iiexible wall members |5511 and |5611 in the respective casings |43@ and |4311, and, shows the microswitch |5611 in the act of being triggered for control valve reversal.

Figs. 20 to 24, inclusive, illustrate a modiiied form of the type of pump disclosed in Figs. 17 to 19. In this instance, the complete pump is shown. rEhe casings |6|a and I6|b differ from casings M311 and |431) of the other embodiment principally in the relative dispositions of the secondary ports and the micro-switches and in the form of flexible wall members |6261 and |6211. The upper ends of casings lla and |6|b are closed to form rounded domes |6311, and |6319 and render the casings generally bottle-shaped, and the secondary ports are located substantially midway between the ends of the casings. In this embodiment of the invention, there are two secondary ports for each casing, i. e. casing |6|1z and casing |6111 have secondary intake ports lfsa and |6411, respectively, connected with secondary intake lines I-I, and secondary delivery ports |6511 and |651) connected with secondary delivery lines D-D. Because of this arrangement with no intervening control valves, the respective secondary intake and delivery line connections must have suitable check valves (not shown) to prevent retrograde flow therein.

A single double-acting control valve |66 is provided in the base |61 on which casings |'6|11 and I6|b are mounted in upright coextensive positions. This control valve has a horizontally elongated valve chamber |68 underlying both casings 16| and |6|b and provided with two-way ports |6611 and |691) communicating with the lower ends of the respective collapse-preventing forms |1011 and |101). Primary pressure and suction ports |1| and |12 are provided respectively below and above the mid-portion of valve chamber |68 for connection with the respective primary pressure and suction lines |13 and |14. Primary pressure port I1| is branched to communicate with valve chamber |68 through two longitudinally spaced mouths. Similarly, suction port |12 is branched to communicate with valve chamber |68 through longitudinally spaced mouths in vertical registration with the mouths of port |1|.

A valve plunger |15 is mounted to slide back and forth longitudinally in valve chamber |68 between the two terminal dwell positions shown in Figs. and 21, respectively. A spring-pressed dwell-latch |16, such as that shown in Figs. 20 and 21 in reduced size and on a large scale in Fig. 24, is provided in control valve |66 to secure valve plunger |15 yieldingly in either dwell position. The bottom face of valve |15 is of such construction and longitudinal extent that it will cover one Vmouth of pressure port |1| and open the other mouth thereof to the interior of valve chamber |68 in one dwell position of said plunger and will reverse the connection of port mouths and valve chamber in the opposite dwell position. The upper face of valve plunger |15 has longitudinally spaced channels |11|11 which are so positioned that, in the dwell position wherein pressure port |1I is in communication with port |6911 of casing |6|a (Fig 20), suction port 12 will be in communication with port |6911 of casing |6119, and, in the opposite dwell position, wherein pressure port |1| is connected with port |6511 of casing |621) (Fig. 21), suction port |12 will be in communication with port [69a of casing |6|11.

The cores of solenods |18 and |19 are aliixed to opposite ends of Valve plunger |15 and are so wound and arranged in electric circuits (not shown) controlled by micro-switches and |8I that shifting of said valve plunger back and forth in synchronization with completion of each pressure stroke by flexible wall members |6211 and |3219, respectively, is effected.

It will be observed that both micro-switches are located substantially at the same level as secondary ports ttm-[64b and |6511-l65b. At this level, the pushbuttons |80 and |8| of microswitches |36 and |8I, respectively, project into the secondary chambers of casings |6|a and |6|b form Contact with the midportions of flexible wall members |6261 and |6219, respectively, upon completion of their pressure strokes. In this instance, iiexible wall members |6261 and |6211 both have their side walls centrally thickened and tapered in thickness toward the upper and lower ends thereof. Due to this wall structure, pressure of primary iuid during a pressure stroke will be exerted through the interior of collapsepreventing form |1511 or |1012, as the case may be, against both thin end portions of the side walls oi the iiexible member concerned in the beginning to commence distention in these regions. Thereafter, the distention will be propagated axially inward toward the thickened medial portion. Reverse propagation of contraction progresses endwaro. from the center in a suction stroke.

The operation of this modied form of doubleunit pump will now be described. Fig. 20 represents the operational stage wherein lefthand unit A is approaching the end of a pressure stroke and righthand unit B is at the end of a suction stroke. A moment later, when the pressure stroke has been completed, the thickened midportion of flexible wall member |6211 will have contacted pushbutton |86' and thereby closed micro-switch |653. When this occurs, control valve |66 will be shifted to the dwell position represented in Fig. 2l to reverse the strokes in the manner shown.

Fig. 25 illustrates a quadruple-unit pump and has been introduced to demonstrate the compact construction which may be achieved when doubling the capacity of the type of pump disclosed in Figs. 20 to 24. Only the general organization of casings of the two double-unit pumps which have been combined is shown. In this embodiment, it is as if a second double-unit pump of that kind were moved into position directly alongside (beneath in Fig. 25) the pump disclosed in Fig. 22. Casings |8211 and |8213 in Fig. 25 correspond to casings |6|11 and |6|b in Fig. 22. To these casings |8211 and |8211 have been added the casings |8311 and |8321 of the sec- 19 ond pump.' The principal departure lies in the rearrangement of the secondary lines and their connection with the various secondary chambers of the quadruple-unit pump. For example, secondary intake lines I--I independently communicate with the secondary chambers of casingsY iSEa and 82?? on one side of the pump and with the secondary chambers of casings w3c and |8317 on the opposite side, as shown. One Y-shaped delivery line manifold D is connected with the vsecondary chambers of casings l82a and 183e and a second Y-shaped delivery line manifold D is connected with the secondary chambers of casings i821) and l3b at the opposite end of the pump. The manner in which this modified pump operates should be obvious withoutV further illustration or description.

lt will be understood that it is intended to cover all changes and modifications of the examples of the invention herein chosen for the purpose of illustration which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described the invention, I claim:

1. A high pressure pump of the iiexible wall type for operative connection to the pressure and suction lines of a power-giving primary circulation system and to the intake and delivery lines of a secondary conduction system for the fiuid to be pumped, said pump comprising: a combined pump casing and valve chamber structure which is closed to the atmosphere; a flexible wall member dividing the pump casing into non-communicating primary and secondary working charnbers; said structure having a primary valve chamber closely adjoining the primary working chamber and connected therewith by a two-way port and also having a secondary valve chamber closely adjoining the secondary working chamber and connected therewith by a two-way port; said structure being further provided with primary pressure and suction ports for the primary valve chamber and with secondary delivery and intake ports for the secondary valve chamber; primary valve means in the primary valve chamber to connect the corresponding two-way port alternately with the primary pressure and suction ports; secondary valve means in the secondary valve chamber to connect the corresponding two- Vway port alternately with the secondary delivery and intake ports; positively acting means for interlocking operation of the primary and secondary valve means in a manner whereby opening of the primary working chamber to the primary pressure port and synchronous opening of the secondary working chamber to the secondary delivery port is eiected alternately with opening of the primary working chamber to the primary ondary working chamber to the secondary intake port; and means for intermittently triggering the Y valve operating means to cause'sequential suction and pressure strokes of the exible wall member.

2. A high pressure pump as dened in claim 1, wherein the triggering means for the valve operating means is actuated by the stroking movement of the flexible wall means.

3. A high pressure pump as deiined in claim 1, wherein the triggering means for the valve operatingV means is actuated by completion of each stroke ofthe flexible wallV member.

4. A high pressure pump as deiined in claim 1, which includes means for biasing the exible wall member for acceleratedmovement in its suc- ;ion strokes. Y Y l Y 5( 'A high pressure pump as defined in claim l,`

which includes spring means for biasing the flexible wall member for accelerated movement in its suction strokes,

5. A high pressure pump as defined in claim l, which includes spring means for biasing the flexible wall member for accelerated movement in its suction strokes, said spring biasing means being in the form of a iiat spring member disposed on the secondary working chamber side of the flexible wall member and being anchored rigidly in the pump casing structure and bearing atly against said flexible wall member, said spring member being in its minimum tension condition when it and the flexible wall member are located at the end of the suction stroke,

7. A high pressure pump as defined in claim l, wherein the flexible wall member is in the form of a circular diaphragm, and wherein spring means is included for biasing said flexible wall member for accelerated movement in its suction strokes, said spring biasing means being in the form of a at annular spring member disposed on the secondary working chamber side of the flexible wall member and having a base portion anchored rigidly in the pump casing structure and inwardly projecting radial fingers bearing flatly against said flexible wall member, said spring member being in its minimum tension condition when it and the Llexible wall member are located at the end of the suction stroke.

8. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 1, wherein the pump casing is elongated and cylindrical in cross-section and wherein the flexible wall member is thimble-shaped and disposed coaxially within the casing with its open end sealed to one end or the casing in registration with the two-way port thereof to divide the same respectively into radially inner and outer primary and secondary working chambers, said flexible wall member being composed of elastic material and being adapted to distend during each pressure stroke and to contract during each suction stroke.

9. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 1, wherein the pump casing is elongated and cylindrical in cross-section and wherein the iiexible wail member is thimble-shaped and disposed coaxially within the casing with its open end sealed to one end of the casing in registration with the two-way port thereof to divide the same respectively into radially inner and outer primary and secondary working chambers, said flexible wall member being composed of elastic material and being adapted to distend during each pressure stroke and to contract during each suction stroke,

' said flexible wall member also being constructed so that its side wall is tapered longitudinally in thickness toward its open end, whereby distention during each pressure stroke is propagated outward from the two-way port which is connected with the primary pressure port and whereby contraction during each Vsuction stroke is propagated inward toward said two-way port.

' 10. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 1, wherein the pump casing is elongated and cylindrical in cross-section and wherein the ilexible wall member isthimble-shaped and disposedcoaxially within the casing with its open end sealed to one endof the casing in registration with the two-way port thereof to divide the same respectively into radially inner and outer primary accepta 2l stroke, and wherein a perforate tubular collapsepreventing form is mounted inside the flexible wall member in communication with the twoway port and is adapted to fit the interior of the said flexible member when in contracted condition.

11. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 1, wherein the pump casing is elongated and cylindrical in cross-section and wherein the flexible wall member is thimble-shaped and disposed coaxially within the casing with its open end sealed to one end of the casing in registration with the two-way port thereof to divide the same respectively lnto radially inner and outer primary and secondary working chambers, said flexible wall member being composed of elastic material and being adapted to distend during each pressure stroke and to contract during each suction stroke, said flexible wall member being constructed so that its side wall is tapered endward from the medial portion thereof, whereby distention during each pressure stroke is propagated progressively inward from the ends of said flexible wall member toward the center thereof and contraction during each suction stroke is propagated endward from said center, and wherein the secondary delivery and intake ports are disposed opposite to the medial portion of the flexible wall member.

12. A high pressure pump of the flexible wall type for operative connection to the pressure and suction lines of a power-giving primary circulation system and to the intake and delivery lines of a secondary conduction system for the fluid to be pumped, said pump comprising: at least one pair of individual pumping units, each of which units includes a combined pump casing and valve chamber structure which is closed to the atmosphere; flexible wall members dividing the respective pump casings into non-communicating primary and secondary working chambers; said structure having a primary valve chamber closely adjoining the primary working chamber of each pumping unit and connected therewith by a two-way port, and having a secondary valve chamber closely adjoining the secondary working chamber of said unit and connected therewith by a two-way port; said structure being further provided with primary pressure and suction ports for the primary valve chamber of each pumping unit and with secondary delivery and intake ports for the secondary valve chamber of said unit; interconnected primary valve members movable in the primary valve chambers of all pumping units between spaced dwell positions and being adapted in one dwell position to connect the corresponding two-way port of one primary working chamber with the primary pressure port and the corresponding two-way port of the other primary working chamber with the primary suction port, and in the other dwell position to reverse the connections of the respective two-way ports with the primary pressure and suction ports; interconnected secondary valve members movable in the secondary valve chambers of all pumping units between spaced dwell positions and being adapted in one dwell position to connect the corresponding two-way port of one secondary working chamber with the secway port of the other secondary working chamber with the secondary intake port, and in the other dwell position to reverse the connections of the respective two-way ports with the secondary delivery and intake ports; positively acting means for interlocking operation of the primary and secondary valve members in a manner whereby opening of the primary working chamber of one pumping unit to the primary pressure port and synchronous opening of the secondary working chamber of the same unit to the secondary delivery port is effected alternately with opening of the primary working chamber of the other pumping unit to the primary suction port and synchronous opening of the secondary working chamber of the said other unit to the secondary intake port; and means for intermittently triggering the valve operating means to cause sequential pressure and suction strokes of the flexible wall members of all pumping units.

13. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 12, wherein the triggering means for the valve operating means is actuated by the stroking movement of the several flexible wall members.

14. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 12, wherein the triggering means for the valve operating means is actuated by completion of the pressure stroke of each flexible wall member.

15. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 12, wherein the pump casings of the respective pumping units are in the form of flat circular plates adapted to be arranged in axial alignment and close contiguity in a pile formation, said plates having opposed concavities in their adjacent faces to form the primary and secondary working chambers, the flexible wall member for each pair of plates being in the form of a circular diaphragm and having its marginal edge sealed between the marginal portions of said plates.

16. A high pressure pump as defined in claim 12, wherein each pumping unit is composed of' a pair of pump casings of circular form arranged in axial alignment and close contiguity in a pile formation, each pump casing being composed in turn of two circular flat plates having opposed concavities in their adjacent faces to form the primary and secondary working chambers, the flexible wall member for each pair of plates being in the form of a circular diaphragm and having its marginal edge sealed between the marginal portions of said plates, adjacent plates of both pairs which constitute a pile being provided with registering intercommunicating ports whereby the inwardly adjacent working chambers form cooperative primary working chambers and the outer working chambers form cooperative secondary working chambers, the respective casing plates being provided with passages leading from the primary working chambers to the corresponding two-way port which communicates with one of the primary valve chambers and with passages leading from the secondary working chambers to the corresponding two-way port which communicates with one of the secondary valve chambers.

LEON J. GEERAERT.

Name Date Perry Jan. 16, 1900 Number

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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/317, 92/92, 92/98.00R, 417/347, 200/83.00B, 92/104, 417/395, 417/345, 91/275, 92/48, 92/50, 92/98.00D, 92/94, 417/394
International ClassificationF02K9/00, F04B43/08, F02K9/46, F04B43/00, F04B43/073, F04B43/113, F01L25/06, F01L25/00, F04B43/06, F01L25/08
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/0054, F01L25/06, F04B43/08, F02K9/46, F04B43/073, F04B43/1136, F04B43/0736, F01L25/08
European ClassificationF04B43/073C, F02K9/46, F01L25/08, F04B43/00D8, F01L25/06, F04B43/08, F04B43/113C, F04B43/073