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Publication numberUS2655663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1953
Filing dateSep 29, 1950
Priority dateSep 29, 1950
Publication numberUS 2655663 A, US 2655663A, US-A-2655663, US2655663 A, US2655663A
InventorsHoagland Earl J
Original AssigneeStandard Safety Equipment Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Detachable hermetic sealing joint for garments
US 2655663 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1953 E. J. HOAGLAND DETACHABLE HERMETIC SEALING JOINT FOR GARMENTS Filid Sept. 29, 1950 W, 2* ATTORNEYS:

Patented Oct. 20, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICEK- I ,DETACHABLE HERMETIC SEALING JOINT FOR GARMENTS Earl J. Hoagland, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Standand Safety Equipment 00., a corporation of I 7 Illinois Application September 29, 1950, Serial No. 187,474

3 Claims.

rubber glove was closed by a drawstring or an hermetically sealed connection with the gauntlet.

elastic band, with the glove gauntlet inside the sleeve. This arrangement pulls the sleeve tight, but produces folds of material which are not liquid-tight and sometimes uncomfortably squeeze the wrist of the wearer. In using a gauntlet type glove, if the gauntlet is placed within the sleeve it is only effective when the hand is held downwardly, and if the sleeve is placed within the gauntlet it may catch splashed material when the hand is held downwardly.

The present invention provides a joint between a gloove and sleeve which is liquid-tight and hermetically sealed regardless of the position of the arm and hand. The joint permits the glove to be removed and replaced, but the glove is put on before the sleeve is pulled into position and can' The invention is illustrated in a preferred em,

bodiment in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a longitudinal view, showing the joint made with the gauntlet of a rubber glove; Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view, taken as indicated at line 2-2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3, a perspective view of the stiffening insert which may be inserted in the gauntlet portion of the glove to prevent its collapse when compressed by the elastic sleeve.

In the embodiment illustrated, a conventional rubber glove 4 is provided with an outwardly flared gauntlet portion 5 into which a stiffening insert 6 may be inserted. Preferably the insert is tapered like the gauntlet portion of the glove, and may be made of cardboard, cellulose acetate, or even light metal. It may be made of a flat strip of material with its ends stapled together, as indicated at 1. The insert may be cemented to the gauntlet, stapled to it, or fastened in any desired manner, such as by a snap-fastener 8 engaging a socket member 9 of the insert.

A garment sleeve III is preferably made of a flexible fabric having a chemically-resistant coating. To the lower portion of the garment sleeve I0 is stitched an elastic sleeve member II, as indicated at I 2. Preferably, this member is of a rubber-like material, and has a shape similar to the gauntlet portion of the glove. This may be turned inside out durin the stitching operation and then turned back, as shown in Fig. 2, so that it may be pulled around the gauntlet of a glove in telescoping relation, so as to make a If desired, it may also be held against longitudinal displacement by a snap fastener 13 engaging a socket member Hi. The stitching I2 and the socket member I4 are preferably given a chemically-resistant coating, such as rubber cement or a compounded neoprene latex.

As shown in Fig. 2, it is preferred to have a short length of sleeve allowed to extend beyond the seam of the gauntlet, to provide a gripping area for adjusting the sleeve. Preferably the stiffening liner 6 is about three inches in length, so that when the joint is made there is an area of approximately thirty-six square inches of rubber-to-rubber contact under tension. This has been found suflicient to insure complete protection against liquid and gas seepage.

In using the device, the gloves are put on first. Then, the gloved hands are thrust through the sleeves and the sleeves are pulled up over the.

gauntlets until the tapered collar stitched to the sleeve fits snugly around the gauntlet portion of the glove which is reinforced with the liner. If a snap-fastener is used, it may then be engaged and the parts adjusted into a smooth tensioned telescopin relationship. To remove the garment, the fastener is unsnapped and the garment pulled off over the glove.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In combination: a glove having a smoothly rounded, tapered gauntlet stiffened against circumferential collapse; and a garment sleeve provided at its lower end with an elastic sleeve portion having an opening of smaller diameter than the gauntlet of said glove whereby said sleeve member may be tensioned smoothly about said gauntlet in continuous face-to-face telescoping 3 an outwardly tapered gauntlet; a removable annular stiffening insert within said gauntlet; and a flexible sleeve of rubber-like material adapted to be drawn over and tensioned smoothly around said gauntlet in telescoping relation so as to make a detachable yielding hermetically sealed connection with the gauntlet.

3. In combination: a smoothly rounded tapered fabric member stiffened against circumferential collapse; and a garment sleeve provided at its lower end with an elastic sleeve portion having an opening of smaller diameter than said tapered member whereby said sleeve may be tensioned smoothly about the tapered member in continuous face-to-face telescoping relation so' 15 as to make a detachable hermetically sealed connection therewith.

EARL J. HOAGLAND.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,061,686 Nichols May 13, 1913 1,642,670 Davis et al Sept. 20, 1927 1,748,833 Dunne Feb. 25, 1930 1,784,285 Heaton Dec. 9, 1930 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 2,466 Great Britain May 13, 1913

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1061686 *Oct 3, 1911May 13, 1913Perry John NicholsWrist and sleeve protector.
US1642670 *Jul 19, 1924Sep 20, 1927Davis Charles HProtective garment
US1748833 *Mar 19, 1928Feb 25, 1930Woods Mfg Company LtdAviator's gauntlet
US1784285 *Oct 26, 1926Dec 9, 1930Tufoak Products CoMethod and means for making garments
GB191302466A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2779331 *Sep 12, 1952Jan 29, 1957Trexler Philip CProtective garment
US2813272 *Apr 20, 1955Nov 19, 1957Hagan Eugene TDetachable fluid-tight joint for protective clothing
US2842773 *Dec 23, 1955Jul 15, 1958Reyniers & SonJoint for connecting flexible tubular members
US3045815 *Aug 24, 1959Jul 24, 1962Plastomeric Products CorpSurgeon's gown and glove assembly and method of sterilizing same
US3099015 *Jun 14, 1960Jul 30, 1963Renehan William JJoint for interconnecting tubular members
US3103016 *Mar 24, 1960Sep 10, 1963Temperature Engineering CorpGlove assembly for controlled atmosphere enclosure
US3128476 *Jul 24, 1961Apr 14, 1964Lash SeymourFluid-impermeable closure
US3140495 *Sep 9, 1960Jul 14, 1964Wilson Rubber CompanyGlove assembly
US3504984 *Mar 13, 1967Apr 7, 1970Stanley WorksGarment
US3747126 *Aug 31, 1971Jul 24, 1973Standard Safety Equipment CoCollapsible hermetic sealing joint for garments
US4023223 *Mar 29, 1976May 17, 1977Cosalt LimitedProtective clothing
US4099270 *Feb 16, 1977Jul 11, 1978Jabour Richard JSlip-on rubber gloves
US4479268 *May 24, 1982Oct 30, 1984Tillbrook Anthony A CSportman's waterproof suit
US5208919 *Feb 10, 1992May 11, 1993Lion Apparel, Inc.Firefighter coat with reservoir cuff
US5572743 *Jun 7, 1994Nov 12, 1996Yavitz; Edward Q.Surgical gown
US5628067 *Jul 3, 1995May 13, 1997Donald Guthrie Foundation For Education And ResearchLiquid impervious sleeve-glove interface for protective garments and method of producing same
US6122772 *Oct 20, 1998Sep 26, 2000Micronova Manufacturing, Inc.Sleeve, gown assembly and gown cuff assembly
US6523181Jun 1, 2001Feb 25, 2003Standard Safety Equipment CompanyProtective gauntlet and garment
US6715159Jun 5, 2002Apr 6, 2004Her Majesty The Queen In Right Of Canada As Represented By The Minister Of Natural ResourcesAngularly disengageable glove-to-cuff connection apparatus
US7480945Sep 22, 2005Jan 27, 2009Playtex Products, Inc.Glove having a cuffed portion
US7814572 *Dec 1, 2008Oct 19, 2010Paadz Products, Inc.Reusable cuff barrier
US8146174Dec 15, 2008Apr 3, 2012Playtex Products, Inc.Glove having a cuffed portion
US8726415 *Nov 30, 2004May 20, 2014Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garments having elastomeric gaskets along margins to inhibit ingress of potentially harmful materials
US20110239349 *Jun 15, 2011Oct 6, 2011Thompson W FrederickMedical gown with a secondary sleeve for extending over a surgical glove
US20120066810 *Dec 23, 2010Mar 22, 2012Cynthia MarcusHand and forearm protection apparel
US20130239307 *Aug 26, 2010Sep 19, 2013Shigematsu Works Co., Ltd.Chemical protective suit
US20150082511 *Sep 23, 2013Mar 26, 2015Ralph BryantGrip enhancing hand and wrist covering
USRE35682 *May 11, 1995Dec 9, 1997Lion Apparel, Inc.Firefighter coat with reservoir cuff
EP0067530A1 *May 14, 1982Dec 22, 1982Anthony Arthur Charles TillbrookSportsman's waterproof suit
EP0784941A2 *Jan 15, 1997Jul 23, 1997W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATESWaterproof glove
WO1998025486A2 *Nov 26, 1997Jun 18, 1998De Guzman Joselito SSleeve, gown assembly, gown cuff assembly, and gown and air shower assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/270, D02/621, 2/82, 2/170, 312/1
International ClassificationA41D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/0089
European ClassificationA41D19/00P10C