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Publication numberUS2656045 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1953
Filing dateJul 10, 1951
Priority dateJul 10, 1951
Publication numberUS 2656045 A, US 2656045A, US-A-2656045, US2656045 A, US2656045A
InventorsCurtis Philip C
Original AssigneeCurtis Philip C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knockdown shelving
US 2656045 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1953 P. c. CURTIS KNOCKDOWN SHELVING Filed July 10, 1951 Patented Oct. 20, 1953 UNITED STATES RATENT OFFICE 2 Claims.

This invention relates to the construction of household furniture and the like. More particularly it is concerned with providing a novel knockdown table having one or more shelves, and a unique table top, wherein the several component parts of the table can be easily and cheaply manufactured and which are so fabricated that they can be easily and quickly assembled together without the use of external fastening elements such as nails, screws, glue, bolts, or the like.

In the past the several efforts that have been made to produce inexpensive, simply constructed knockdown, shelved tables wherein the use of external fastening elements such as nails, bolts, screws, etc. is eliminated, have not met with success for one or more reasons.

For example, certain of the tables that were developed, were not of sufficient rigidity or strength to withstand normal abuse and wear and conse quently were impractical.

Other tables had sections which were of such an intricate and complex design, that they did not quickly lend themselves to easy and cheap methods of fabrication. The design of these sections also required special tools to assemble the parts together, or special skill on the part of those charged with arranging the several elements together to make the finished product.

The parts of such tables were also ordinarily made of metal, since other materials such as wood and particularly plywood were not considered to have the inherent strength and rigidity to supply satisfactory and strong interlocking parts, thereby obviating the necessity of using external fastening elements.

These are but a few of the factors which previously have made extensive manufacture and sale of tables put together without the use of nails, bolts, screws, glue or the like impractical.

It has been found, however, that by uniquely designing the several parts of the table so that each part will suitably interfit with an adjacent part or element while simultaneously providing a strong and rigid joint therebetween, that a rigid and exceptionally strong shelved table may be provided, and one which can be quickly and conveniently manufactured and cheaply sold.

In addition, the shelved table of the instant invention is made up of sections which are so easy to assemble that even a child is capable of arranging them together in their proper relationship. The table is also made from a minimum amount of parts.

The overall table design of the instant invention also possesses such inherent strength and rigidity that the several parts thereof can all be made of wood, and particularly thin plywood, without any sacrifice in structural strength.

The simplicity in design of each component part or section of the table is unique and provides for easy and quick assembly. These parts before assembly and after dismantlement can be easily stored in a minimum amount of space, and never at any time need one be concerned about the use of nails, bolts, screws or the like, nor is one required to have special tools during assembly or dismantlement of the sections.

The table is also provided with a novel table top having apertures therein especially designed to hold articles such as vases firmly anchored to the table whereby when the table is accidentally jarred or bumped an article like a vase will not be upset.

It is a primary object of thi invention, therefore, to provide a novel knockdown shelved table having interlocking parts, which supply their own fastening elements in and of themselves.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel knockdown shelved table of exceptional strength and rigidity while being manufactured from a minimum amount of parts.

A further object of the instant invention is to provide a novel table assembly having simple parts which can be cheaply and readily manufactured.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel shelved table assembly having parts which are so made that they can be quickly and easily assembled without the need of special tools or special skill on the part of the person assembling the table.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel shelved table having parts which before assemblage or after dismantlement can be placed in a small package or container for the purposes of storage or shipment from one place to another.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel shelved table, wherein the use of external fastening elements such as glue, nails, bolts, screws, etc. can be dispensed with.

A final object of this invention is to provide a novel table top having specially designed apertures therein for anchoring articles such as vases to the table whereby when the table is inadvertently shaken or jarred, such articles will not be upset.

These and other objects will be more apparent by reference to the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the appended drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the unique shelved table of the instant invention;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the table shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an elevational sectional view of the table when taken along lines 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is anelevational sectional view of the table taken alqnglines 4;-4 of Figure 2; and

Figure 5 is an exploded view of the table of the instant invention showing the relationship of the several parts immediately prior to assembly.

By referring to the drawings it will be observed that the shelved table of the instant invention is comprised of a pair of side base members 1. Each of these base members is so formed from a single piece of material such as thin plywood as to include an elongated floor engaging web portion 2 and leg elements 3 which project vertically upward from each extremity thereof. Each leg element 3' is provided with a plurality of upwardly projecting spaced fingers 4 at-thefree ends thereof; Each leg 3 is thussuitably reinforced through the medium of the web 2, and any upward thrust upon the legs 3 is equally distributed by the web on each leg. The function of fingers 4 will be discussed later.

The table is also provided with a pair of end frames 5. Each end frame which is likewise preferably made from a single piece of relatively thin plywood includes a web portion 6 and leg elements I, which project downwardly from each end thereof, these leg elements being reinforced by web 6 in the same manner as the leg elements 3 are reinforced by the web 2 on each base member. In addition, web 6 serves to distribute any downward thrust upon legs 1 equally upon each leg.

The several leg elements 1 are also provided at the free ends thereof with a plurality of down wardly projecting spaced fingers 8.

These latter fingers 8 on leg elements 1 of the end frames .as indicated in'Figures l and 5 are adapted to interlock at a transverse angle with the upwardly projecting fingers 4 on the legs 3 of the side base members, when fingers 8 are thrust downward between fingers 4 until the base 9 of the elongated slot in each leg 1 of an end frame comes into contact with the base ll of the elongated slot I2 in each leg 3 of a side base frame;

This interlocking of thebase members and end frames can be simply done and when interlocked these members form a strong foundation for a shelf I3 and a table top [4.

The shelf [3 of the table is mounted thereon by means of slots I in each of the leg elements I of the end frames. By referring to Figures 1 and 5 it will be noted that these slots are located on the inner margins of leg elements 1 intermediate the ends thereof. If desired, shelf It may also be provided on its outer margins with similar slots at the points where it is engaged by the slots of leg elements 1 to further insure a rigid joinder of the shelf and each leg element 1, when the base of the slot in the shelf is brought into contact with the base of a icoacting slot l5 in each leg element 1.

It wil al o n iced by r r i p ularly to Figures ,3, 4 and 5 that the table top H! is pro-.- vidcd n the underside th reof wi h an elongated ec s ed po tion ,1 at each nd. e Within which the top part of an end frame 5 such as a shoulder portion I! is adapted to be inserted.

, If desired, and to further anchor the table top Hi to each end frame, suitable latching lugs I8,

4 which may be advantageously made from plywood scraps can be pivotally attached to the undersurface of the table top at points spaced inwardly from the recessed portions l6, and they are adapted to be pivotally inserted within a coacting elongated recessed portion or groove 19 located on the inner face of the web 6 of each end frame.

Wh n isassemb th table h lat h lu s l8 are moved outof engagement with grooves I9 and the top is lifted off of the end frames by disengaging shoulders H from grooves l6 in the bottom of the table. The shelf Hi can then be disengaged-from the end frames, after their removal from the side base members.

By using the aforesaid interlocking arrangementas the. means for joining the several members of the table together it will be noted that each member serves to reinforce and strengthen its adjacent member, and a compact strong and rigid shelved table is provided. Each of the severalslots in thelegmemberst and l are only of suiiicient width to provide a snug fit for the elements or parts which arereceivable therein.

The top of the table, as will be noted by re! ferring to Figures 1, 2 and 5, isprovided with a hole 23 within which avase or container for flows ers may be inserted and when anchored therein, the'vase will not become dislodged or knocked off of the table when .it is jarred or bumped.

A keyway or cutout 25 may likewise be provided in one end of the top Ill so as to serve as a second holder for another vase or the like. This latter cutout section may alsobe advantageously em.- ployed for holdingor retaining the stems of flow? ers and the like located in a container which rests on shelf I3.

Although the preferred embodiment of the in:- vention contemplates that the several parts of the table be made from plywood whichlends it self to simple and easy fabrication, it is obvious that other materials can also be used.

However, plywood is most advantageously suited for such a table construction because of its low cost, availability and the ease with which it can be worked. I

Furthermore, although plywood having a thick ness of about of an inch is the usual size of plywood employed in the making of furniture of this kind, it has been found that because of the inherent strength and rigidity afforded the table because of the interlocking-arrangement of the several parts or. sections of the table of them.- stant inventiomand the. web portions provided for the end frames and side base members, that plywood having, a .thickness within the range of %-to of an inch can also .be used with ex cellent results for all the par-ts; In practice, plywood of /2 an inch thickness has been found advantageous, This savings in material is obvious and can in turn be passed on to the-con;- sumer.

Instead of one shelf, a plurality of shelves could be used for the table.

Various other changes and modifications can be made in the invention without departing from the spirit an d scope thereof; as defined by the appended claims, wherein:

What is claimed is:

1 A knockdown table assembly of the type described comprising the combination ofa pair of side base members, each'of said side base members being comprised, of a floor v engaging elgn gated web portion and leg elements projecting upwardly fromeach 'end'of said web portioneach of said leg elements in turn being provided with a plurality of upwardly projecting spaced fingers at the free ends thereof, a pair of end frames, each of said end frames being comprised of a web portion and leg elements projecting downwardly from each end thereof and at a transverse angle to the upwardly projecting legs of the said side base members, each of said downwardly projecting leg elements on said end frames also being provided with a slot on its inner marginal edge intermediate the ends thereof and a plurality of spaced downwardly projecting fingers at the free ends thereof which are adapted to interlock at an angle with the upwardly projecting fingers on the legs of the said side base members, a flat shelf member adapted to be engaged adjacent the corners thereof by the said slots located in the legs of the said end frames intermediate the ends of the said legs, and a table top provided with transverse elongated recessed portions on the underside thereof adjacent the ends thereof, mounted upon the webs of said end frames in super-imposed relationship to said shelf, the tops of said webs of the end frames being receivable within the said recessed portions on the underside of said table top.

2. A knockdown table assembly of the type described comprising the combination of a pair of side base members, each of said base members being comprised of a floor engaging elongated web portion and leg elements projecting upwardly from each end of said web portion, each of said leg elements in turn being provided with a plurality of upwardly projecting spaced fingers at the free ends thereof, a pair of end frames, each of said end frames being comprised of a web portion having an elongated recess on the inner face thereof and leg elements projecting downwardly from each end of said web and at a transverse angle to the upwardly projecting legs on the said side base members, each of said downwardly projecting leg elements on said end frames also being provided with a slot on its inner marginal edge intermediate the ends thereof and a plurality of spaced downwardly projecting fingers at the free ends thereof which are adapted to interlock at an angle with the upwardly projecting fingers 0n the legs of the said side base members, a flat shelf member receivable between the legs of the end frames and adapted to be engaged adjacent the corners thereof by the said slots located in the said intermediate portions of the legs on said end frames, and a table top mounted upon the webs of said end frames, said table top also being provided with elongated recessed portions on the underside thereof adjacent the ends thereof and a plurality of latching lugs also pivotally attached to the underside thereof in spaced relationship to said recessed portions, said latching lugs being insertable within the recessed portions on the inner face of the webs of said end frames, when the tops of said last-mentioned webs are inserted within the recesses in the underside of said table top.

PHILIP C. CURTIS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 102,398 Hibbs Apr. 26, 1870 238,452 Sorenson Mar. 1, 1881 1,968,880 Ebert Aug. 7, 1934 2,481,671 John et a1. Sept. 13, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 496,534 Great Britain Jan. 6, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US102398 *Apr 26, 1870 Improvement in stationery furniture
US238452 *Jan 11, 1881Mar 1, 1881 Cabinet
US1968880 *Jan 10, 1933Aug 7, 1934Oberly & NewellArticle display device
US2481671 *Dec 11, 1945Sep 13, 1949Allen John EugeneArticle of furniture
GB496534A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3106901 *Dec 13, 1962Oct 15, 1963Locek Joseph CTable construction
US3971327 *Jan 27, 1975Jul 27, 1976Critchett Paul JMultipurpose table
US6101954 *Dec 17, 1998Aug 15, 2000Rosemount Office Systems, Inc.Worktop and frame construction
US6394006 *Dec 27, 2000May 28, 2002University Of Central FloridaGarden table
US20140084765 *Sep 23, 2012Mar 27, 2014Michael D. RileyConvertible furniture system base and modular applications including armchairs, tables, and storage cabinets
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/101, 108/159
International ClassificationA47B3/00, A47B3/06, A47B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B31/00, A47B3/06, A47B2230/0085
European ClassificationA47B3/06, A47B31/00