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Publication numberUS2656157 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1953
Filing dateFeb 16, 1950
Priority dateFeb 16, 1950
Publication numberUS 2656157 A, US 2656157A, US-A-2656157, US2656157 A, US2656157A
InventorsWasielewski Eugene W
Original AssigneeWasielewski Eugene W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat transfer element supported against external or internal pressures
US 2656157 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1953 w w 5 ws 2,656,157

HEAT TRANs FER ELEMENT SUPPORTED AGAINST EXTERNAL OR INTERNAL PRESSURES Filed Feb. 16, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Oct. 20, 1953 w, w s ws 2,656,157

HEAT TRANSFER ELEMENT SUPPORTED AGAINST EXTERNAL 0R INTERNAL PRESSURES 2 Sheets-Shet 2 Filed' Feb. 16, 1950 III I I III I Il Ii lll tag, t i brb i tt' i to r due n heore el ,7.

asunpro iesh attraes r chamsieristicsienszeto th aeqemnee iee-d f ri the Patented Oct. 20, 1953 neAT T ANSFER EL MENT SUBPORTED AGAINST EXT-ERN PR ssUR s Eugene Weiii e fiette Enlist Ol ie emllie ioe ebruery 16, 1'Q Qa Q 1i-E 1 Qr}4 i55l sec. 2

V fhi iny ention relates to heat exchangers of the y e tr a e ee iere eurs i vterentials in practice, such as forexample infls ome exhaust qqol is e missed q e ie Pow plants- The obj eet of the present invention is to devise a noyel construction? of efiective' yet simple and li h weig t hee ei l ee a ab r use wit fiel s i ekii ie ly high P e s re a temre eiure ers s snecifl e lrtee Object so construct a heat exchanger unit including a tube system, are also used for bracing the i sthigh pressure diiferenther andgmore specific.object's will appear in heicn wina detail dfisrii iisefof one mv of th m-d vice ehstresated in. eq m h Fig. is a sectionalview taken on the line 4--4 reigi-a Fig. 5 is another sectional view, taken on the {5 -5 of: Fig. 2,

6; 1 and 8 are detail sectional views taken lines 66, 1-4 and '8--8 respectively of flfiifg. 5,- and Fig. 9 isan enlarged detail sectional view taken on the line se of-F-ig. 3.

'Ihepresent form of the device contemplates the assembly of any number of sections l, 2 and 3 which may be made to one or more standard constructions adaptable for connection in series as shown, using a standard form of construction for each end section 4 and 5, adaptable for connection to the ends of the sections l and 3 respectively, to form the heat exchanger assembly.

The present device is a water-tube type heat exchanger with straight tubes which operate at pressures below atmosphere and are, therefore, subject to external pressures. The water-tube type exchanger is especially suitable for cooling gases at high temperatures above 2000 F.

Normally, when using known cooler construction, the external side walls thereof must ordinarily be heavily braced against the external or heuse of very thin walls weight oftheunit as well" an I2 d 1s re p ctive y;

f protection canta a; a .9. wit f ac r'yj m itntainew Title 53}?- S; lide. (la-12),.

2 internal. pressures that may be] encountered- Q WQH PP Y en t al test o i i hee er e se h h ft Y charaet eristic v. 3 E 1 te dfby the. flea strueture that is usiia Maegan v reduce the required c ng'l h In. the present eonstru im t as illustra h a i sll ns r ub s ilanl I 5, 7" 11. iently in alternate rows re gn ng" atilll other, for bracing the alls aajn 9-1. pecti by fixing their ends to those wall means such as Welding at It! by rolling, threaded connej structionjpermits theus sacrificin s r n th requireme t thus taken entire y, by tiiee ieia" andilii, through the. baflles. I t a d tend between the inner o I Order q rqt t he nner wal s? an 9 furthenwater-tube walls [6 (Fig.9) ma" r d an laid in: uc man e a m e extr m ly hotgases that m if, enet life. the

sew lls 8f andfa. h a dis 1e. Wat we l, et e esed, at th 9w, m atu .end def theheatexcha with tionslil at thelhighte pera am ne: ll t thes ans. .b.9 u% d for ea e le v y men, em a- .tures, exceeding 4000f" F; and ressur' t ei H eb ui A; @935 i flu d may be establi h show through the rows of tubesfifandfl and ardu'nd the .bailles I14 audit? or inar ly otherway d 'd al featuresof noveltyheinjgfinjus g the heat efxchangerv tubes "6. and I. arran e; at right angles not "only for conducting" tli fliiid therein but also to serve as braces for the 0pposite walls obviating the use of heavy walls and special bracing structure for high temperature and pressure differential conditions. Another feature is the use of the water wall for protection against high temperatures as well as further reinforcement of the wall structure so it may be made of very thin material, the headers for the tubes of this water wall being placed in the lowtemperature end of the heat exchanger, and the possible use of refractory material, if desired, between the water wall and the inner walls 8 and 9.

Coolant, for example water, patterns established in use of the heat exchanger shown are as follows: The water wall [6 obtains its supply through an inlet line 30 (Fig. 6) which is connected to manifold [8. After circulating through the tubes of the water wall H5, or in the illustrated case, the tubes of the three individual but connected water walls, the water enters manifold I'l nested with manifold I8 (Fig. 7), and discharges through outlet line 32.

Separate from the above described is the flow in the water jackets (Figs. 2 and 3). Here, water enters inlet 34 and flows to distributor 36 (Fig. 5) whence the water is delivered to the jackets of section 3 through suitable pipes. After passing through the jackets in the flow pattern shown by the direction arrows of Figs. 2 and 3, the jacket arrangement of parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of 'the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

What is claimed is:

1. In a heat exchanger, a plurality of heat exchange sections coupled together, each heat exchanger section comprising an inner wall arranged to define a central passage to conduct a hot fluid, the passage having open ends for through passage of hot fiuid, a first row of coolant carrying heat transfer conduits, each conduit being fastened at both of its ends to opposed portions of said wall, a second row of coolant carrying heat transfer conduits, each of which is fastened to other opposed portions of said wall,

said rows of conduits being arranged at substantially right angles to each other to thereby brace said wall against the forces of internal and external pressures, an outer wall surrounding said inner wall, means fixing said walls in spaced relationship to each other to define a jacket, said inner wall being provided with a plurality of apertures which are arranged to communicate the bores of said conduits with said jacket, an

. .inlet line connected to said jacket, an outlet line connected with said jacket and having a coupling thereon to connect with the inlet line of an adjacent section, a plurality of tubes arranged to constitute a water wall, said tubes being located interiorly of and parallel to said inner wall, and inlet and outlet means connected with and for said plurality of tubes.

2. The construction of claim 1 wherein said outlet means comprises a header located within said passage, and an outlet line connected to said header.

3. The construction of claim 2 wherein said inlet means comprises a second header connected to said tubes and provided with an inlet line, and said headers being nested with each other so as to transfer heat between each other, one of said headers extending entirely around the inner surface of a cross sectional part of said passage.

4. In a heat exchanger, a heat exchanger section comprising an inner wall arranged to define a central passage to conduct a hot fluid and having an inlet and an outlet end, a first row of coolant carrying heat transfer conduits, each conduit being fastened at both of its ends to opposed portions of said wall, a second row of at substantially right angles to each other to thereby brace said wall against theforces of internal and external pressures, an outer wall surrounding said inner wall, means fixing said walls in spaced relationship to each other to define a jacket, said inner wall being provided with a plurality of apertures which are arranged to communicate the bores of said conduits with said jacket, an inlet line connected to said jacket, an outlet line connected with said jacket, a plurality of tubes, each tube being U shaped and arranged within said inner wall adjacent to the inner surface thereof, said tubes constituting a water wall and having their ends located at the low temperature outlet end of said passage, means constituting an outlet for said tubes connected with one end of each tube, and means constituting an inlet for said tubes comprising a header located in said passage and connected to the other end of each tube.

5. The construction of claim 4 and a lining of refractory material disposed between said tubes and the inner surface of said inner wall and at least partially held in place by said tubes.

EUGENE W. WASIELEWSKL References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 930,341 Berry Aug. 10, 1909 945,130 Lycan Jan. 4, 1910 1,633,663 Hardison June 28, 1927 1,809,915 Smith June 16, 1931 1,931,679 Price Oct. 24, 1933 2,042,618 Murray June 2, 1936 2,063,441 Kerr Dec. 8, 1936 2,325,583 Artsay Aug. 3, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US930341 *May 11, 1908Aug 10, 1909Raymond W FrawleyBoiler.
US945130 *Feb 26, 1908Jan 4, 1910William Shields LycanWater-tube boiler.
US1633663 *Apr 18, 1921Jun 28, 1927First Nat Bank & Trust CoHigh-pressure steam boiler
US1809915 *Aug 13, 1930Jun 16, 1931Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoCondenser
US1931679 *Apr 27, 1931Oct 24, 1933Griscom Russell CoClosure means for pressure containers
US2042618 *May 31, 1923Jun 2, 1936Metropolitan Eng CoBoiler
US2063441 *Jul 22, 1930Dec 8, 1936Babcock & Wilcox CoSuperheated steam cooling device
US2325583 *May 2, 1939Aug 3, 1943Foster Wheeler CorpVapor generator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2869834 *Apr 10, 1956Jan 20, 1959Patterson Kelley CoHeat exchanger
US3033534 *Jan 29, 1959May 8, 1962Gen Motors CorpToroidal heat exchangers
US3153446 *Aug 12, 1960Oct 20, 1964United Aircraft CorpHeat exchanger
US3453087 *Jun 25, 1964Jul 1, 1969Girdler CorpModular reformer furnace
US3525199 *May 8, 1968Aug 25, 1970Cottrell Res IncSystem integrating bag filter shake manifold with casing structural system
US3986549 *Jul 14, 1975Oct 19, 1976Modine Manufacturing CompanyHeat exchanger
US4279296 *Mar 8, 1979Jul 21, 1981Combustion Engineering, Inc.Segmented ring header
US4553585 *Oct 22, 1982Nov 19, 1985Bayerische Motoren Werke AktiengesellschaftCooling arrangement for internal combustion engines with combined seawater-fresh water cooling
US5020479 *Aug 29, 1989Jun 4, 1991The Kansai Electronic Power Company Inc.Watertube boiler and its method of combustion
US5944089 *May 26, 1994Aug 31, 1999Roland; Russel AnthonyThermal storage systems for buildings
DE1063188B *Sep 6, 1956Aug 13, 1959Elettrocarbonium SpaWaermeaustauscher aus undurchlaessigem Kohlenstoff oder Graphit
EP0283634A1 *Dec 29, 1987Sep 28, 1988FRIGOTECNICA INDUSTRIALE CHIAVENNA S.p.A.An eutectic solution cold accumulator
EP0728508A1 *Feb 24, 1995Aug 28, 1996BEFS PROKEM (Société Anonyme)Crystallizer
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/134.1, 122/235.11, 122/494, 165/174, 165/145
International ClassificationF28D7/00, F28D7/06
Cooperative ClassificationF28D7/06
European ClassificationF28D7/06