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Publication numberUS2657510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1953
Filing dateOct 14, 1949
Priority dateOct 14, 1949
Publication numberUS 2657510 A, US 2657510A, US-A-2657510, US2657510 A, US2657510A
InventorsLewis Harold P
Original AssigneeJames Irvine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for packaging commodities
US 2657510 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1953 H. P. LEWIS 7,5 0

' APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES Filed Oct. 14, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet l Snventor attorney Nov. 3, 1953 I H. P. LEWIS 2,657,510

APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES N Bu 7- Gttorneg Nov. 3,1953 I H. P. LEWIS 2,657,510

APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES Filed 001;. 14, 1949 s sheets-sheet a Zinmmtcr Nov. 3, 1953 H. P. LEWIS 2,657,510

APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES Filed Oct. 14, 1949 v e Sheets-Sheet 4 noentor I (Ittomeg Nov. 3, 1953 H. P. LEWIS I 2,657,510

' APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES Filed Oct. 14, 1949 s Sheets-Sheet 5 Nov. 3, 1953 H. P. LEWIS 1 575 APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING COMMODITIES Filed Oct. 14, 1949 s Sheets-She a; e

Ennenfor' Patented Nov. 3, 1953 APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING CODIIVIODITIES Harold P. Lewis, N ewtown, Pa., assignor, by mesne assignments, to James Irvine, Snug Valley,

Wayne, Pa.

Application October 14, 1949, Serial No. 121,297

My invention relates to apparatus for packaging commodities such as tea, coffee, small pellets, candies, nuts and like materials in packages made of paper, cellophane or other packaging material which is inherently heat sealing or heat seal coated.

The primary object of my invention is the provision of a packaging machine of the above character adapted to be adjusted quickly and simply for making packages of different length and width.

Another object of my invention resides in a novel combination of an adjustable knife and electric eye whereby packages of difierent lengths can be made with a very simple adjustment.

A further object of my invention has to do with the centering of printed matter or the like on the packages.

In my application Serial No. 719,561 filed December 31, 1946, now U. S. Patent No. 2,522,682, I have illustrated more comprehensively a machine of the general character under consideraation and the apparatus disclosed in my present application is particularly adapted for use in a machine such as that disclosed in said application Serial No. 719,561, now U. S. Patent No. 2,522,682.

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a packaging machine constructed in accordance with my invention with certain parts shown in section;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational View looking toward the right in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a sectional elevational view taken substantially on the line 36 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a plan section taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a more or less diagrammatic elevational view of certain parts of the device showing them in one position of operation for making packages of one size;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 but showing the parts in another position of operation;

Fig. 8 is a View similar to Figs. 6 and '7 but showing the parts in still another position of operation;

Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are views similar to Figs. 6, 7 and 8 but illustrating the parts positioned for making packages of larger size; and

Figs. 12, 13 and 14 are views similar to Figs. 6, '7 and 8 but illustrating the parts positioned for making packages of double length.

The machine comprises in general a frame having side members ID, a top member II, and

8 Claims. (01. 53-43) a base member l2; a hopper l3 which receives measured quantities of the material to be packaged from. an automatic feeding device (not shown), such, for example, as a well known turret type feeder; an oval feed tube l4 leading from the hopper I3 to the point I5 where the material will be discharged into a package being formed; side or edge seal rolls or dies It for forming longitudinal seals ii along the edges of the package; transverse or cross seal rolls or dies 18 for forming end seals at the top and bottom edges of the packages; a rotary knife I9 for cutting off the packages; and a main drive shaft 23 receiving drive from any suitable source of power as by means of the drive pulley 2|.

The packages are made of any suitable material which can be sealed by the application of heat or pressure, or both heat and pressure. For convenience, I will refer to paper but it will be understood that other materials such as cellophane are available. The paper 22 is fed to the machine from rolls mounted at the upper right and left hand portion of the machine, a part of the right hand roll being indicated in dot and dash lines at 23 in Fig. 2. From the rolls thepaper is led over rollers 24, 25 and 26 and then downwardly along the sides of the feed tube I4 in opposed parallel relation on opposite sides of feed tube I4, as shown at 22c (see particularly Figs. 3 and ,4). The edges 221) are then brought together by the edge seal rolls [6 to form a longitudinal marginal seal IT at either side of the paper, as best seen in Fig. 5.

The edge seal rolls 16 are each provided with a peripherally serrated end flange 21 of a width equal to the width of seal desired and with a portion 28 of reduced diameter which is hollowed out to receive a donut-shaped heatingelement 29 for heating the roll toprovide the heat seal. One pair of these rolls, as viewed in Fig. 1, is relatively adjustably secured to a cross shaft 30, i. e., the righthand pair of Figs. 2 and 3, and the other or lefthand pair is similarly relatively adjustably secured to a cross shaft 3|. The rolls can be slid axially of the shafts to adjust them in accordance with the width of paper being employed, and they are held in adjusted position by means of set screws 32 (see Fig. l).

The shaft 30 is mounted adjacent its end in ball bearings 33 carried by hearing blocks 34 rigidly secured to guide members 35 by bolts 36, the guide members 35 being secured to the side frame members 10 by bolts 31. The other cross 3 shaft 3| is mounted in ball bearings 38 carried by movable bearing blocks 39 which are mounted for sliding movement in the guide members 35. The bearing blocks 39 are spring urged toward the fixed bearing blocks 34 by means of springs 40 connected at one end to pins 4| fixed in the side members ID and at the other end to the point between a pair of links 42, 43, the link 42 being connected to the bearing block at 44 and the link 43 being connected to the frame member at 45. Through this arrangement the rolls on the cross shaft 3| are spring urged toward the rolls on the cross shaft so that as the packaging material passds between the serrated flanges 21 of the rolls a crimped heat seal is made under pressure. This pressure gripping of the paper also serves to feed it through the machine and the longitudinal sealing rolls constitute the sole feeding means for the paper.

It will be noted that the guide rolls 26 are very close to feed tube #4. so that the paper will be guided to a position very close to, or actually in contact with the feed tube. Thus the opposed layers of the paper will advance in substantially parallel relation to the edge sealing rolls.

After leaving the edge seal rolls I6 the paper, now in the form of a tube with its longitudinal edges sealed, is fed downwardly to the cross seal rolls i8 where a cross seal 45 is formed. These rolls H! are each provided with four sealing or crimping surfaces 4'!- spaced 90 degrees apart circumferentially of the rolls and extending the full length of the rolls. Ths circumferential extent of the engaging sealing surfaces is such that the width of seal formed is suflicient to provide a top seal for one package and a bottom seal for the next package when they are cut off by the knife l9. These rolls are flattened at 48 so that when they assume the positions illustrated in Figs. 1, 2', 3, 6, 9 and 12 a space is provided therebetween for the passage of the filled package being formed.

The mounting of the cross seal rolls W- is similar to the mounting of the edge seal rolls Hi, i. e., the shaft 49 for the righthand roll l8, as viewed in Figs. 2 and 3, is mounted adjacent its end portions in ball bearings 59 carried by bearing blocks 5i rigidly secured to guide members 52 by bolts 53, the guide members 52- being secured to the side frame members H) bybol-ts 54. The shaft 55 for the lefthand roll I8 is mounted in ball bearings 56; carried by movable bearing blocks 51 which are mounted for sliding movement in guide members 58. The bearing blocks 51, are spring urged toward the fixed bearing blocks 5,! by means of springs 5'9 and links- 60, 9t operating the same as the springs 49- and links 42 4.3 above described. In this instance, however, it is to be noted that movement of thelefthand roll toward the righthand roll islimited by the engagement of the driving gears 62' and 63 for the rolls (see Fig. 3), these gears being mounted on the shafts 49 and 55 adjacent their righthand ends as viewed in- F'ig. 1.

carried at the ends of the edge seal and cross seal shafts and from which wires lead to the heating elements. The rings and the brushes are mounted on suitable insulating blocks 29d and 296.

Before describing the driving mechanism for the rolls l6 and 18 for the knife l9, it is pointed out that feed of the paper andof the formed packages is continuous, but that operation of the transverse seal and knife is intermittent (as will be later explained) and that the operation of the knife is so timed that it will cut off each completed package at the middle of a cross seal as it is fed to'the knife.- The turret type feeder is synchronized with the driving mechanism of the machine'so that a charge is fed from the feed tube il fit after each cross seal is formed.

The knife mechanism comprises a rotary knife *9 and a stationary blade or anvil 64. The knife I9 is mounted on a sleeve 65 by means of screws 66 which secure the knife against the flat surface 6! of the sleeve. The screws 66 pass through slots 68 in the knife whereby the knife may be adjusted on the sleeve to compensate for wear due. to. sharpening of the knife and to obtain the proper setting with relation to the anvil 54. The sleeve 65 is adjustably mounted on the knife shaft 69 to enable the knife to be set at any desired position circumferentially of the shaft for purposes hereinafter appearing, a set screw [0 being provided to lock the sleeve in its. adjusted position. The blade or anvil 64 ismounted on a bar H extending crosswise of the machine and secured to the side members If! by screws 12 which are tightened after the anvil is set in its desired angular position. The blade is adjustably secured to the bar 11- by means of screws. 13 and slots 14. Thus the anvil may be adjusted to compensate for wear and also to provide clearance for the packages to prevent them from catching on the anvil as they are fed downward- 1y.

Referring now to. the driving mechanism, it will be seen that a gear 15 secured on the drive shaft 20 meshes with an idler gear 16 mounted on a stub shaft 11, which in turn meshes with a gear 18 secured on the sleeve of the driving member 19 of a clutch C of the typ shown in Patent No. 2,140,737, well known in the art as a Hilliard single revolution clutch. The gear 18 meshes with the larger gear 89 of a compound gear mounted on the stub shaft 8-! and the smaller gear 82 of this compound gear meshes with a gear 83 mounted for free rotation on the end: of the cross seal shaft 49. The gear 83 drives the gear 84 secured on the edge seal shaft 30 through the medium of a pinion 85 mounted on the stub shaft 86.

Power is applied to the clutch C by means of the gear 18 secured on the driving member 19 and this causes the driving member (-9 to rotate continuously. The hub 81 carried the trip mechanism of the clutch and is keyed on the knife shaft. 69 which as will now appear is. driven in termittently. For this purpose the clutch is. provided with a. trip. lever 88 adapted to engage the step 89 of a trip cam 90 as shown in Fig. 2. With the lever in this position the driving member 19 after rotating a distance of approximately 5' degrees releases the clutch and swings the trip cam 90 on pivot pin 9! to move the trip block 92 so as to rotate thev cage 93 with respect to the hub 81 and force the clutch rollers 94 out of driving contact. The clutch remains in released position as long as the trip lever 88 is in contact with the trip cam 90 but when the trip lever is withdrawn as by means of the electrc-magnet or solenoid 95 the spring 96 snaps the trip cam into driving position and the clutch picks up the load, 1. e., it effects drive of the knife shaft 99 for one revolution when the step 89 of the trip cam engages the trip lever 88 and causes it to stop until again released by the electro-magnet.

1 The cross seal rolls I9 receive their drive from the knife shaft 69 by means of a gear 91 secured on the knife shaft which meshes with the larger gear 98 of a compound gear mounted on the stub shaft 99. The smaller gear I09 of this compound gear meshes with the gear 62 secured on the cross seal shaft 49 and this gear in turn meshes with the gear 93 secured on the cross seal shaft 55. In this particular instance, since cross seal rolls having four sealing dies are employed, the ratio of the gearing just described is four to one thus driving the cross seal rolls one quarter of a revocut.

The train of gears 15, 16, 18, 89, 92, 93, 85 and 84 above described are also of four to one ratio i,

so that the edge seal rolls [6 rotate one-fourth of the speed of the drive shaft 29; however, since the clutch does not control the train of gears,

these rolls rotate continuously to efiect constant feed of the paper.

Referring now to the control means for the clutch C, it will be seen that the electro-rnagnet 95 is controlled by photoelectric cell cr electric eye [0| (see Fig. 2) having a source of light 102 associated therewith. The paper passes between the eye and source of light and is provided with eye spots at spaced intervals as indicated at I03, the spacing being determined by the length of package being made. In instances where the packaging material is provided wth printed matter repeated for each package the eye spot may be incorporated in the printing.

Referring now particularly to the diagrammatic views of Figs. 6, '7 and 8, it is pointed out that the parts are shown in three different oper- -ative positions for making packages of what may be termed standard size. In Fig. 6 the step 89 of the trip cam 99 is shown in engagement with the trip lever 88 and the knife l9 and cross seal rolls [8 are in their stopped position. However, since the edge seal rolls l6 rotate contintarily energized and the trip lever 88 was disengaged from the step 89 to allow the trip cam 99 to rotate and effect engagement of the clutch and rotation of the knife shaft. The knife is shown in the position of cutting off the package B and the cross seal rolls I8 are just starting to make a cross seal.

In Fig. 8 the knife is shown further advanced in its cycle of operation and the cross seal rolls are forming a cross seal. The knife then con- 6 tinues to rotate until it reaches the position shown in Fig. 6 at which time the trip lever 88 again engages the step 89 of the trip cam 90 and stops the knife and cross seal rolls. At this time the next eye spot has moved to the position where it is just ready to pass to the electric eye. The initial setting of the knife circumferentially of the shaft is at a point such that by the time it reaches the cutting off position shown in Fig. '7 it will make the cut in the center of the cross seal, and as pointed out the spacing of the eye spot is determined by the length of package to be cut. By incorporating the eye spot in or in proper relation to the printed matter of each print repeat, the printed matter may be accurately centered on the package. The importance of this will be realized when it is understood that in the process of printing the repeats on a long roll of the packaging material expansion and contraction of the material takes place. This has been found to be of suflicient amount to cause the prints, even though centralized on the packages at the start of a roll, to be off center in subsequent packages in the absence of means for controlling the point of cut-off from the prints. Through the practice of my invention this difiiculty is overcome.

In Figs. 9, 10 and 11 the parts are shown in three different positions for making packages of substantially one and one-half times the length of the packages shown in Figs. 6, '7 and 8. In this instance, it will be seen that the initial setting of the knife, as shown in Fig. 9, is such that it has a greater travel than in Fig. 6 before the point of cut-off is reached. The eye spot I99 is in the same relation to the electric eye as in Fig. 6, but the spacing of the eye spots has been correspondingly increased.

In Fig. 11 the knife is shown advanced to its cutting-off position and the sealing surfaces of the rolls 98 are about to leave the seal just made. As the knife completes its cycle, it again reaches the stop position of Fig. 9 and the next package to be cut off is fed to the position shown. It will be seen from the foregoing that in adapting the machine for packages longer than the minimum length, the spacing of the eye spots is increased and the only adjustment of the mechanism necessary is that of rotating the knife carrying sleeve 65 to its new position and securing it in place by means of the set screw Hi.

In Figs. l2, l3 and 14 the parts are shown in three different positions corresponding to the positions of Figs. 6, '7 and 8 for making packages of double length. It should be noted that in making double length packages, or in fact any multiple length packages, the setting of the knife remains the same as for the single length package, it being only necessary to increase the spacing of the eye spots to correspond with the multiple length.

The following points are to be noted.

(1) The feed of the packaging material is constant as this is effected by the edge sealing rollers which revolve at a constant speed.

(2) The knife shaft and transverse sealing roller shaft to which the knife is connected by a gear train have fixed centres. When packages are to be made in lengths which are multiples of lengths of the minimum size package, no adjustment of the knife is required.

(3) When packages are to be made which are not in multiples of lengths of the minimum size package, the desired length of package can be particularly packages.

secured by the simple adjustment of moving the knife .circumferentially of the shaft on which it is mounted. No change in relation of knife shaft and transverse seal roller shaft is required (4) The length of package and relation of printed matter thereon to the end seals is accurately determined by the spacing of the photoelectric cell controlling indicia ion the packaging material.

(5) The apparatus can be quickly adjusted to accommodate different width packaging material by simple adjustment of the marginal sealin rollers.

Thus .it is possible, within limits, to produce packages of various widths and lengths on the same machine, and the machine can be quickly and easily changed to produce different size So .far as I am aware, it has hitherto been impossible in commercial machines to change the production from one size package to another without considerable alteration of the machine.

The adaptability of any machine in the production of different size packages would be most useful when the machine is used in custom packaging, i. .e., in the case Where owners of the machines package goods for a number of different manufacturers who desire a package having different sizes and characteristics.

Iclaim:

1. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a transverse seal forming member comprising a pair of oppositely disposed intermittently rotating rolls mounted on shafts bey-ond the end of said feed tube and having axially extending opposed sealing surfaces adapted to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween; an intermittently operating knife member mounted on a rotatable shaft beyond the end of the transverse seal forming member, the knife being circumferentially adjustable with respect to the shaft on which it is mounted; means for driving the shafts on which the transverse sealing members and the knife are mounted intermittently in synchronism and means responsive to indications on the packaging material to control the intermittent rotation of said shafts independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

2. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodity; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; a pair of continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact between the flanges to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; at least one pair of opposed 8 flanges being slidably mounted on the shafts; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members beyond the end of said feed tube having opposed sealing surfaces adapted to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact between said surfaces to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently operating knife beyond said transverse seal forming member to cut the packaging material centrally of a transverse seal into separate packages; and means responsive to indications on the packaging material to control the operation of said transverse seal forming member and said knife independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

3. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges adapted to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact between the flanges to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members beyond the end of said feed tube having opposed sealing surfaces adapted to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact between said surfaces to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently operating knife beyond said transverse seal forming member to cut the packaging material centrally of the transverse seals into separate packages; and means controlling the frequency of operation of the transverse seal forming rollers and the knife independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

4. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members mounted on shafts and disposed along the feed path adjacent the end of said tube having opposed sealing surfaces to press transverse portions of the packaging material .into contact therebetween to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently operating knife disposed along the path of feed adjacent said transverse seal forming members to cut the packaging material centrally of the transverse seals into separate packages; and means responsive to indications on the packaging material controlling the frequency of operation of said transverse seal forming member and said knife independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

5. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members mounted on shafts and disposed along the feed path adjacent the end of said tube having opposed sealing surfaces to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to forma succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently operating knife disposed along the path of feed adjacent said transverse seal forming members to cut the packaging material centrally of the transverse seals into separate packages; and means responsive to indications on the packaging material to control the operation of said transverse seal forming member and said knife.

6. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members mounted on shafts and disposed along the feed path adjacent the end of said tube having opposed sealing surfaces to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently rotating knife mounted on a shaft and disposed along the path of feed adjacent said transverse seal forming members to cut the packaging material centrally of the transverse seals into separate packages; a gear train connecting the shafts of the transverse seal forming members and the shaft of the knife; a clutch adapted to drive one of said last mentioned shafts intermittently; andmeans responsive to indications on the packaging material controlling the frequency of operation of said clutch independently of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

7. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; continuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members mounted on 'shafts and disposed along the feed path adjacent the end of said tube having opposed sealing surfaces to press transverse portions of the pack aging material into contact therebetween to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently rotating knife mounted on a shaft and disposed along the path of feed adjacent said transverse seal forming members, the knife being circumferentially adjustable with respect to the shaft on which it is mounted; gear means interconnecting the knife shaft and the shafts of the transverse seal forming elements whereby rotation of the knife is adjustably synchronized with the rotation of the transverse seal forming elements; and means controlling the frequency of operation of the transverse seal forming members and the knife independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

8. Apparatus for packaging commodities in continuously moving packaging material comprising: a feed tube for the commodities; means for guiding opposed layers of the packaging material to opposite sides of said feed tube; con- -tinuously rotating longitudinal seal forming rollers mounted on shafts on opposite sides of said tube and having opposed flanges to press marginal portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a longitudinally sealed tube and providing at least in part means to continuously move the material through the apparatus; a pair of intermittently rotating transverse seal forming members mounted on shafts and disposed along the feed path adjacent the end of said tube having opposed sealing surfaces to press transverse portions of the packaging material into contact therebetween to form a succession of individual commodity packages; an intermittently rotating knife member mounted on a rotatable shaft disposed along the path of feed adjacent said transverse seal forming members, the knife being circumferentially adjustable with respect to the shaft on which it is mounted; gear means interconnecting the knife shaft and the shafts of the transverse seal forming elements whereby rotation of the knife is adjustably synchronized with the rotation of the transverse seal forming elements; an intermittent motion clutch adapted to drive one of said shafts; and means responsive to indications on the packaging material to control the operation of said clutch independently of the operation of the longitudinal seal forming rollers.

HAROLD P. LEWIS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,078,496 Jaite Apr. 27, 1937 2,103,339 Salfisberg Dec. 28, 1937 2,108,767 Fitzgerald Feb. 15, 1938 2,119,670 Fitzgerald June 7, 1938 2,154,521 Maxfield Apr. 18, 1939 2,162,230 Salfisberg June 13, 1939 2,166,643 Salfisberg July 18, 1939 2,191,497 Potdevin Feb, 27, 1940 2,200,971 Sonneborn May 14, 1940 2,208,951 Tamassy July 23, 1940 2,214,593 Mustin Sept. 10, 1940 2,261,591 Rutter Nov. 4, 1941 2,522,682 Lewis Sept. 19, 1950

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2827742 *Dec 10, 1954Mar 25, 1958Bursak George JPackaging apparatus
US2976657 *Oct 16, 1958Mar 28, 1961William S CloudPackaging with variations of package length
US3092942 *Apr 15, 1960Jun 11, 1963Chasman Sydney AApparatus for encapsulating
US3138074 *Feb 1, 1962Jun 23, 1964Crown Zellerbach CorpCutting device
US4074505 *Jan 3, 1977Feb 21, 1978Sealed Air CorporationMethod and apparatus for packaging articles
US4348851 *Jul 3, 1980Sep 14, 1982Bouwe PrakkenPacking machine for the production of filled sealed bags
US5548947 *Jul 6, 1994Aug 27, 1996Thomas J. Lipton Co.Apparatus and method for producing packets
DE1152350B *Aug 18, 1958Aug 1, 1963Roto Wrap Machine CorpVerpackungsmaschine fuer verderbliche Gegenstaende
DE1176049B *Feb 11, 1960Aug 13, 1964Hayssen Mfg CompanyAutomatische Verpackungsmaschine zum Herstellen schlauchfoermiger Packungen
DE1266681B *Mar 2, 1963Apr 18, 1968Noack E Th VerpackungsmaschAnlage zur Verpackung von Heftpflaster
DE1283144B *Aug 8, 1964Nov 14, 1968Aspro Nicholas LtdMaschine zum Verpacken von Waren, insbesondere Tabletten in Einzelpackungen
DE2651131A1 *Nov 9, 1976May 26, 1977Baker Perkins Holdings LtdVerpackungsmaschine
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/75, 53/554, 493/394
International ClassificationB65B41/00, B65B41/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B41/18
European ClassificationB65B41/18