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Publication numberUS2658216 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1953
Filing dateSep 17, 1949
Priority dateSep 17, 1949
Publication numberUS 2658216 A, US 2658216A, US-A-2658216, US2658216 A, US2658216A
InventorsShusett David Robert, Mischa N Berezny
Original AssigneeShusett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic car washer
US 2658216 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. l0, 1953 n. R.sHusE1T ErAL 2,658,216

AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER Filed Sept. 17. 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. l0, 1953 D. R. sHUsETT HAL AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 17, 1949 Nov. 10, 1953 D. R. sHusE-rr ETAL 2,658,216 AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER Filed Sept. 17, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet I5 HTTOP/VTK Patented Nov. l0, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE AUTOMATIC CAR WASHER David Robert Shusett, Beverly Hills, and Mischa N. Berezny, Huntington Park, Calif.; said Berezny assignor to said Shusett Application September 17, 1949, Serial N o. 116,234 11 Claims. (Cl. 15-21) The present invention relates generally to au-y tomatic washers of the type used primarily to wash automobiles, although the broad concept of the invention is not limited solely to car washers, but might be embodied in an apparatus to wash any relatively flat surface such as the outside surfaces of railroad locomotives and cars, ships, buildings, and the like.

The automatic washer is a relatively new innovation in the car washing art, and has heretofore usually comprised a conveyor mechanism to which the front bumpers of the cars are attached by tow chains, and which advances the line of cars slowly past a series of spray nozzles and rotary brushes that Wet down the cars and scrub the outsides thereof, then past other spray nozzles that rinse off the detergent solution loosened soil, and finally past air blast nozzles that blow away any surplus water remaining on the cars. While this type of washer has been relatively successful in reducing the manual labor required per car and in speeding up the washing operation, it has been found that the rotary brushes have certain objectionable features, not the least of which is the high initial and replacement cost of the brushes, in view of the relatively short service life thereof.

Another and perhaps more important objection to the rotary brushes is the frequency with which they have been responsible for damage to projecting accessories on the cars, such as outside rear view mirrors, spot lights, radio antennas, sun Visors, and the like; for which the operator of the car washer is liable and must mito good. Still another shortcoming of the rotary brushes is the fact that, owing to the irregularity complexity of the outer car surfaces. to the laclr of any uniformity between cars of dierent model or maire, there are-areas on practically every car going through the washer that are either missed entirely by the bristles of the rotary brush or are inadequately scrubbed. It has therefore been necessary in the past to maintain a sizeable crew of workers to check constantly on the work done by the. rotary brushes and to scrub any skipped areas by hand. The cost of this manual labor is an important item in the operation oi a car washer, and one of.. the primary objects of the present invention is to provide an automatic car washer which is so flerible and thorough in its operation that practically any passenger car on the road today can be quickly and thoroughly washed withV only a minimum of hand labor, thereby greatly reducing the labor cost, and conrl r- DJ strong detergent solution 2 siderably increasing the earning capacity ofthe car washer. In addition to the above advantages, the present car washer is faster in operation than prior washers, and at the same time, so gentle in its action that damage to car accessories is completely eliminated.

More speciiically, it is the principal objectv of the invention to provide a car washer having a novel scrubbing means capable of following and accommodating itself to every contour of the car as the latter moves past, so that no part of the car is missed or slighted; while at the same time, scrubbing the sides and top of the car vigorously yet gently, so that stubborn soil such as mud, oil, splattered insects, andthe like,v is quickly and completely removed without marring the finish.

In carrying out the present invention, a frame of any suitable construction is positioned along the path traveled by the car as the latter moves through the oar washer, and is mounted for reciprocating movement generally parallel to the direction of travel of the car. Fastened to this frame and projecting outwardly 'therefrom is a plurality of' closely spaced, relatively narrow scrubbing members that are resiliently urged toward the car so that their outer ends lie fiat against the car surface and tend to follow' the contours thereof. The car-contacting outer end portions of the scrubbing members are preferably formed of soft rubber or the like; and may be bristled or provided with other scouring means, so that the reciprocating movement of the members produces the desired scrubbing ac'- tion. Motor-driven means is providedA for reciprocating the frame with its attached scrubbing members as the car moves past, and an arrangement of nozzles sprays the car with a just before it' reaches the scrubbing members. Beyond' the scrubbing members is another system of spray nozzles'that spray the car with clear rinse water to` rinse away the detergent solution' and loosened soil, after which the surplus water may be driven off by air blasts or removed by suction means.

Another aspect of the invention has to do-With the application of Wax polish or glaze to the finish cfa caraiter the same has been Washed, and to this end means is provided for'sprayingf'a liquid waa'cnto the car surface, after'which the was is rubbed to a high polish by reciprocating scrubbers of the kind just described, except` that the members are preferably provided with'v soft bristles or lambs wool'covers.

A further object of the invention is to provide a scrubbing device of the class described, in which each of the several scrubbing members is independently hinged to the supporting frame, and is individually spring-pressed against the side of the car.

Another object is to provide a scrubbing device in which the soft rubber scrubbing members are removable from their respective supporting rods, so that replacement of the worn members can be effected quickly and inexpensively, without dismantling the entire machine.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a scrubbing mechanism for a car Washer which is so constructed and arranged as to be practically incapable of damaging projecting accessories on the cars.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon consideration of the following detailed description oi the preferred embodiment thereof, reference beingr had to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of one portion of a car washer, showing a top scrubber embodying the principles of the invention;

Figure 2 is a front elevational View of the same;

Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view, taken through the reciprocating scrubbing members;

Figure 4 is a side elevational view of another portion of the car washer, showing a side scrubber;

Figure 5 is a top plan view of the same;

Figure 6 is a front view of the mechanism shown in Figures 4 and 5;

Figure '7 is an enlarged sectional view taken at 1-1 in Figure 4, showing the attachment of the scrubbing members to the frame;

Figure 8 is an elevational view of the structure shown in Figure '7, as seen from the left-hand side thereof;

Figure 9 is an enlarged, partially cutaway plan view of the car-contacting outer end portions of the scrubbing member;

Figure 10 is a side elevational view of the same;

Figure 1l is an enlarged, fragmentary view of the tip end portion of one form of scrubbing member, showing rubber ngers molded integrally with the rubber backing;

Figure 12 is a similar view of another form of the scrubbing member. in which ber bristles are embedded in the backing of rubber or other soft material; and

Figure 13 is a side elevational view of a bent form of scrubbing member. which is used to get down into certain sharp-cornered recesses, such as is found at the junction of the leading edge of the rear fender with the car body.

The automatic car washer of the present invention comprises a series of operating units which are preferably arranged in a straight line along the path traveled by the automobiles to be washed, so that the cars are successively acted upon by the said units as they progress slowly along their course. inasmuch as the invention is primarily concerned with the scrubbing units for scrubbing the sides and ton surfaces of the cars, we have omitted any illustration of the dryer from the drawings and it will be understood that any conventional means may be employed to remove surplus water such as, for example, the commonly used high velocity air blast which is directed rearwardly against the outer surfaces of the cars through a series of nozzles.

While the scrubbing unit for the top surfaces and sides of the cars could just as well be combined into a single unit, we have elected, for the purpose of illustration, to show the scrubbers as two separate units; the top scrubber being illustrated in Figures l and 2, where it is designated in its entirety by the reference numeral 20, and the two side scrubbers being illustrated in Figures 4, 5 and 6, where they are designated by the reference numeral 2 I.

The cars are propelled through the Washer by any suitable means, the preferred form being a conveyer chain 22 running in a channel 23 in the oor. The cars are connected to the conveyer chain by means of short tow chains 24, each of which has a hook at the outer ends thereof that is hooked over the front bumper of the automobile. Alternatively, means could be provided on the conveyer chain for engaging the rear bumper of the automobile to push the same through the Washer. A low concrete curb 25 projects upwardly from the floor parallel to the conveyer chain 22 and engages the inside wall of the tires on one side of the car to guide the same through the washer. Fastened to the floor on the outside of the tire is an angle iron guide rail 26 which engages the outer wall of the tire t0 hold the front wheels in their course.

As the autodmobile enters the car washer, the first thing encountered in a needle spray of water issuing at high velocity from a series of rearwardly and downwardly directed nozzles 30 connected to two vertical water pipes 3| on opposite sides of the car. The purpose of this first water spray is to dislodge and rinse away any sand or other abrasive material that might scratch the finish when the car passes through the scrubbers 20 and 2|.

The top scrubber 20 comprises two laterally spaced, vertical guide posts 32 and 33 which are securely fastened to the floor on opposite sides of the car, and which are connected at their top ends by a transverse beam 34. The guide posts 32, 33 may have any desired cross-sectional shape, but are herein shown as cylindrical slidably mounted on the posts are sleeves 35 having laterally projecting bosses 36 on their inner sides, that receive the ends of a cross-shaft 40 which carries a supporting structure 4| and reciprocating frame 42 of the scrubber. The ends of the cross shaft 40 are preferably rigidly xed in the bosses 36, with the supporting structure pivoted on the shaft; although it will be understood that the shaft could just as well be journalled in the bosses and the supoprting structure iixedly mounted thereon.

The supporting structure 4| comprises two laterally spaced, fore and aft extending side members 43 and 44, which are connected together at their ends by cross members 45 and 4B. Sleeve journals 50, which are rotatably mounted on the cross shaft 40, are fixed in any suitable manner to the under sides of the members 43, 44 at the midpoints thereof, and the supporting structure 4| is thus pivoted for rocking movement about the shaft 40. Mounted on top of the cross members 45, 46 near the ends thereof are axially alined pairs of sleeve bushings 5| which receive two slide members 52. The members 52 are slidable within the bushings 5|, and their rear ends are connected by a transversely extending rod 53 of circular cross section. Welded to the underneath side of the slide members 52 at the front ends thereof is a transversely extending angle actas-1e.

L. member-'54, toA which theN scrubbing members. are attached;

The flanges 55 and Btlof the angleA` member 54.- are preferably, although not necessarily., set at any acute angle to. one another., forming` a. V-shapeol channel Iwhich opens forwardly and; downwardly. Welded to the inside surfaces of. the flanges 55, 5tV at intervals along the lengths of the member 5e are brackets` tilv which hold aA longitudinally extending pivot rod lil.. Attached to the rod (il at closely spaced intervals along the length thereof is a plurality of" scrubbing. members 52, each of. which is preferably conmy prised of a lone, slender arm G3 having a relatively soft, flexible bootor pad 64 of' rubbeilike material attached to the outer end thereof. The arm zinay be made either of' tubingor solid'rod, and its inner end is pivoted in any suitable mam. ner-on the rod Bl for vertical.swingingmovement. The arms are spaced apa-rt from one another and; are guided in their swinging movement by-curved spacers 55 which arev attached tothe edges of' anges 55, 55. Each of the arms t3 is resilient-1y pressed downf-.vardly ago-inst the car by means of an individual spring' E55' having a loop which. encircles the rod El.. One arm of the spring ttk is hooked over the edge of flange 55. on member 5Fl, while the other end ofthe spring is hooked over the arm 63'. Downward'movement ofthe arms E3 isl limited by the edge ofv the bottom flange 58;

Each of the boots 54 is detachably mounted on the outer endof its respective arm S3, and to this end is provided with a metal collar' le having asetscrew li that clamps tightly against the arm. The arm 63. is .inserted into a hole 12; formed in the backend of the boottll. The boot @el is similar to another boot E4 shown inliigures-Q and .lil and is preferably, although not necessarily, tapered in thickness toward its outer end, while increasing in width. rllieouter end of the boot 5l!" may be slit down the center, asshown at i3, dividing the boot end into two narrow strips 14 and l5, which are adapted to passen either side of any projection stick-ing out from the surface ofthe car.

The underneath sides ofA thev boots 54 and 5:4 are provided with scouring surfaces of any suitable type, which provide a gentle scrubbing or scouring eiect on. the surface of the car as the scrubbing members are reciprocated, so that road iilni and other stubborn soil will be Worked loose and removed Without injury to the finish. One suchscouring surface isshown at 'l5 in Figurev 11, and isseen to comprise a plurality of relatively short, slender lingers, 'il whichv are molded integrally with the rubber boot GA and project downwardly therefrom. The lingers 'll are spaced closely together and are quite resilient, so that they function in the manner ci bristles. Another type of scouring surface is shown at et in Figure 12, and comprises iiberbristles 81 of natural or synthetic bers, which are either stitched through the rubber boot 6 4', as shown, or are otherwise embedded therein.

Also mounted onthe arm t3 of cach of the scrubbing members $2; isf an auxiliary scrubbing member t3, the function` ofr which is to get at certain areas ofl the car that might be missed` by the scrubbing members di?. Each of. the auxiliary scrubbing members 83 is generally similar to the scrubbing member 52, and comprises arm 8d or" tubing or solid rod which is pivotally connected at 85. to a bracket et mounted on the arm 63 a short distance out from the spacers S5. A relatively-soft, resilient boot 8lI of the same composi' scouring means 98, such as shown in Figures 1'1 or 12; Each of the auxiliary scrubbing members.

83 hangs freely from its supporting bracket 86 and is Somewhat shorter than its associated scrubbing memberv 62 so that` as the scrubber passes over the backend ofv a car, the auxiliary scrubbing members 83 tendA tov drop back to theposition shown in thereby providing a dot-dash lines in Figure 3, downward scrubbing action fuf'ainstV av substantially'vertical portion of the car at the-extreme rear ends scrubbing members are thereof. The auxiliaryalso effective inl gettin-g at, the horizontal shield directly: behind thev front:

bumper. as well as places,

Mounted on the underneath side of iiange 5 6 of` member 54, are brackets ti that support a transversely extending pipe 92. pipe 9 2 projects beyond the end of member 54 and is connected by a coupling Sis to a flexiblehose 94. The hose 94 is supported on the right hand slide member 35 by means of a bracket 95, and extends downwardly therefrom to a valve 96, which supplies detergent solution under pressure. A, plurality of .nozzlesv Si are connected intoy the pipe 9 2v at intervals along the length thereof, and; these nozzles discharge a spray of the detergent solution on the surface of the car imrrlediatelyr ahead of the scrubbing members 52 and 83. The tcp surfaces of the car are thus thoroughly drenched withthe detergent solution before being reached by the scrubbing members, and the de tergent aids the scrubbing members loosening and` removing soil.` n

The frame vl2 withyits attached scrubbing members e2, 83 isreciprocated by suitable means, such as an electric motor Ill mounted on the underneath side of the supporting structure il adjacent the back edge thereof. The motor im is preferably provided with integral speed-reduction gears, which transmit the drive to a crank lill. A connecting rod its connects the crani; IS! to the crossbar 5 3 of the frame 42, and as the crank rotates, the-frame is` thus reciprocate-d. The speed and lengt-h of travel of the reciprocating rame can be varied over a wide range, although the bestY results are believed tok be obtained with a speed in the neighborhood of 26S-Oililstrokes per minute, and only a fraction of an inch of travel. This operating range produces a whipping, vibrating effect inthe scrubbing members that seems to hold the latter flat, against the surface of the car, withY a minimum of flailing and bending of the scrubbing members. While the electric motor and crank arrangement shown and described are believed to be the preferred Way of driving the reciprocating frame 42, it is also contemplated that other means might be used to drive the-frame, such as, for example, a hydraulicor pneumatic motor, or electro-magnetic means.

Themotor lili), being mounted on the supporting structure 4I to the rear ofthe pivot shaft 40, counterbalances a substantial portion of the weight of the angle member 54 and its attached scrubbing members, although the supporting structure should be overbalanced somewhat on the side of the scrubbing members, so that the latter tend to hang downwardly. This brings the scrubbing members down against the top surfaces on the engine hood and car body, and gives` the springs 66 something to push against. The amount` of overbalance in the supporting other relatively inaccessible One end of the;

structure 4| should not be so great, however, as to deflect the spring 66 until the arms 63 touch the edge of flange 55, as such a condition would bend the arm and possibly damage the scrubbing member or injure the finish of the car.

A substantial portion of the total weight of the supporting structure 4| and frame 42, as well as the shaft 40 and slide members 35, is counterbalanced by means of counterweights |05, which are suspended from the ends of cables |06. One of the cables |06 passes up over and around two pulleys |01 and |06 and then passes downwardly through a hole in member 34 to a point of attachment with an ear |09 projecting inwardly from the right hand sleeve member 35 (Figure 2). The other cable |06 passes over pulley |01 and then passes across the structure to the other side thereof, where it is trained around another pulley ||2 and down through a hole in member 34 to attachment with an ear ||3 projecting inwardly from the left hand slide member 35. The two pulleys |01, |08 are journalled on a bracket ||4 on the top end of post 33, while pulley ||2 is journalled cn a bracket H that is mounted on the cross member 34 adjacent the post 32, The weight of the counterweight |05 is preferably such that the entire supporting structure 4| and frame 42 can be lifted with relatively little effort, so that the same can be easily elevated by the car as the latter passes thereunder.

The supporting structure 4| and frame 42 are raised and lowered as the car passes thereunder, and are maintained at a predetermined. height above the top surface of the car by means cornprising a pair of laterally spaced wheels |20, only one of which can be seen in the drawings. Each of the wheels is journalled on the bottom end of a bracket structure |2| fixed to and extending downwardly from the underside of the supporting structure 4|, and the said wheels are provided with soft rubber tires |22, which are adapted to run on the top surfaces of the car without damaging the finish thereof.

Normally, the supporting structure 4| and frame 42 tend to swing down to a near-vertical position, with the scrubbing members 62 and 83 hanging downwardly and pointing somewhat rearwardly. As the car approaches the apparatus, the vertically reciprocating scrubbing inembers first engage the front bumper and radiator grille, reaching into the spaces between the grille bars, around fog lights and bumper guards, and probing down behind the bumper to scrub the gravel guard. Continuing its advance, the car is engaged on its front end by the two wheels r |20, which ride up onto the engine hood, lifting the supporting structure 4| and frame 42 with them as they climb, so that the scrubbing members are presented to the top of the engine hood.

Again, as the wheels |20 climb up the windshield l of the car, the supporting structure is lifted thereby and is held at the proper height and position to present the scrubbing members to the top surfaces of the car body. All of this time, the overbalance of the supporting structure 4| causes the scrubbing members 62 to be held downwardly against the car.

Upon leaving the top scrubber, the car passes between the two side scrubbers 2| which are shown in Figures 4, 5 and 6. As in the case of the top scrubber, each of the side scrubbers comprises a supporting structure |25, on which is mounted a reciprocating frame |26 carrying scrubbing members 62 and 62". The supporting structure may take any desired form, but is herein shown as comprising a rectangular, boxlike frame made up of angle irons welded together at their ends, as shown. A vertical channel member |30 is welded to the top and bottom frame members on the side adjacent the car, and mounted on the outer face of the channel member are three vertically spaced sleeve bushings |3 Also mounted on the vertical frame member at the inside corner on the left hand end of the structure are three more sleeve bushings |32, which are alined with their corresponding bushings |3|. Horizontally extending shafts |33 are slidably supported in the bushings |3I, |32, and the right hand ends of the shaft are welded to a vertically disposed angle iron |34.

Also welded to the three shafts |33 at longitudinally spaced points thereon are three vertically disposed angle irons 54 which support scrubbing members 62 and 62". The scrubbing members 62' and their manner of attachment to the angle iron 54 are substantially identical to the scrubbing members 62 of the top scrubber, and therefore need not be described again.

It will be noted in Figures rI and 8 that all of the arms 63 of the scrubbing members in each group are tied together by means of a rubber strip |40, which functions to hold the scrubbing members together when the tendency is for the members to spread apart; as when there is an abrupt change in direction of the surface over which the scrubbing members are traveling. Thus, when the scrubbing members are pulled over the top of the fender or any other part of the car tending to separate the members, the rubber strip acts to tie the scrubbing members together, and prevent their separation beyond a certain point.

Each of the reciprocating frames |26 is driven by an electric motor |4| which is mounted on a. platform |42 at the bottom of the supporting structure |25. A V-belt pulley |43 of small diameter is mounted on the shaft of motor |4|, and trained around this pulley is a V-belt |44, which is also trained around another pulley |45 of larger diameter. The pulley |45 is mounted on a shaft |46, which is journalled in bearings carried by bracket members |5|. Mounted on the end of shaft |46 adjacent the car is a crank |52 which is connected by a connecting rod |53 to a pin |54 on the angle iron member |34. Thus, motor |4| drives the shaft |46, and the crank |52 on the shaft reciprocates the frame |26.

It will be noted that the rubber boots 64" of the scrubbing members in the group at the right hand end of the frame |26 differ from the boots 64', in that there is a sharp, right angle bend at and another sharp right angle bend at |6I. The purpose of these bends is to provide a relatively sharp shoulder on the scrubbing members, which is adapted to get down into the corners formed at the junction of the leading edge of the rear fenders with the car body, as well as in other similar areas.

Before the car reaches the side scrubbers 2|. it encounters a spray of detergent solution issuing from nozzles |63 on two vertical pipes |64 located at either side of the car. The pipes |64 are connected to a source of detergent solution under pressure, and the nozzles |63 are spaced apart vertically so as to drench the sides of the car just before the scrubbing members are reached.

Immediately beyond the last of the three groups of scrubbing members, another spray of water is encountered; this one being of clear rinse water issuing from nozzles |65 on pipes |66.

Thsclear water spray rinses olf the detergent solution and loosened soil, and the car is now ready for drying.

One advantageous feature of our invention is that the same apparatus can be used to apply a wax polish to the car after the same has been washed and dried. In this case, the spray nozzles located just ahead of the scrubbing members would spray .a ne mist of wax polish onto the car, which would then be rubbed kto a high polish by scrubbing members covered with lambs wool or the like.

While we have lshown and described in kccnsiderable detail what we believe vto be the preferred form of our invention, we wish to make it clear that these details are merely illustrative, and do not restrict `the invention 'to thespecic 'forms disclosed. For example, 'the shape rof the scrubbing members, or the materials of` which they are made, or -the method of their attachment to the reciprocating frame might lbe widely varied from what We have shown without impairing the eiectiveness of the invention. Also, the number and placement of the scrubbing members might be considerably changed without departing from the broad scope of the invention, nor is vany particular significance to be attached to the specific shape of the supporting structure or of the reciprocating frame. 'These and other changes that will occur to those skilled in the art are encompassed within the broad claims appended hereto.

We claim:

l. In an automatic car washer having a path along which a car may be advanced, a top scrubber comprising a supporting structure disposed transversely across said path and mounted for vertical movement, means for raising and lowering said supporting structure as a car passes thereunder, whereby the structure is maintained at a predetermined height above the top surfaces of the car, a frame mounted on said supporting structure for reciprocating movement, a plurality of scrubbing members mounted on said frame and resiliently pressed against the top surfaces of the car, and means for reciprocating said frame.

2. In an automatic car washer having a path along which a car may be advanced, a top scrubber comprising a supporting structure disposed transversely across said path and mounted for vertical movement, counterbalancing means connected to said supporting structure and operable to carry a substantial portion of the weight thereof, means on said supporting structure engageable with and running over the top surfaces of the car as the latter moves forwardly, for raising and lowering the structure and maintaining the same ata predetermined height above the car, a frame mounted on said supporting structure for reciprocating movement, a plurality of scrubbing members mounted on said frame and resiliently pressed against the top surfaces of the car, and means for reciprocating said frame.

3. In an automatic car washer having a path along which a car may be advanced, a pair of vertical posts disposed on either side of said path, slide members movable up and down on said posts, a pivoted supporting structure disposed transversely across said path and carried by said slide members, means for raising and lowering said supporting structure as a car passes thereunder, whereby the structure is maintained at a predetermined height above the top surfaces of the car, a frame mounted on said supporting vStructure for reciprocating movement generally parallel vto the ldirection yof travel of the car, a plurality of scrubbing members mounted on lsaid frame and resilientl-y pressed against the top surfaces of the car, and means for reciprocating said frame.

4. In an automatic car washer having va vpath along which a ycar ymay -be advanced, `a pair of Vertical ypostsfdisposedion'either-side of said path, slide members movable up land down onsaid posts, a lpivoted supporting structure disposed transversely across said path andcarried kby'said slide members, counterbalancing means connected 'to said supporting vstructure and 4operable to carry a lsubstantial portion `of the weight thereof, means on said supporting structure `engageable with and running over the top surfaces of the car as vthe latter moves forwardly, for raising and ylowering `'the structure and maintaining the same at a .predetermined height above the car, a frame mounted onsaid ysupporting structure vfor reciprocating movement generally 'parallel to the direction `of travel of fthe car, -a 4plurality of scrubbing members attached to said frame along one rtransverse `edge thereof, ieachof .said scrubbing members having ka relatively '.soft,

lflexible portion at the outer `end thereof which is engageable with .the top surfaces :of the Acar -tc scour the same, spring means acting on .said

scrubbing members to urge the free ends thereof rdownwardly against the car, and means for reciprocating said frame.

5. In an automatic car washer having a path along which a-car Vmay-be advanced, a topscrubber comprising a supporting structure disposed transversely across said .path `and mounted for vertical movement, means for raising and lowering said supporting structure as a car passes thereunder, whereby the structure is maintained at a predetermined height above the top surfaces of the car, a frame mounted on said supporting structure for reciprocating movement, a plurality of scrubbing members pivoted at one end on said frame for vertical swinging movement, spring means urging the free ends of said scrubbing members downwardly against the top surfaces of the car, each of said scrubbing members having an auxiliary scrubbing member pivotally attached thereto at a distance outwardly from its point of attachment, said auxiliary scrubbing member being free to hang downwardly from its point of attachment with said first-named scrubloing means, and means on said supporting structure for reciprocating said frame.

6, In an automatic car washer having a fixed path of travel along which a car may be advanced, a plurality of closely spaced scrubbing members arranged side by side opposite a surface of' a car advancing along said path of travel, each of said scrubbing members comprising an arm having arelatively soft, flexible scrubbing pad attached at a free end thereof, mounting means supporting said arms from their rearward ends side by side in close spaced substantially parallel planes which longitudinally intersect a car on said path and which are longitudinally disposed with respect to said path, said mounting means including pivot means mounting the arms for independent pivotal action in said parallel longitudinal planes, spring means yieldingly urging said arms inward toward the surface of a car on said path, whereby said pads are engaged by said surface, and means for reciprocating the rearward ends of said arms along direction lines substantially longitudinal of said path of travel.

7. The subject matter of claim 6, wherein the mounting means for the arms support the arms so as to point generally in the direction of travel of a car on said path of travel.

8. The subject matter of claim 6, wherein the mounting means for the arms includes means supporting the arms for a range of variable and independent swinging action between an inactive position making a large angle with the direction of travel of a car on said path, and a plurality oi operative positions, with the pads of the arms in engagement with the surfaces of a car on said path, in which operative positions said arms make lesser angles with said direction of travel.

9. In an automatic car washer having a path of travel along which a car may be advanced, a supporting frame disposed adjacent said path of travel, means mounting said frame for reciprocation with a component of movement parallel to said path of travel, means for so reciprocating said frame, a plurality of closely spaced scrubbing members mounted side by side on said frame, each of said scrubbing members comprising an arm having a relatively soft, flexible scrubbing pad attached at a free end thereof, mounting means supporting said arms from their rearward ends on said frame side by side in close spaced substantially parallel planes which longitudinally intersect a car on said path and which are longitudinally disposed with respect to said path, said mounting means including pivot means mounting the arms for independent pivotal action in said parallel longitudinal planes, and spring means yieldingly independently urging said arms toward the surface of a car on said path, and means for reciprocating said frame and scrubbing members mounted thereon, whereby said scrubbing pads are individually yieldingly pressed into engagement with said surface and are rubbed back and forth along said surface in a direction generally longitudinal of the car by virtue of the reciprocation oi said frame.

10. The subject matter of claim 9, wherein the mounting means for the arms support the arms so as to point generally in the direction of travel of a car on said path of travel.

11. The subject matter of claim 9, wherein the mounting means for the arms includes means supporting the arms for a range of variable and independent swinging action between an inactive position making a large angle with the direction of travel of a car on said path, and a plurality of operative positions. with the pads of the arms in engagement with the surfaces of a car on said path, in which operative positions said arms make lesser angles with said direction of travel.

DAVID ROBERT SHUSE'I'I. MISCHA N. BEREZNY.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 686,764 Richards Nov. 19, 1902 1,458,179 Hamer June 12, 1923 1,599,194 Williams Sept. 7, 1926 1,708,052 Burlew Apr. 9, 1929 1,734,429 Hanover Nov. 5, 1929 1,968,986 Blackhall et al Aug. 7, '1934 2,242,692 Yingling May 20, 1941

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2800671 *Apr 8, 1954Jul 30, 1957Nowak JeromeAutomobile washing apparatus
US2948907 *Mar 31, 1958Aug 16, 1960Edward SchmidtApparatus for washing and cleaning automobiles and other surfaces and the like
US3175537 *May 13, 1963Mar 30, 1965Milton A PaulApparatus for grooming and applying insecticide to an animal
US3337896 *Jan 21, 1966Aug 29, 1967Russell B AllenCar wash system
US3432346 *Apr 24, 1963Mar 11, 1969Johnson & Son Inc S CAutomobile washing method
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US4349972 *Apr 27, 1981Sep 21, 1982Bruce's Splicing & Rigging Co., Inc.Shellfish dredge chafing gear
US4643209 *May 1, 1986Feb 17, 1987Ronald D. FastVehicle washing machine
US5076304 *Aug 28, 1990Dec 31, 1991Mark Vii Equipment, Inc.Rotary-tiltable car wash system
US5134742 *May 8, 1991Aug 4, 1992N/S CorporationVehicle washing apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/53.1, 15/186, 15/DIG.300, 15/188, 15/DIG.200
International ClassificationB60S3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60S3/04, Y10S15/02, Y10S15/03
European ClassificationB60S3/04