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Publication numberUS2658760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1953
Filing dateMar 14, 1950
Priority dateMar 14, 1950
Publication numberUS 2658760 A, US 2658760A, US-A-2658760, US2658760 A, US2658760A
InventorsAndrew J Brost
Original AssigneeAndrew J Brost
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Horse racing game apparatus
US 2658760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. J. BRosT HORSE RACING GAME APPARATUS Nov. l0, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed March 14, 1950 Nov. l0, 1953 A BROS-r 2,658,760

HORSE RACING GAME APPARATUS Filed March 14, `1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Y ma, LlZZa'u LQAU Patented Nov. 10, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HORSE RACING GAME APPARATUS Andrew J. Brost, Chicago, Ill.

Application March 14, 1950, Serial No. 149,486

3 Claims. l

This invention relates, in general, to a game, and is particularly concerned with a racing game.

While the particular embodiment of the invention which I shall describe hereinafter in connection with the drawings is a race horse game and has especial advantages in simulating handicapping and other possibilities in a race horse game, it is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to a race horse game but may be embodied in games using objects other than horse simulating pieces.

Prior attempts have been made to provide race horse games in which the horse simulating or other playing pieces are advanced along tracks by the throw of dice or operation of other chance means. Such prior attempts have not, however, provided means for simulating various possibilities in the actual running of a horse race, and they have not provided the amusement, excitement, and instruction as far as racing terms and possibilities are concerned which are provided by the present invention.

One of the main objects of the invention is to provide an improved racing game having means for simulating various possibilities not previously contemplated in games of this sort and which will be amusing, exciting, and instructive as far as racing terms are concerned.

Another object of the invention is to provide a racing game having a plurality of tracks each divided into a plurality of advancing stations with playing pieces movable along the tracks by advancement to such stations, there being more advancing stations in at least one track than in other tracks so that the playing piece moving along the track with the greater number of advancing stations requires more moves and is thereby handicapped to that extent, and chance means operable to determine which playing piece is to be moved and the amount of advance whereby the playing piece requiring the greater number of moves may move the length of the track ahead of the other playing pieces.

Another object of the invention is to provide means for changing the number of advancing stations along the diierent tracks.

Another object of the invention is to provide a game of the class described in which the means for providing diierent numbers of advancing stations along the different tracksis also operable to change the number of advancing stations along the diierent tracks whereby to handicap the playing pieces movable along one or more tracks more than the playing pieces movable 2 along one or more other tracks and to change the handicapping along different tracks.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved form of chance means for determining which of the playing pieces is to be moved along its track, and the distance it is to be advanced.

Another-object of the invention is to provide a game having various features of novelty and advantages, and which is characterized by its simplicity in construction, its economy in manufacture, and its adaptability for use in producing the new results which will hereinafter appear.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which show the construction and operation of an illustrative embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figurel is a top plan view of a game board embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary edge view of the board shown in Figure 1, and showing one of the insert boards for providing different numbers of advancing stations along the different tracks and for changing the number of advancing stations along the different tracks;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of another insert board which is illustrative of one or more such other insert boards interchangeable with the insert board shown in Figures 1 and 2;

Figures 4A, 5A and 6A are perspective views showing one particular set of dice for determining which of the playing pieces is to be moved along its track and the distance it is to be moved;

Figures 4B, 5B and 6B are perspective views showing the dice of Figures 4A, 5A and 6A in different positions; and

Figure 7 is a side elevational view showing one particular form of playing piece for use with the present invention.

With reference now to the drawings, the particular embodiment of the invention selected for purposes of illustration comprises a game board I upon which is delineated a race course `2 having parallel sides 3 and rounded ends 4..

The particular race course 2 shown in the drawings has eight tracks which are equally spaced throughout the extent of the race course and are defined by a plurality of series of transversely aligned and relatively widely spaced advancing stations 5, 6, 1, 8, 9, Ill, II and I2. The particular contour of the race course, as well as the particular number of tracks thereon. and the particular number and spacing of the advancing stations 5, 3, 1, 8, 9, I0, II and I2, may vary widely Within the scope of the present invention.

Ahead of the rst advancing station 5 is a series of transversely aligned starting stations I3 which have differently colored delineations I4, for example, of generally rectangular or other conguration and diiferent numbers I5 corresponding to the colors and numbers on the different playing pieces as will presently appear. The particular markings or other means for identifying the different tracks with the different playing pieces may also, of course, vary widely within the scope of the present invention.

The starting stations I3 are the stations at which the correspondingly identified playing pieces are placed in starting the game. The stations 5 are the stations to which the playing pieces are advanced when they are entitled to one move or one increment of advance from the starting stations I3. The stations 6, 1, 8, 9, I0, Il. and I2 are the stations to which the playing pieces are advanced when entitled to two, three, four, five, six, seven or eight moves or increments of Yadvance for the particular race course shown in the drawings.

Beyond the stations I2 in the path of travel of the playing pieces the board I has a cut-out portion I6 which extends transversely across the track and is adapted selectively to receive one of a plurality of interchangeable insert boards, one of which is shown in place at l1 in Figures 1 and 2. Another insert board shown at I8 in Figure 3 isinterchangeable with the insert board I'I. These two insert boards II and I8 are illustrative of two or more such boards or inserts, it being understood that any desired number of insert boards may be employed as suitable or desired.

The insert board I'I has, for example, a plurality of differently colored stripes I9, 20, 2 I, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26, one for registration with each of the` respective tracks when the insert board is in place. The advancing stations I2 may have diiTerently colored delineations 21 of generally rectangular or other configuration corresponding to the colors of the stripes I9-26 and to the colors of the starting stations I3. The portion of the track along the insert Il has designated by stripe I3 is divided, for example, into ve relatively closely spaced advancing stations 28, whereas the track portion of the insert I1 as designated by stripe is divided, for example, into seven closely spaced advancing stations 29. The stripes 2I and 22 have no advancing stations Y therealong, whereas stripe 23 has four closely spaced advancing stations 30, while stripe 24 has two -closely spaced advancing stations 3l and stripe 25'has six closely spaced advancing stations 32. Stripe 26 has one advancing station 33.

It is to be understood that the number of track portions along the inserts will vary according to the number of track portions on .the board I, and that the number of Yadvancing stations along the dili'erent track portions on the inserts and the number of insert track portions which lack advancing stations may all vary within the scope of the broader aspects of the present invention. Thev essential feature is that with an insert board in place, different tracks along the race course are divided Vthereby into different numbers of advancing stations. Each advancing station, whether along the track or along the insert board, constitutes one move or increment of advance for the playing lpiece which is moved along that track. The insert board II, therefore, may constitute handicapping means for handicapping the different playing pieces differently to simulate, for example, handicapping of `different horses of different abilities differently as in an actual horse race.

The handicapping of the respective playing pieces may be changed by replacing the insert I'I, for example, with another insert board I8 having different numbers of advancing stations along its diiferent track portions. For example, on insert board I8 the track portions or stripes I9 and 20 each has three advancing stations; the track portion 2 I has two advancing stations; the track portions 22' and 23 each has one advancing station; the track portion 24 has six advancing stations; the track portion 25 has no advancing stations; and the track portion 2B has seven advancing stations.

Beyond the handicapping insert boardV each track is shown as having, for example, six additional relatively closely spaced -advancing {stations 34 which are preferably transversely aligned as shown in Figure 1. The transversely arranged series of the stations 34 nearest to the starting stations are the last stations and'constitute the nish of one race. Then vby substituting different handicap insert boards the playing pieces may be diierently handicapped for one or more further races, as desired.

The particular form Vof the playing pieces and the particular manner of supporting them at starting position and at the various advancing stations may vary within the scope of the present invention. Where the game is a race horse game, as is the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, the playing pieces may be shaped to simulate horses as shown at 35 in Figure 7. The horses 35 may be mounted by representations of jockeys 3B. The different horses 35 may have differently colored delineations 37, for example, in the shape of blankets or other conguration, and numbers 38 corresponding to the colors and numbers at the starting stations I3.

Each starting and advancing station is shown as comprising an aperture formed, for example, by eyelets 39 suitably secured in the board l, and inserts I'I and vI8 as shown in Figure 2. If desired, the eyelets 39 in the inserts may project downwardly from the bottom surfaces of the inserts to engage in apertures in the bottom of the cut-out portion I6 of the board I to hold the inserts in place during the -playing of the game, although this may, of course, vary. Each horse or Iplaying piece 35 has a depending pin 40 attached thereto. The pins 40 are adapted to enter the apertures formed by the eyelets 39 at the respective starting and advancing stations whereby to hold the horses 35 or other playing pieces in upright positions at their respective stations.

The present invention includes chance means which is operable to determine which of the playing pieces 35 is to be advanced along its track and the number of advancing stations it is to be moved. While other chance means may be employed within the scope of the broader aspects of the invention, the chance means selected for illustration comprises a series of dice having faces differently identified to correspond to different identii'lcations on the different playing pieces, and other faces have designations indicating different amounts of movement to Ibe imparted to the diierent playing pieces.

The set of dice comprises two or more dice, the particular set of dice shown in the drawings comprising three dice 42, `43, and 44. The die 42, as shown in Figures 4A and 4B, has a one spot 45 on one face, a symbol 46 (such as a star or asterisk) on its opposite face, and one, two, three, and four markings 4I, 48, 49, and 50 on its other four faces. The one, two,\ three, and four markings correspond to the one, two, three, and four markings on the rst four horses or playing pieces 35. The die 43 has a one spot 5I on one facea symbol 52, correspending` to symbol 46 on one face of die 42, on its opposite face, and five six, seven, and eight markings 53, 54, 55, and 56 on its other four faces. The ve, siX, seven, and eight markings correspond to the ve, six, seven, and eight markings on the other four horses or playing pieces 35. It is to be understood that the number of dice employed may vary, particularly where the number of tracks is less or greater than shown in the drawings. The third die 44 has a one spot 5'! on one face, a one spot 53 on its opposite face, and two, three, four, and live spots 59, 5I), 6I, and 62 on its other four faces. The arrangement of spots on the die 44 is to prevent any one playing piece or contestant from advancing too fast, but this may vary.

'The faces of dice 42 and 43, which bear numbers corresponding to numbers $8 on the playing pieces 35 and the numbers l5 at the starting stations I3, may be colored as shown in the drawings to correspond to the different colors on the different playing pieces 35 and the diiTerent colors I4 at the different starting stations. This, of course, may be varied within the scope of the present invention.

In order that the playing board I may be folded readily when not in use, it may be made up in two sections 65 and 66 having hinged connection at El. The sections 55 and 66 are divided by a transverse cut 58 so that with the hinged connection at 61 one section of the board may be folded over on the other section and into parallel relation therewith when the board is not in use.

The board l may be formed of cardboard, either of single ply or laminated construction, or it may be formed oi fiber board, Wood, metal, heavy paper-like material, or any other suitable or preferred material.

It is contemplated within the scope of the present invention to make the board sections 65 y and 65, or one of these sections, of box-like form so that when folded the playing pieces, dice, score sheets, instructions and/or other material for use in playing the game may be contained within the box-like structure.

In playing the game the playing pieces 35 are lined up at the starting positions I3. Chips may be used in playing the game, and in such case they may be equally divided among al1 of the players. Chips so divided may serve as each players stake for betting, if desired. All players may then participate in bidding and the highest bidder may be designated as the track operator. The track operator may then post the chips to the amount of the bid, thus forming a pool or bank against which all other players may place bets if desired.

The contestants may take turns in throwing the dice, and the playing pieces are advanced according to the roll of the dice. The race is declared 6 ended as soon as one or more of the playing pieces 35 reaches the finish line, and the position of the playing pieces 35 at that point will determine the order of finish.

If, for example, upon throw of the dice they take the positions shown in Figures 4A, 5A and 6A, the number one and ve playing pieces Will be advanced one advancing station. If the dice take the positions shown in Figures 4B, 5B and 6B, the number three and seven playing pieces will be advanced four advancing stations. A single symbol 46 or 52 may have no significance, but two symbols may advance all horses one or more advancing stations as may be decided in playing the game.

In a special feature race only two dice may be used, and a single symbol may advance all playing pieces.

A totalizer board may list horses in order of post position showing handicap and odds as Well as rate of payment on separate bets.

In playing the game, each race is a handicap race, the handicap being that number of spaces a horse must advance to the nish line. The handicap is regulated by the handicap insert boards, i. e. by interchanging these boards to change the number of spaces diierent horses must advance along different tracks. The handicaps may be indicated on the totalizer board by iigures under WT.

If desired, each player may place as many bets and as many types of bets on as many horses as he desires. Tickets may be used in placing bets, similar to pari-mutuel tickets sold at a race track, except that each ticket may accommodate more than a single bet. The tickets may be available in the desired denominations. Each ticket may, if desired, accommodate from one to three bets, each on win, place, show, sweepstakes, or daily double. Bets may be placed on any number of horses on a single ticket, and each bet may be charged for separately according to the denomination of the ticket and the full purchase amount may be totaled in a space provided therefor.

It is obvious from the foregoing that while certain horses must travel a greater number of spaces than other horses, they may, notwithstanding such handicaps, win the race, depending upon the throw of the dice or operation of other chance means. rhe game, therefore, affords amusement and excitement in pla-ying the same, and is instructive as far as racing terms are concerned.

The embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings is for illustrative purposes only, and it is to be expressly understood that the drawings and the accompanying specification are not to be construed as a deilnition of the limits or scope of the invention, reference being had t0 the appended claims for that purpose.

I claim:

l. In a game oi the class described, in combination, a game board having a plurality of tracks thereon, each track having a starting position and being divided into an equal number 0f predetermined and permanentl advancing Stations spaced. lengthwise of the track, said game board having a recessed cut-out portion extending transversely across all the tracks and positioned intermediate the last of the predetermined and permanent advancing stations and said starting positions, and an insertable element for insertion into said recess, said insertable element defining handicapping means and having track portions for register with the tracks onsaid board, the track portions of said insert.- able element being divided into different numbers of advancing stations 'to vary the number of stations along the tracks.

2; A game as dened in claim 1 wherein each track is marked diierently and wherein the ins'ertable element for changing the number of stations along the trackshas track portions for register` with the respective tracks on the board and'wherein said-track portions are divided into diierentV numbers of advancing stations, said track portions receiving playing pieces each marked to correspond Withthe marking of its track.

3. A game as defined in claim 1, wherein the insertable element may be replaced by a, similar insert having track portions for register with 8i the respective` tracks on said boardbut. divided into a still different numberV of advancing stations.

ANDREW J. BROST.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date- 1',268,659 Wright June 4', 1918` 1,628,073 Sousa May 10, 1927 11,741,832 Farrell Dec. 31, 1929 1,769,726 Walker July 1, 1930 2,044,122 Michener June 16, 1936` 2,070,608 Michelil Feb. 16, 1937 2,223,175 Ink Nov. 26, 1940 2,230,332 Moore Feb. 4, 1941 Wetzell Nov. 9, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1268659 *Sep 25, 1916Jun 4, 1918John Lloyd WrightGame and game apparatus.
US1628073 *Apr 21, 1926May 10, 1927John B SousaGame
US1741832 *May 1, 1929Dec 31, 1929Sidney T FarrellGame
US1769726 *May 31, 1929Jul 1, 1930Gordon C AreyGame
US2044122 *Sep 11, 1934Jun 16, 1936Charles P MichenerGame
US2070608 *Nov 29, 1935Feb 16, 1937Robert MitchellGame
US2223175 *Aug 23, 1938Nov 26, 1940Joseph W InkGame
US2230332 *Jul 18, 1939Feb 4, 1941William A MooreGame apparatus
US2453290 *Apr 19, 1944Nov 9, 1948Roland M WetzelRacing game and puzzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3099451 *Mar 1, 1960Jul 30, 1963Elmer M NewhouseSolar space games
US3416802 *Mar 17, 1967Dec 17, 1968Jose M. Garcia MontesSimulated horse race board game apparatus
US3463496 *Mar 11, 1966Aug 26, 1969Albert A WeinsteinRacing game apparatus including color matched dice and tokens
US3649022 *Nov 7, 1969Mar 14, 1972Clark Ralph N JrBoard game apparatus
US4119321 *Jun 6, 1977Oct 10, 1978Creel Jack RGame with board and pieces and dice
US4515369 *Nov 22, 1982May 7, 1985Johnson Ernest LDice and blackjack game board
US5050888 *Oct 5, 1990Sep 24, 1991Schultz Ronald DBoard game method
US20090045573 *Aug 14, 2007Feb 19, 2009Dean KerkhoffHorse racing game
US20120282988 *Jul 17, 2012Nov 8, 2012Martens Philip SCribbage card game and pegging board
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246, 273/146, 273/282.1, 273/284, 273/285
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00233, A63F3/00082, A63F3/00006, A63F2003/0034
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10