Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2660040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1953
Filing dateFeb 9, 1951
Priority dateFeb 9, 1951
Publication numberUS 2660040 A, US 2660040A, US-A-2660040, US2660040 A, US2660040A
InventorsBabski Martin F
Original AssigneeBabski Martin F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Saucer grid
US 2660040 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1953 M F, BAVBSK. 2,660,040

SAUCER GRID M. F. BABSKI SAUCER GRID Nov. 24, 1953 2, Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 9, 1951 INVENTOR. MARTIN F. BAasKl adn/MMM AT T O QN EYS Patented Nov. 24, 1953 UNTED `s'm'ris :PATENT lcirlrifxc 4` Claims;

This-invention relates to saucer grisandmgre a't'ieiilarlf to a grid detachably nigunted ina saucer to supporta drinking cup `out of contact "with liquid in the-saucer, It is` among the objects of the inventien to pro vide an openwrk `grid 6r vgiille-which can be placed in a saucer to'su'rpdrta drinking cup out f Crtaet with the saucer and abo'v'eanyiiquid which may have ,seein aeciaenauy @media tue saucerij which will t into 'a cnventinaisauceij and rny be detachably secured the'einhvv'hich p "r'i/ides f'or thefrefiw f spilled liquidffrorn the oute'r prtio'nsef the saucer te t11e `f ente ijrti-ori theref; which I'ia'y be nrbvide'dinifariiis'designs of ribs and rings; and vi/hieh'is sirnplev ainddurable'in enstructin, ee'onrnial te manufaeture'aiid neat and attractive in appearance. c

Other bjeets arid advantag'swill bfe'r'z'rr'e apparent frin'a cnsideration of the follufingfdel sfcriptionv and appended claims in c 'enjun'c'tion with the accbmbanying' drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan' Vie'w of'aJ` saucefwith a` afeer grid illustrativf'eef theinveiition perative rr'ioi'ntd therein; l

`Figure `2 is a crosssectional view 'n th"e` 1 i` f 2:2 of Figure 1, with a drinkmgcup shown'in breken lines supported onfthe saucer grid`; Figure 3 is va10ers peetijre View oa springclip used lt releasably secure" thegrid in the Figure iisl a top p'le'm-Vieify s irniiartofFig sliwinng' a somewhat' modid'iorrn" f saucer grid: n n c c Figure 5r is*y ai cross-sectional View .similarto Figure 2 taken Ouche une 51:5 of Figure 4i" A Figure 6'fis a fragmentary crQss'=sectior ia1 fVieW ef the saucer V and grid illustrated in Figure 4 taken on the line 6 '6 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 kis av ytop plan View simi'lartfFig" es 4:0 heig` 1`it ,'asfi s clearly illustratedA in Figure 2;-but

crgssseetionalmaimensionsicomprising a" hfeiht c 'f Withl 4'5" at te base of; onei c c anbtlier' modied Vform of saucer grid; and e' ghth of an meh and a with Figli-f' 1 0 is ya"Crss'#Sectio'nariA VieWbh the l'n lflofFigureS. With cntinued rference tthe drawings, the saucer 'generally indicated at Il), isthe 'saine 'in' al1 the forms' of the invention and is of known conventional construction'being"'concave Onits" twee upper-side and convexonitsloweror bettom'side,' .t-

and atlectiye appearance, for4 rhegrid.;

that @surf @Mering air'ular Supporting ribofbee if!! fr@ j ver pbaio'fl 'tothe Cenferpomon-of coucenuric'a-uy disposed onus bottomgconvex side '55d tesaucer;

tjrieystraighb ribsfnave wheightimateriauy greater' than their maximum width. Straightribs'havrg' 4 of pp xirnately onefquarter or anZ inch, a width at the tgp vQiferie-sixteentri' of an inch 'have been" f Qu d tq prcyid e a,dequate strength and "a"n`eat" ef time saucer-andthe bot- .tor the passage' ref uuuidn Lu'gs I9 are provided on the circular rib or ring I5 at substantially equal spaced intervals therearound, three lugs being shown in the drawings and each being in the form or an inwardly directed hook, and clips, as indicated at 20 and particularly illustrated in Figure 3, are engaged one with each of the lugs i9 and over the rim of the saucer at locations adjacent the corresponding lugs. l

Each of the clips 2|) is a spring clip comprising a length of resilient wire bent rst to a U or hairpin shape to provide spaced apart and substantially parallel legs 2| and 22 connected at corresponding ends by a curved bight portion `23, and these legs are recurved intermediate their length through arcs of approximately 180, as indicated at 24 and 25, for the legs 2| and 22, respectively, to provide auxiliary legs 26 and 2l spaced from and substantially parallel to the portions of the legs connected to the bight 23. The ends of the auxiliary legs 26 and 2T are curved outwardly away from the bight connected leg portions to facilitate placing the clips on a saucer.

In using the clips, the bight portions of the clips are hooked over corresponding lugs |9, and the auxiliary leg portions 26 and 21 of each clip are then forced under the rim of the saucer at a location adjacent the corresponding lug, so that each clip receives the rim portion of the saucer between its bight connected leg portions and auxiliary legs, as clearly illustrated in Figure 2, and with its bight portion hooked around the corresponding lug |9. These clips are loose or slack, so that they are easy to apply and do not hold the grid away from the bottom of the saucer.

This arrangement secures the grid in the saucer, so that the grid will not slip in the saucer during use, but permits the grid to drop to the bottom of the saucer and to be removed from the saucer for washing of the saucer and grid or for use of the saucer without the grid if such use is desired. The grid may be formed of a resiliently flexible material, such as vulcanized natural or synthetic rubber which will facilitate the connection of the spring clips between the lugs of the grid and the rim of the saucer, or may be formed of other material, such as synthetic resin plastics, metal or glass.

As shown in Figure 2, a cup 28 will be supported on the top surface of the grid, that is, on the upper edges of the straight ribs I6 and spaced from the upper surface of the saucer and above any liquid which may be spilled in the saucer. This keeps the bottom of the cup dry, so that, in drinking from the cup, no liquid will drip from the cup onto the table linen or the clothing of the person using the cup. This factor is of particular importance in such establishments as restaurants and cafeteras, where it is almost impossible to carry a cup of beverage, such as coffee, to a table without spilling some of the coffee from the cup into the saucer.

In the form of the invention illustrated in Figures 4, 5 and 6, the saucer Ill is the same as that illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 and described above, and the clips 20 are the same as those described in connection with Figure 3. The grid illustrated in Figures 4, 5 and 6 is somewhat different, however, from that shown in Figures 1 and 2, and comprises a circular outer rib or ring 30 and a plurality of straight ribs 3| extending across the space encompassed by the circular` rib 30 substantially parallel to each other and spaced at substantially equal intervals along a diameter of the circular rib 30 perpendicular to the straight ribs 3|. Two arcuate ribs 32 and 33 extend transversely of the straight ribs at the respectively opposite sides of the above-mentioned diameter of the circular rib 30 perpendicular to the straight ribs, and these arcuate ribs have their ends coinciding at the mid-length locations Iof the outer straight ribs 34 and 35 to provide within the grid a somewhat elliptical or lemonshaped gure symmetrical with the diameter of the circular outer rib 3|] of the grid disposed perpendicular to the straight ribs 3|.

In this modied arrangement, the circular rib 3l) has substantially the same shape and size as the rib I5 of the form illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 and described above. The straight ribs 3|, however, have straight upper and lower edges and a width materially less than the maximum depth of the space within the saucer in which the grid is disposed, so that the straight bottom edges of the straight ribs 3| are spaced well above the upper surface of the saucer, as is particularly illustrated in Figures 5 and 6.

The arcuate ribs 32 and 33, however, have a width at their mid-length locations substantially equal to the full depth of the portion of the saucer in which the grid is mounted, and taper in width at their upper ends to t the upwardly curved annular rim portion of the saucer. These arcuate ribs are provided in their lower edges with notches |32 which provide passages for the flow of liquid from the outer portion to the center portion of the saucer. The upper edges of the straight ribs 3| and arcuate ribs 32 and 33 lie in a ilat surface or plane to support the drinking cup 28 spaced from the upper surface of the saucer and above any liquid which may be spilled into the saucer.

The circular outer rib 30 of the grid is provided with lugs i9 spaced at substantially equal angular intervals therearound to receive clips 28 by meansfof which the grid is releasably secured in a saucer in the manner described above.

In the form of the invention illustrated in Figures '7 and 8, the saucer, lugs and clips are the same as those described above, and the grid comprises an outer circular ring or rib 3B and concentric circular intermediate and inner rings 3l, 38 and 39 circumferentially spaced at substantially equal distances from each other. This grid also comprises four straight ribs 40, 4|, l2 and t3 extending from the outer ring to the inner ring diametrically of the rings and spaced apart at angular intervals of approximately in the order named. Each quarter of the grid also includes four chordwise extending, straight ribs fill, d5, 45 and 41 parallel to each other1 and to the corresponding diametrically extending ribs and spaced apart substantially equal distances. The ribs 4t and 45 are disposed substantially at right angles to each other and extend from the outer circular rib 36 to the intermediate circular rib 38 nearest the inner circular rib or ring 39, and the straight ribs d6 and il are also disposed at right angles to each other and extend from the outer ring 3E to the intermediate ring 37 nearest the outer ring. The diametrically or radially extending straight ribs 40, 4|, |32 and 43 have a width substantially equal to the depth of the portion of the saucer in which the grid is disposed, but the inner circular ribs 37, 33 and 33 have a width materially less than the width of the ribs 40 to 43, inclusive, and have their lower edges spaced above the lower edges of these lastmentioned ribs. Notchesv |46 are provided in the fas-situa) bottom edges of the ribs 46 and l1-at theirintersection' with eachother and the cirularrib 31 to provide passages for the'flow of 'spilled liquid to the center portionfof the saucer. The'upper edges of all of the ribs exceptV the outer'rib or ring 3ft lie in a common fiat surface or plane to,firmly support the., cup 26 and no ribs extend across the interior of the inner ring 39. The outer ring orlrib et is of ,approximatelythe same size and shapeyas the outer ring, la described in connection 'with Figures l1 and?, and projects above the top plane of the straight and intermediate circular ribs ofthe grid.

vThis gridis releasably secured in thesaucer by the lugs l-S and spring clipsZlj in the` manner described above.

' In the additional modified form of the invention illustrated in Figures Qand'lO, the saucer, lugs and spring clips are the same as those `described above, and the grid-comprises an'outer, circular rib or ring 5ta similar insize and-shape to the outer ring I5 of Figures 1 and?, as described above. This modied-gridalso comprises aninner'circular rib or ring 5l concentric with the outer circular rib 5l! and an intermediate circular rib 52 concentric with the circular ribs 59 and 51 and circumferentially disposed substantially midway between'the outer `and inner rings. A plurality ofstraight ribs. 53. extend radially in spoke-like 4fashion from vthe outer ring ltor the inner ring across the intermediate ring' and are spaced apart` atv substantially equal angular intervals around the concentric rings. While the number of .straightribs 53 may be varied without in any way exceeding the scope of the invention, it has been found thatl. radially directedribs spaced apart at angular intervals of 221/2 provide a grid which is entirely satisfactory in use.

In this arrangement the radially disposed straight ribs have a Width substantially equal to the depth of the space Within the saucer in which the .grid is disposed, but the circular ribs 5l and 52 have a width materially less than the Width of the straight ribs, so that the bottom edges of the circular ribs are spaced from the bottom edges of the straight ribsl toward the top edges of the ribs, as is clearly illustrated in Figure 10. All of the ribs except the outer circular rib 50 have their top edges in a common flat surface or plane, and the straight ribs terminate at the inner ring 5E) and do not extend across this inner ring.

In both forms of the invention as illustrated in Figures 7 and 8 and 9 and 10, the spacing of the lower edges of the circular ribs from the bottom surface of the grid provides passageways for the free flow of liquid spilled into the saucer from the outer annular portion of the saucer to the center portion thereof, where the liquid can be collected in depression l i.

The above-suggested materials of which the grids may be formed are readily moldable materials, and it is contemplated that each grid will be molded or cast as a one-piece or integral structure in which the ribs are integrally joined together at the locations at which they intersect. All of the grids are provided with generally convex bottom surfaces fitting the concave upper surface of a conventional saucer and with flat, cup supporting upper surfaces and may be provided in various colors as may be desired, or otherwise ornamented to enhance their appearance. The grids may be provided either with or without the clips 20 and lugs i9, as may be desired.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodimentsare, therefore, to be considered in all-respects as illustrative and not restrictiva the scope ofthe invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come Within the meaning and. range of equivalency of the claims are, therefore, intended to be embraced therein.l c

What is claimed is: Y

1. `Incombination with a saucer having a substantially circular rim and an inner concave surface of spheroidal shape within said rim, a cup supporting grid removably mounted in `said saucer and comprising an open Work structure including a circular outer ring disposed against they inner surface of said saucer and spaced vfrom saidsaucer rim, and ribs disposed within said ring and integrally joined to said ring and to each other, said ribs all having their surfaces reinotefrom the inner surface of said saucer disposed substantially in a common plane parallel to the surface portion of said ring nearest the rim of `said saucer and at least some of said ribs having their inner surfaces at least in part convexly congruent to the inner concave surface of said vsaucer and each rib having a length di'- mension parallelto said plane, a `Width dimension perpendicular to said4 plane and less than said lengthdirnension and a thickness dimension parallel to said plane and perpendicular to said length dimensin and lessthan said width dimensvion. p y

2. In combination with a saucer having a substantially circular rim and an inner concave surface of spheroidal shape within said rim, a cup supporting grid removably mounted in said saucer and comprising an open work structure including a circular outer ring disposed against the inner surface of said saucer and spaced from said saucer rim, and ribs disposed within said ring and integrally joined to said ring and to each other, said ribs all having their surfaces remote from the inner surface of said saucer disposed substantially in a common plane parallel to the surface portion of said ring nearest the rim of said saucer and at least some of said ribs havingy their inner surfaces at least in part convexly congruent to the inner concave surface of said saucer and each rib having a length dimension parallel to said plane, a width dimension perpendicular to said plane and less than said length dimension and a thickness dimension parallel to said plane and perpendicular to said length dimension and less than said width dimension, and means connected between said ring and the rim of said saucer detachably securing said grid in said saucer.

3. In combination with a saucer having a substantially circular rim and an inner concave surface of spheroidal shape within said rim, a cup supporting grid removably mounted in said .saucer and comprising an open Work structure including a circular outer ring disposed against the inner surface of said saucer and spaced from said saucer rim, and ribs disposed within said ring and integrally joined to said ring and to each other, said ribs having their surfaces remote from the inner surface of said saucer disposed substantially in a plane parallel to and spaced from the surface of said ring nearest the rim of said saucer in a direction away from the rim.l of said saucer and at least some of said ribs having their inner surfaces at least in part convexly congruent to the inner concave surface of said saucer, at least some of said ribs having portions of their surfaces adjacent the inner surface of said saucer spaced from the inner surface f said saucer to provide passages for the ow of liquid from the outer portion toward the center of the inner surface of said saucer, and each of said ribs having a length dimension parallel to said plane, a Width dimension perpendicular to said plane and less than said length dimension and a thickness dimension parallel to said plane and perpendicular to said length dimension and less than said Width dimension.

4. In combination with a saucer having a substantially circular rim and an inner concave surface of spheroidal shape within said rim, a cup supporting grid removably mounted in said saucer and comprising an open Work structure including a circular outer ring disposed against the inner surface of said saucer in spaced relationship to said saucer rim, and ribs having a substantially rectangular cross sectional shape the major dimension of which extends in a direction from the rim to the center of said saucer, and other ribs disposed within said ring and integrally joined to said ring and to said first named ribs and having their surfaces remote from the inner surface of said saucer disposed substantially in a plane parallel to and spaced from the surface portion of said ring nearest the rim of said saucer in a direction away from said saucer rim, at least some of said ribs having their inner surfaces at least in part convexly congruent to the inner concave surface of said saucer land each of said ribs having a length dimension parallel to said plane, a Width dimension perpendicular to said plane and less than said length dimension and a thickness dimension parallel to said plane and perpendicular to said length dimension and less than said width dimension.

" MARTIN F. BABSKI.

References cited in the fue of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 125,876 Booth Apr. 23, 1872 261,811 Coues July 25, 1882 361,742 Bennett Apr. 26, 1887 503,508 Walter Aug. 15, 1893 566,479 Sellman Aug. 25, 1896 943,162 Schlesinger Dec. 14, 1909 948,434 Scott Feb. 8, 1910 998,322 Bone July 18, 1911 2,034,478 Levy Mar. 17, 1936 2,117,266 Adams May 17, 1938 2,338,296 Meyer Jan. 4, 1944 2,565,046 Rooth Aug. 21, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date Great Britain Jan. 1, 1908 2,919 Great Britain Aug. 26, 1874 18,899 Switzerland Sept. 29, 1899 19,337 Great Britain Sept. 26, 1899 165,617 Great Britain July 7, 1921 217,689 Great Britain June 26, 1924 235,951 Great Britain June 25, 1925 299,659 Great Britain Nov. 1, 1928 Great Britain Jan. 27, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US125876 *Apr 23, 1872OImprovement in butter-dish drainers
US261811 *Jul 25, 1882 Samuel f
US361742 *Dec 13, 1886Apr 26, 1887 Frederick bennett
US503508 *Apr 11, 1893Aug 15, 1893 w walter
US566479 *Oct 12, 1895Aug 25, 1896 John sellman
US943162 *Sep 8, 1909Dec 14, 1909Leo SchlesingerVegetable-dish.
US948434 *Mar 24, 1909Feb 8, 1910Miles W ScottDish.
US998322 *Mar 13, 1909Jul 18, 1911William H BoneFlower-holder.
US2034478 *Nov 8, 1935Mar 17, 1936Cornelius A LevyOyster plate
US2117266 *Aug 24, 1936May 17, 1938Adams Irene MFood form
US2338296 *Apr 11, 1941Jan 4, 1944Meyer Fred PCarving rack
US2565046 *Jan 11, 1950Aug 21, 1951Rooth Josephine BRoaster tray and platter
CH18899A * Title not available
GB165617A * Title not available
GB217689A * Title not available
GB235951A * Title not available
GB299659A * Title not available
GB542788A * Title not available
GB187402919A * Title not available
GB189919337A * Title not available
GB190800083A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2787897 *Dec 12, 1955Apr 9, 1957Renold Taylor ClarenceDrainage grill for cup-and-saucer
US3301429 *Oct 29, 1963Jan 31, 1967Mcclain Ross OSaucer pad, cover or the like
US3756681 *Jun 23, 1971Sep 4, 1973Int Technical AssistanceContainer
US4995524 *Apr 2, 1990Feb 26, 1991Welles Franklin GDripless saucer
US5139166 *Oct 15, 1991Aug 18, 1992Smith Sharon LContainer including plate with drain insert
US7926414 *Feb 15, 2009Apr 19, 2011Justine Marie WolcottMaterial for a manual drip coffee cone
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/23.83, D07/624.1, 312/351
International ClassificationA47G19/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/2283
European ClassificationA47G19/22D