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Publication numberUS2660328 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1953
Filing dateSep 29, 1952
Priority dateSep 29, 1952
Publication numberUS 2660328 A, US 2660328A, US-A-2660328, US2660328 A, US2660328A
InventorsAverill Charles C
Original AssigneeUnion Steel Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible stacking receptacle
US 2660328 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1953 c. c. AvERxLL COLLAPSIBLE sTAcKING RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 R. w/H mw VA m 6 /WW y m /ITTORNEX Patented Nov. 24, 1953 COLLAPSIBLE STACKING RECEPTACLE Charles C. Averill, Albion, Mich., assigner to Union Steel Products Company, Albion, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application September 29, 1952, Serial No. 312,109

6 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in collapsible stacking receptacles.

The main objects of this invention are:

First, to provide a stacking receptacle formed entirely of wire or light rod stock, one which may be compactly collapsed, and at the same time when erected is strong and rigid and capable of withstanding heavy loads when the receptacles are stacked.

Second, to provide a collapsible stacking receptacle embodying these advantages which may be economically produced and may be handled by lifting trucks.

Objects relating to details and economies of the invention will appear from the description to follow. The invention is defined and pointed out in the claims.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. l is a top perspective view of a preferred embodiment of my invention in erected form.

Fig. 2 is a plan view o the receptacle partially collapsed.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view in vertical section on a line corresponding to line 3 3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. i is a fragmentary side elevational view illustrating a pair of the receptacles in stacked relation.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view in section on a line corresponding to line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 fragmentary sde elevational view of a modied form or embodiment of my invention, a pair oi receptacles being shown in stacked relation.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view in section on a line corresponding to line T-1 of Fig. 6.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated the sidewalls designated generally as A-A are formed of a vertical series of spaced parallel slats I and a horizontal series of spaced parallel slats 2 disposed in crossed relation and welded together at their crossing points. The horizontal slats have laterally turned end portions 3 at their diagonally opposite ends, there being a plurality of vertical slats i secured to these laterally turned ends and coacting therewith to constitute end wall portions B integral with the side walls. The lower ends of the vertical slats of the side walls have inturned extensions 4 connected by a plu.- rality of horizontal slats 5 and constituting bottom supports designated generally by the numerals C-C.

The end walls, designated generally by the numerals D-D are formed of vertical slats 'l and horizontal slats 8 fixedly connected at their crossing points as by welding. The bottom, designated generally by the numeral E is formed of longitudinal slats 9 and transverse slats i0 lixedly connected at their crossing points. The end walls are hingedly or swingably connected at one vertical edge to the adjacent vertical end wall members, and at their other vertical edge to the adjacent edges of the side walls.

The hinges are desirably helically coiled members Il which are spiralled about adjacent vertical slats as illustrated.

The bottom is hingedly connected to one of the longitudinal slats of one of the bottom support members by means of a helically coiled hinge member l2. This connection permits the bottom being swung to erected supported relation on the bottom support members, or swung to a collapsed position against the inner side of the side wall to which it is hingedly connected as shown in Fig. 2.

'This arrangement of walls and bottom is that shown in my companion application, the claims Y thereto being presented in that application. I

have used the term side and end walls as a matter of convenience in describing, and it will be understood that the proportions of the walls may be as desired and the receptacles are frequently square.

The stacking members I3 of my present invention are formed of heavy wire or rod stock and comprise spaced parallel side members i4, the upper ends of which extend above the walls, and the lower ends of which extend below the bottoms and constitute legs and are conformed to constitute stacking lugs. The lower ends of the side members I4 are diverged laterally at l5 and merge into the inward oiisets I, which constitutes shoulders for the stacking lug portions Il which extend downwardly from the shoulders I8. The side members I3 have inward loop-like offsets I 3 above the walls constituting rests i9 for the stacking lug shoulders I6. The top crosspiece connects the upper arms of the offsets and in eiect coact therewith to provide sockets for the stacking lugs I?. When the erected receptacles are superimposed the loads of the upper receptacle are carried entirely by the uprights which are desirably Welded to each of the horizontal slats as indicated at 2l at the left of Fig. 4. l

The crosspieces 20 of the uprights also constitute handles for the receptacles. When desired the loaded receptacles may be handled by lift trucks and lift trucks are desirable for use in stacking. The legs support the bottom so that the forks of the trucks may be inserted below the bottom. It is desirable that the forks should be inserted far enough so that they engage both bottom members C.

In the embodiment of my invention shown in Figs. 6 and the `lowerends of the nplig-hts have inward Aoffsets 22, while the upper ends of the upright side members I3 are laterally odset at 23 to space them so that the legs or stacking lug portions 22 may be received between them VELS .iS shown in Figs. 6 and 7. The legs or lugs Yare provided with a U-shaped stop member 2 5 which rests upon the inturned ends 2;5 at the fupper :ends of the uprights, the top crosspieces of the uprights then being on the irnier .sideoi .the stacking lugs. The stacking uprights are effective in bracing and reinforcing the walls to which Vthey are connected, and they carry the load of superimposed receptacles Aso that the .grid-like walls are not distorted or subjected to loads other than contained within the individual receptacle.

,have not attempted to illustrate or .describe other adaptations or embodiments .which I Icontemplate, as I believe this disclosure will Venable those skilled in .the art to embody or adapt my Ainvention as may be V.desir-ed.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire .to secure b y Letters Patent is:

l. In a collapsible stacking receptacle the combination oi opposed pairs of walls comprising spaced `parallel horizontal and .vertical slats nxedly connected at :their `crossing points, adjacent l.ends of the walls being lhingedly connected, a bottom .comprising crossed slats i'ixedly connested at their .crossing points lhinged-ly .connected to .one wall of an opposed pair to be collapsed upwardly against the inner side thereof when the receptacle is collapsed, the other wall or the pair having a support for the bottom when thereeeptacle is in erected position, and combined reintorcing .uprights and stacking members formed of rod stock and comprising spaced side members and top and botto-m crosspieces 'integral therewith, the sidie members being xedly secured to the horizontal slats of the vopposed walls with the upper ends of the uprights projecting above the walls and their lower ends projecting below the walls, said side members having laterally ,downwardly -divergii'le portions adjacent their lower ends merging into inward offsets constituting stacking lug shoulders `spaced upwardly relative to the lower ends of the uprights which constitute stacking lugs, the upper ends .of the side members having inwardly oil-set loops positioned above the tops of the walls with the upper lcrosspieces outwardly spaced relative to the walls to receive vthe stacking lugs of a superimposed receptacle with the top crosspieces on the outer sides thereof.

2. In a collapsible stacking receptacle the combination of opposed pairs of walls comprising spaced parallel horizontal and vertical slats fixedly connected at their crossing points, adjacent ends of the walls being hingedly connected, a bottom Ycomprising crossed slats Aiixedly connected at their crossing points 'hingedly .connected to one wall of an opposed pair to 'be collapsed up- P wardly against `the inner side thereof when the receptacle is collapsed, the other wall of the pair having `a support for the bottom when the receptacle is in .erected position, and combined re info rcing uprights .and stacking members formed of rod stock and comprising spaced side members and top and bottom crosspieces integral therewith, the side members being xedly secured to the horizontal slats of the opposed walls with the upper ends of the uprights projecting above the walls and their lower ends projecting below the walls and offset to constitute stacking lug shoulders ,spaced `.upwardly relative to the lower ends of the uprights, the upper ends ofthe upright side members being offset above the walls to constitute rests for said shoulders with the upper crosspieces at the outer sides of the stacking lugs of -avsuperimposed receptacle.

3,. Th a collapsible stacking receptacle the combiliartion .0I `opposed pairs of walls comprising spaced parallel horizontal and vertical slats nxedly connected at their crossing points, adjacent ends of the walls being hingedly connected, a bottom comprising crossed slats iredly connected at their crossing points hingedly connected to .one Wall of .an opposed pair to be collapsed upwardly against the inner side thereof when the receptacle is collapsed, the other wall of the pair having .a support for the bottom when the receptacle is in erected position, and combined reinforcing upright `and stacking members formed of rod stock and comprising spaced side members secured to .the horizontal slats of the side walls, and integral crosspieces at the upper and lower .ends of the uprights, the crosspieces at the lower end of the uprights having downward osets therein providing shouldered stacking lugs, the upper ends of the uprights having inward odsets therein .constituting rests for the shoulders of said stacking lug when the lugs are .disposed on the inner side of sai-d top crosspieces.

4. In a collapsible stacking receptacle the ccmbination .or walls hingedly ,connected at their adjacent vertical end edges -for collapsing, a bottom hingedly connected to one side wall to swing upwardly to 4collapsed position at the side thereof, and uprights formed of rod stock and comprising spaced side members, and integral crosspieces at their upper and lower ends, said uprights being xedly secured to opposed walls with the upper ends .of the uprights projecting above the walls and their lower ends projecting below the walls to constitute legs and stacking lugs, said side members having laterally and downwardly diverging side portions adjacent their lower ends merging into inward offsets constituting stacking Vlug shoulders spaced upwardly relative to the lower ends of the uprights, :the upper ends of the uprights having offsets therein constituting rests with which ,said shoulders `coact when the stacking lugs of the superimposed receptacle vare disposed on :the inner sides of the top crosspieces.

5. In a collapsible stacking receptacle .the combination lof walls hingedly connected at their adjacent vertical end edges for collapsing, a bottom hineedl-y connected to one side wall to swing upwardly to .collapsed position at the Aside thereof, and uprights comprising spaced side members, and 4connecting crosspieces at their upper and lower ends, said uprights being ixedly secured to opposed walls with the upper ends of the uprights projecting above the walls and the lower l.ends projecting below the walls and oset to `ccnlstitute shouldered stacking lugs, the upper ends `of uprghts having offsets therein constituting rests with which the said stacking `lug shoulders coaot when .the stacking lugs of a superimposed receptacle are disposed on .the inner sides of the tcp crosspieces.

6. ,Ina .collapsible stackingreceptacle the combination of walls hingedly connected at their adjacent vertical end edges for collapsing, a bottom hingedly connected to one side Wall to swing upwardly to collapsed position at the side thereof, and uprights comprising spaced side members, and connecting crosspieces at their upper and lower ends, said uprights being xedly secured to opposed Walls with the upper ends of the uprights projecting above the walls and the lower ends projecting below the Walls and offset to con- 10 6 stitute shouldered stacking lugs, the upper ends of uprights having oisets therein constituting rests with which the said stacking lug shoulders coact When the stacking lugs of a superimposed receptacle are disposed in retaining engagement with the upper ends of the uprights of the lower receptacle.

CHARLES C. AVERILL.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2780381 *Aug 9, 1954Feb 5, 1957Tri State Engineering CompanyShipping and storage crates
US2781901 *Jan 11, 1954Feb 19, 1957Clark John RBrick cage
US2905335 *Feb 18, 1958Sep 22, 1959Nathan GilbertStorage and display device
US3146891 *Feb 20, 1961Sep 1, 1964Benner Nawman IncFolding tray construction
US3314549 *Aug 24, 1964Apr 18, 1967Fetherston Frank TCollapsible shipping-display unit
US3349939 *May 18, 1964Oct 31, 1967Union Steel Prod CoPortable and collapsible stacking bins or crates
US3372829 *May 18, 1964Mar 12, 1968Union Steel Prod CoPortable and collapsible stacking bins or crates
US3378161 *Jan 10, 1966Apr 16, 1968Sed MannheimCollapsible stacking receptacle
US3784044 *Jul 28, 1972Jan 8, 1974Bekaert Sa NvWire box or crate
US3917103 *Oct 11, 1973Nov 4, 1975Beretta OscarContainers made in metallic wires
US4015743 *Aug 15, 1975Apr 5, 1977Societe Anonyme a Responsabilite Limitee: TechnifilContainers made in metallic wires
US4471988 *Sep 1, 1982Sep 18, 1984Champion International CorporationCutter blade holder
US4615277 *Dec 22, 1983Oct 7, 1986Haye Cornelis Franciscus DeStacking element and a gallery, platform or the like, provided with such a stacking element
US6029399 *Jun 26, 1998Feb 29, 2000Mercer; Wayne A.Vertical bench
US7568581 *Feb 13, 2003Aug 4, 2009Armor Inox SaStacking unit comprising at least one chamber for housing a food product such as ham
US7617941 *Aug 1, 2006Nov 17, 2009Sabritas, S. De R.L. De C.V.Modular wire display rack
US7997214 *Jun 30, 2009Aug 16, 2011Danny NessOffshore cargo rack for use in transferring palletized loads between a marine vessel and an offshore platform
US8490552Aug 16, 2011Jul 23, 2013Danny NessOffshore cargo rack for use in transferring palletized loads between a marine vessel and an offshore platform
US8826832Jul 22, 2013Sep 9, 2014Daniel W. NessOffshore cargo rack for use in transferring palletized loads between a marine vessel and an offshore platform
DE2350455A1 *Oct 8, 1973Apr 18, 1974TechnifilPerfektionierung von drahtbehaeltern mit zum boden hin klappbaren wandteilen
EP2226260A1 *Jul 28, 2004Sep 8, 2010Robert PapplerFood container, system for distributing food and method for creating a vacuum in a food container
WO2002024535A2 *Sep 17, 2001Mar 28, 2002Metallverarbeitung Koegel GmbhBasket, in particular a sterilisation, transport and/or storage basket
WO2005012128A2 *Jul 28, 2004Feb 10, 2005Robert PapplerFood container and suitable method for sealing said container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/6, 206/511, 108/55.1, 206/386, 108/53.5, 220/485, 108/56.1
International ClassificationB65D21/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/26, B65D21/0211
European ClassificationB65D21/02E2, B65D7/26