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Publication numberUS2661954 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1953
Filing dateJul 14, 1953
Priority dateJul 14, 1953
Publication numberUS 2661954 A, US 2661954A, US-A-2661954, US2661954 A, US2661954A
InventorsKoci Jerry C
Original AssigneeChicago Coin Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Amusement and target practicing device
US 2661954 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, 1953 Filed July 14, 1953 J., C. KOCI AMUSEMENT AND TARGET PRACTICING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR. daezr 6, (0a

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4 Sheets-Sheet 3 VII v i 2 INVENTOR. BY Ma ie) 6- 1(66/ Dec. 8, 1953 J. c. KOCl AMUSEMENT AND TARGET PRACTICING DEVICE Filed July 14, 1953 J. C. KOCI AMUSEMENT AND TARGET PRACTI ICING DEVICE Dec. 8, 19 5 3 4 Shee ts-Sheet 4 Filed July 14, 1953 7'0 TIMING swn-cn AND I OTHER SIDE OF Powln.

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z/mley d/(oa/ BY i i ///5 ATZv/Q/VEX l atented Dec. 8, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AMUSEMENT AND TARGET PRACTICING DEVICE Jerry C. Koci, Barrington, Ill., assignor to Chicago Coin Machine 00., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application July 14, 1953, Serial No. 367,805

Claims. (01. 273-1012) The invention has for one of its principal obwithin a movable cockpit so that by proper manipulation the cockpit may be moved horizontally and/or vertically about a fixed center point.

Another object of the invention is to provide a target and score registering board having target elements thereon, at which. targets the entire movable cockpit must be aimed to register a score.

Still another and equally important object of my invention is the provision in a device of this character of an arrangement whereby a movable vehicle body has mounted thereon a simulated gun, which, together with the vehicle body, is adapted to be aimed at target elements on a stationary target board.

Still another important object of my invention is the provision of a simple arrangement of parts that will complete an electric circuit to light certain target elements when said movable vehicle body and said gun are synchronized in a direct line with respect to the target elements. 7

Still another and equally important object of my invention is to provide a simple and eflicient pneumatic means for moving a simulated vehicle cockpit horizontally and vertically about a fixed point.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the novel combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter described and claimed.

The invention will be best understood by reference to the accompanying drawings showing the preferred form of construction, and in which:

Fig. l is a perspective view of my invention, together with a target and score registering board;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side view of the mounting for thesimulated vehicle cockpit embodied in my invention, taken substantially on line 2--2 of Fig.8;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2';

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view of the sup-- port for the simulated vehicle body;

Fig. 5 is a sectional detail view taken substantially on line 55 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the interior of the enclosed nose portion of the simulated vehicle cockpit;

Fig. 7 is a sectional detail view taken on line '!'i of Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary end view of the support for my simulated vehicle cockpit taken substantially on line 88 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 9 is a topplan view of the operating mechanism as employed in my invention, taken substantially on line 9-9 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 10 is a sectional detail view taken substantially on line I0I 0 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a schematic detail view of the electric circuit as embodied in my invention; and

Fig. 12 is a schematic detail view of an electric and pneumatic circuit as embodied in my invention.

In Fig. 1 a movable simulated vehicle cockpit is indicated at Ill. This cockpit comprises a seat member II, a backrest I2 and an enclosed nose portion l3. Fixedly secured and carried atop the nose portion 13 is a simulated gun l4.

A target or score registering board i5 is adapted to be associated with my device as shown in Fig. 1, wherein such target and score registering board i5 is positioned in front of and at right angles to the cockpit I if! and is supported by legs I? attached to the platform 18 of the vehicle cockpit iii. This target board it may be provided with a plurality of target elements It, as shown in Fig. 1. In the present instance, these elements it are lights adapted to be illuminated by the proper synchronization of a line of sight between the gun It and the lights in a hereinafter described manner. The cockpit it is sup' ported from the platform 18 by a hollow pedestal 19, which pedestal has a base portion is which is secured to the platform It in any suitable manner, such as by screws 2!. One end of the hollow pedestal I9 is closed by a reduced bearing 22 frictionally fitted therein. To the top of the reduced bearing 22 is attached a bearing plate 23 provided with a pair of bearing blocks 26, each having a corresponding bearing cap which is adapated to be attached to the bearing blocks 2:? in any suitable manner, such as by screws 26, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4. These bearing blocks 24, as well as the bearing caps 25, are provided with semi-circular cut-out portions it and 25' respectively and are so arranged that when the caps 25 are secured to the blocks 24, these cut-out portions 25' and 24' respectively, will form a circular bore.

Pivotally journaled in this circular bore is a supporting rod 21. This rod 2? extends upon the bearing blocks 22, as shown in Figs. 2, 4 and 8, and has its end portions journaled through a pair of spaced apart parallelly extending'angle irons 28 beneath the floor board 29 of the cockpit II).

In the above-described manner, and from the specific arrangement Of parts, it is readily seen that the cockpit I0 is supported on the pedestal I9 for pivotal movement around the long axis of .3 the supporting rod 2?. Such pivotal movement is accomplished in the hereinafter described manner.

The bearing plate 23 has extending downwardly therefrom through the reduced bearing 22 and within the hollow pedestal 19 a shaft 3%. This shaft 39 extends below the base 2%) of the pedestal l9 and projects through an aperture 3! formed in the platform I8, as shown in Fig. 4. The lower free end of the shaft has fixedly secured thereto an arm 32 which extends laterally with respect to the long axis of the shaft 30. One end 33 of this arm 32 is pivotally connected to a link 34. The link 34 has at its free end an enlarged head 35 which is provided with a threaded bore 36. Into this bore 36 is threaded one end of a piston rod 31. A look nut 38 carried by the piston rod 3? is employed to lock the rod 31 in the bore 36, as viewed in Fig. 5. This piston rod 3'! forms an actuating part of an air cylinder 39, which is pivotally carried beneath the platform 58. This cylinder 39 is secured to the platform 28 by a bracket Mi which is provided with a depending arm ll to which the free end d2 of the cylinder 39 is attached.

On one side of the pedestal l9 and formed integral therewith is a pair of laterally extending bracket arms 33. These brackets 43 are provided with a vertically extending bore M, through which a suitable lock pin 45 is adapated to be disposed. Between these brackets i3 is a link 46 which has a corresponding bore t? which will receive the lock pin 45 so as to fixedly secure the link 46 between the brackets 43. The free end of this link it is pivotally connected to a piston rod is of a second air cylinder 59, as viewed in Fig. 2. This air cylinder fail is pivotally connected to the floor board 29 in a manner much like the cylinder 39 is connected to the platform i8.

The two air cylinders 39 and 50 are connected through suitable hose connections 5! to an air compressor 52 carried by the forwardly extend ing portions 53 of the angle irons 28 within the nose portion 43 of the cockpit iii, as viewed in Fig. 7.

From the foregoing described arrangement or parts, it is readily apparent that through the action of the air cylinders 39 and 5G acting upon the shaft 30 and the piston rod 48 respectively, the cockpit it is pneumatically pivotable around the supporting pedestal l9.

Within the nose portion I3 of the cockpit i0 is a compartment 55. This compartment is formed by a bottom wall 55 supported on the floor board 29 of the cockpit iii by angle irons 55 and which angle irons 56 extend upwardly from the supporting angle irons 28. Into this compartment 55 is slidably fitted a drawer 58 which is made up of side walls es and 59', a bottom wall 5%), and a face plate 6|. This face plate 6i is provided with side flanges 62 by which the drawer 58 is securely fastened within the compartment 56. The rear portion of the bottom wall 66, adjacent its end thereof, provides a partially vertical partition 63 having a circular aperture 6:. formed therein. The face plate 6i is provided with a corresponding aperture 65. Slidably journaled through the aperture 55 of the face plate GI and the aperture 64 of the partition 63, and extending throughout the length of the drawer 58, is a shaft 66.

The outer free end of this shaft 66 is provided with an operating lever 67, which in this case is a simulated semicircular steering wheel '61.

The shaft 66 is slidably held within the drawer 58 by supporting brackets 69 and H! which are carried by the bottom wall tfi of the drawer 58. To the rear of the bracket 69 the shaft 6% is provided with a reduced portion H, which eX- tends to the end of the shaft 36. Such reduced portion H provides a shoulder 12. Slidably journaled on the shaft 65 adjacent the shoulder 12 is a washer is provided with a sleeve id extending rearwardly therefrom. Adjacent the rear end 15 of the shaft 65 is journaled a stop washer it secured to the shaft 63 by a cotter pin Ti. This stop washer i6 is of a diameter slightly smaller than the aperture 65 of the partition 63 through which the shaft 66 is journaled. Immediately forward of this stop washer I5 is a corresponding washer 73 having a like sleeve 79 which extends forwardly with respect to the stop washer it. These washers i3 and 78 and corresponding sleeves 1 S and T9 are freely slidable on the shaft 55 and are separated from each other by an expansion spring Sit as viewed in Fig. 9.

Adjacent the bracket 69 and on either side of the shaft 66 are micro switches 51 and 82. These switches 8i and 32 are provided with contact leaves 81 and 82' respectively. One end of each of these contact leaves 8| and 82 is provided with rollers 83 and 83. These rollers 83 and 83' are positioned to bear upon the washers l3 and 78 1 shown) washer 13 thus permitting a contact to be made by the opposite end of the leaf 8! within the micro switch 8!. In reversing the procedure when the shaft cs is withdrawn from within the drawer 58, the stop washer it will pass through the aperture iii of the partition 63 and will 'engage the washer i8 and will slide the same forward in the direction of the face plate ti. The movement of the washer it will permit the roller 83' to roll off the edge thereof thus permitting the leaf 82' to make contact within the switch 82. It should be noted that as the washers i3 and '58 are freely slidable on the shaft 6t they are restrained from moving in both directions. The washer 53 when the shaft 66 is withdrawn from the drawer will bear upon the bracket in and be prevented from movement in that rection. The washer re will bear upon the partition 63 when the shaft 55 is pushed inwardly of the drawer es and thus be prevented from moving in a corresponding direction.

From the foregoing, it is readily apparent that the switch 8! may be actuated while the switch 82 remains inoperative, the same being true in reverse.

Positioned within the drawer ed and between the brackets 69 and Hi and extending upwardly from the side walls 59 and 59 are supporting arms 84 and 85. These supporting arms 85 and 85 are attached to the side walls '59 and 59 in any suitable manner such as by screws 83 as shown in Fig. 10. At the base of these support-' ing arms as and t5 and within the side walls 59 and 59 and attached by the same screws 35 are a second pair of micro switches 8i and 88. These switches 8'! and 88 have spring-urged contact leaves positioned at the top thereof.

On the shaft 66 in approximately the same plane as the switches 8'! and 88 there is fastened an actuating bar 8%. provided with vertical wings 9t and 9!, which terminate into fingers 9t and 9! These fingers 9t ands! extend in an upward and outward direction with respect to each other, as shown in Fig. 10. The upper end portion'of the supporting arms 85 and 85 is provided with inwardly extending supporting fingers 92 and t2, which are attached to the fingers Q and. Si by springs 93 and 94. With this arrangement of parts the actuating bar 89, although fixedly attached to the shaft 66 is provided with wings 9t and 9! which are rotatable to a limited degree upon rotation of the shaft 56. For example, when the shaft 86 is rotated in a clockwise direction, the wing 99 will move in a corresponding direction against the action ofthe spring 93. The wing 90 will rotate until the finger 98 thereof comes into contact with the leaf of the micro switch 3?. The same is true of the wing 9i, the finger $1, the leaf of the switch 88. The purpose and function of individually making contact through the switches 3i and 8t, as well as the switches 8! and 82, will be hereinafter described.

To rotate the vehicle cockpit ill horizontally about the pedestal IS, the following operation takes place:

The operator of the device will, by turning the steering wheel 6?, rotate the shaft 56, thus causing the actuating bar 89 to turn therewith. The turning of the actuating bar 89 will cause the micro switch 81 or 88 to be closed.

The micro switches 81 and 88 are connected in circuit to electromagnetic actuating valves #3 and #4 respectively through conductors 95. The other side of these switches are connected through conductors as to a power source 97. These valves #3 and #4 control the passage of compressed air from the compressor 52 to the air cylinder 38. These valves are of standard construction and make up no part of the invention. The valve #3 which is actuated by the closing of the switch 8? permits compressed air to pass from the cornpressor 52 through the hose 5| to the cylinder 39, which compressed air will force the piston rod 3? outwardly of the cylinder 39. The valve #4 is connected by conductors 95 to the micro switch 88. When this micro switch 83 is closed the valve #4 permits the compressed air to enter the cylinder St to force the rod 3'! back in the cylinder. By such movement of the rod 3?, being forced in or out of the cylinder 39, the cockpit It is rotatable about the pedestal i9. 7

For the operator to eifect an up and down movement of the cockpit nose it, the steering wheel 68 will be pushed inwardly of the compart ment 54 to bring the nose down, or the steering wheel will be pulled outwardly of the compartment to pull the nose up. Such movement of the wheel 61 will impart movement to the shaft 55 movement of the shaft 66 Would cause the roller This actuating bar 89 is a. 83 to ride off the Washer 13, thus permitting the contact leaf Bl to make contact within the switch 8!. The switch 8! is connected through conductors 98 to valve #l, thus opening the valve #I and permitting compressed air to be admitted from the compressor 52 through the hose 5|. This compressed air will force the rod t8 inward of the cylinder 53 and thus, through the link 46, by which the cylinder 56 is connected to the pedestal [9, the cockpit nose will be forced down.

In reversing the operation, if the operator desires to raise the nose of the cockpit It, the steering wheel 61 will be pulled outwardly of the compartment 54. This movement will cause the shaft 66 to slide outwardly of the compartment 56. Upon movement of the shaft it, the roller 83' will ride off the washer It, thus permitting the contact leaf 82 to make contact within the switch 82. This switch 82 is connected through conductors $8 to valve #2 and upon the making of contact within the switch 32, the valve #2 will be opened permitting the compressed air to be admitted into the cylinder 5c. The compressed air will force the rod t8 out of the cylinder 50, thus pivoting the vehicle cockpit It about the shaft 33.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that the horizontal and vertical movement of the vehicle cockpit It is completely controlled by the manual manipulation of the steering wheel iii.

As aforementioned, associated with the movable vehicle cockpit ii], is a score registering board I5. This board it may be provided with target elements it. These elements may be lights adapted to be illuminated upon proper completion of an electrical circuit. These target elements, as shown in Fig. l, are depicted as being located on a map of the continents of the world with each element thereof being positioned in various scattered points thereon. These target elements It are consecutively numbered and are adapted to be successively illuminated. These target elements It are arranged in the electrical circuit as shown in Fig. 11. The elements it, at one side thereof, are connected through conductors 99 to a power source 57. The other side of the target elements it are connected through conductors Illa to a plurality of holding relays "3!, which relays Hil will be energized by the completion of the electrical circuit to the target elements It.

To energize the target elements It, as contained on the target board IS, the device is provided With a novel combination of parts which performs this function and complete an electric circuit upon the proper manipulation of the movable vehicle cockpit is and upon creating a direct line of sight between the simulated gun M carried by the cockpit it and the target elements I To accomplish the above function, there is se cured beneath the floor boards 253 positioned between the angle irons 28 to the rea: of the pedestal H a target contact disc 592. This disc m2 is connected to the angle irons 28 in any suitable manner, such as by spot welding, as shown in Fig. 2. The face of this disc Hi2 is provided with a plurality of scattered contact heads I83, which contact heads are connected in the electrical circuit, as shown in Fig. 1.1. Below the contact disc I02 and carried by a side wall of the pedestal it by means of right angle brackets Its spaced apart and in confronting relation is a contact arm it. This contact arm 35 is pivotally mounted between the brackets iml on a supporting pin it.

To retain thearm I05 in an approximately verti cal position, there is employed a coil spring IN. This spring H31 embraces the pin M6 and has one free end thereof bearing upon the arm H as shown in Fig. '7. At the free end of this contact arm its there is provided a'contact head Hill. This contact head 56% is yieldably maintained against the disc Hi2 by the spring not.

The function of the contact disc I02 and the contact arm 195 is as follows:

As the contact d sc is fixedly supported to the circuit to the target element designated number i 1, thus inf rming the operator that this is the target at which to aim the simulated gun. Thus, as the operator of the device aims the movable cockpit i9 and the simulated gun It at the first numbered and illuminated target element, the contact head itil of the contact arm 565, will come into engagement with the contact head is? of the contact disc H32, thus completing a circuit to the next succeeding target.

The circuit, as shown in Fig. 11, discloses a method whereby the target element It, designated as number i, will be illuminated upon the closing of the actuating switch E59. This target element will remain illuminated until the simulated gun has been successfully aimed thereat At this time the contact arm I05, together with its contact head its, will come into contact with the properly designated contact head Hi3 cf the contact disc W2, whereby the holding relay lei will be energized. This relay actuates a threepole switch. The energiaation of this relay 591 will break the contact of two of these poles and make contact on the third. When such action takes place, the circuit to the target element #l is broken, while the circuit to the target element #2, through the conductors 99 and 10B is complete, thereby illuminating such target element #2. For each number of target elements, it is therefore clear that there must be a holding relay Etl which actuates a like three-pole switch as hereinabove described.

Thus, as the operator of the device aims the movable cockpit id and the simulated gun M at the first numbered target element, the contact head I55 of the contact arm IE5, will come into engagement with the contact head 593 of the contact disc H32, thus completing the circuit to thatparticular target element.

It may be desired that this device be coin-con trolled. In that event, in the electrical circuit, as shown in Fig. 11, the actuating switch I09 will be coin-controlled. To the coin-actuated switch its, there will be incorporated in the electrical circuit a timing switch H8, thus permitting the operation of the device for a predetermined period of time.

The device will best operate when it is equipped with a cut-off switch iii, which switch is in the electrical circuit, shown in Fig. 12. It is desirable that this switch be closed at the end of the cycle of the timing switch H0. The purpose of this cut-out switch H I is to open the valve when the timing switch has completed its cycle. By opening the valve #4 at such time, any and all compressed air contained in the hose connec- 8 tions 5| will be forced into the valve #1, thus causing the nose l3 of the cockpit ill to move in a downward direction, indicating to the operator that the operation of the device is at an end.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred form of construction for carrying my invention into effect, this is capable of variation and modification without departing from the spirit of the invention. I, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the precise details of construction set forth, but desire to avail myself of such variations and modifications as come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. An amusement game and target practicing apparatus comprising a movable simulated vehicle having a cockpit and a simulated gun carried by the nose of the vehicle and extending for-- wardly with respect to said cockpit, a target structure including a target area in spaced conironting relation with respect to the nose of said vehicle and substantially at right angles with respect thereto and having target elements in said area to be illuminated, means for supporting said vehicle for movement relative to the target structurc, means for moving said vehicle relative to the target structure, means for illuminating said target elements including an electric circuit, a power source in said circuit, a plurality of coin tacts in said circuit and carried by and movable with said vehicle and each having circuit connection with a certain one of said target elements, and a flexible member having a contact element in confronting relation with respect to said plurality of contacts and adapted to engage a certain one of said contact elements upon movement of said vehicle and in accordance with the position of said vehicle with respect to said target structure and with the synchronization of the line of sight of said gun with said certain one of said target elements.

2. An amusement game and target practicing apparatus comprising a movable simulated vehicle having a cockpit and a simulated gun carried by the nose of said vehicle and extending forwardly with respect thereto, a target structure including a target area in spaced confronting relation with respect to the nose of the vehicle and substantially at right angles with respect thereto and having target elements in said area to be illuminated, means for supporting said vehicle for vertical tiltable movement and for axial rotation with respect to said target structure, means for vertically tilting said vehicle, means for axially rotating said vehicle, and means for illuminating said target elements including an electric circuit, a power source in said circuit, a plurality of juxta-positicned contacts in said circuit and carried by and movable with said vehicle and each having circuit connection with a certain one of said target elements, and a flexible member having a contact element disposed in confronting relation with respect to said plurality of contacts and adapted to engage a certain one of said contacts in accordance with the position of the vehicle with respect to the target wardly with respect to said cockpit, a target structure including a target area in spaced confronting relation with respect to the nose of said vehicle and substantially at right angles with respect thereto and having target elements in said area to be illuminated, means for supporting said vehicle for movement relative to the target structure, means for moving said vehicle relative to the target structure, means for illuminating said target elements including an electric circuit, a power source in said circuit, a plurality of contacts in said circuit and carried by and movable with said vehicle and each having circuit ments, and a flexible member having a contact connection with a certain one of said target eleelement in confronting relation with respect to c said plurality of contacts and adapted to engage a certain one of said contact elements upon movement of said vehicle and in accordance with the position of said vehicle with respect to said target structure and with the synchronization of the line of sight of said gun with said certain one of said target elements, and manually controlled means for said moving means.

4. An amusement game and target practicing apparatus comprising a movable simulated vehicle having a cockpit and a simulated gun carried by the nose of said vehicle and extending forwardly with respect thereto, a target structure including a target area in spaced confronting relation with respect to the nose of the vehicle and substantially at right angles with respect thereto and having target elements in said area to be illuminated, means for supporting said vehicle for vertical tiltable movement and for axial rotation with respect to said target structure, means for vertically tilting said vehicle, means for axially rotating said vehicle, means for illuminating said target elements including an electric circuit, a power source in said circuit, a plurality of iuxta-positioned contacts in said circuit and carried by and movable with said vehicle and each having circuit connection with a certain one of said target elements, and a flexible member having a contact element disposed in confront- 4 ing relation with respect to said plurality of contacts and. adapted to engage a certain one of said contacts in accordance with the position of the vehicle with respect to the target structure and with the synchronization of the line of sight of said gun with said certain one of said target elements, and manually controlled means for said tilting and rotating means.

5. An amusement game and target practicing apparatus comprising a movable simulated vehicle having a cockpit and a simulated gun carried by the nose of the vehicle and extending forwardly with respect to said cockpit, a target structure including a target area in spaced confronting relation with respect to the nose of said vehicle and substantially at right angles with respect thereto and having target elements in said area to be illuminated, means for supporting said vehicle for movement relative to the target structure, means for moving said vehicle relative to the target structure, means for successively illuminating said target elements including an electric circuit, a power source in said circuit, circuit holding means for each of said target elements in said circuit, a plurality of contacts in said circuit and carried by and movable with said vehicle and each having circuit connection with a certain one of said target elements, and a flexible member having a contact element in confronting relation with respect to said plurality of contacts and adapted to engage a certain one of said contact elements upon movement of said vehicle and in accordance with the position of said vehicle with respect to said target structure and with the synchronization of the line of sight of said gun with said certain one of said target elements.

JERRY C. KOCI.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,825,462 Link Sept. 29, 1931 2,181,948 McClellan Dec. 5, 1939 2,418,512 Johnson Apr. 8, 1947 2,527,326 New Oct. 24, 1950

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2873972 *Oct 29, 1953Feb 17, 1959Marjorie BartlettAmusement ride
US3304628 *May 21, 1965Feb 21, 1967Curtiss Wright CorpCockpit motion system for aircraft simulators
US3479750 *Feb 6, 1964Nov 25, 1969Aetna Casualty & Surety CoAutomotive vehicle simulator for demonstrating automatic self-centering of steerable automobile wheels
US3503614 *Dec 22, 1967Mar 31, 1970Hyman SuroffToy shooting gallery
US3756654 *Jan 18, 1971Sep 4, 1973Suspa FederungstechArticle of seating furniture
US4142722 *Jan 30, 1978Mar 6, 1979Atari, Inc.Seat mounted simulated weapon and target shooting game
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US4461470 *Jun 20, 1983Jul 24, 1984Mark E. AstrothSystem for adding realism to video display
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US4749180 *Jun 4, 1987Jun 7, 1988Ted BoomerMechanical surf board
US4850588 *May 13, 1988Jul 25, 1989Gilles DesjardinsBalancing apparatus for surf board
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US6733293 *Jan 25, 2002May 11, 2004Provision Entertainment, Inc.Personal simulator
US6910734 *Sep 28, 2001Jun 28, 2005Steelman Gaming TechnologyErgonomic gaming machine
US7625288May 11, 2005Dec 1, 2009Steelman Gaming TechnologyErgonomic gaming machine
US8167715Nov 5, 2009May 1, 2012Wms Gaming Inc.Adjustable playing area for electronic gaming terminal
US8702497Nov 16, 2009Apr 22, 2014Wms Gaming Inc.Video poker terminal with improved button panel
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/57, 297/181, 297/217.3, 472/130, 297/327, 297/217.6, 297/217.1, 297/217.7, 297/329
International ClassificationA63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0291
European ClassificationA63F9/02S