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Publication numberUS2662638 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1953
Filing dateAug 18, 1949
Priority dateAug 18, 1949
Publication numberUS 2662638 A, US 2662638A, US-A-2662638, US2662638 A, US2662638A
InventorsRotruck Adelbert L, Storer William C
Original AssigneeCelanese Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton
US 2662638 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1953 w. c. STORER ET AL 2,662,638

CARTON Filed Aug. 18, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 2 m" I I IHHIHIH 5 E: INVENTORS WILLIAM-C. STORER QDELBERT L.ROTRUCK fzgrmu ATTORNEYS.

Patented Dec. 15, 1953 UNITED STATblS PATENT QFFECE CARTON William C. Storer and Adelbert L. Rotruck, Narrows, Va., assignors to Celanese Corporation of America, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware This invention relates to cartons and relates more particularly to cartons for storing and shipping packages of yarn.

The bulk of the yarn produced in the textile industry is wound into packages, such as bobbins, cones, cheeses, pirns and the like. During the storing and shipping of these yarn packages they must be supported so as to prevent them from rubbing against each other or against the walls or the carton in which they are contained, since such rubbing would mar at least the outer layers of yarn on said packages. The cartons heretofore employed for storing and shipping yarn packages have included means, such as apertured inserts, for engaging the yarn packages so as to prevent movement thereof and damage to the yarn wound thereon. However, these cartons have been relatively expensive and have required a considerable amount of labor for their assembly and disassembly, thereby increasing the handling costs in storing and shipping the yarn packages. In addition, these cartons have failed to provide adequate support for the yarn packages, with the result that yarn damage frequently occurred, particularly when the loaded cartons were subjected to shocks during handling or shipping.

It is an important object of this invention to provide a carton for storing and shipping packages of yarn which will be free from the foregoing and other disadvantages of the cartons hitherto employed for this purpose, and which will. be especially simple in construction and eiiicient in use.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a carton for storing and shipping packages of yarn which will engage and support said packages so as to avoid relative displacement thereof and damage to the yarn wound thereon.

Other objects of this invention, together with certain details of construction and combinations of parts, will be apparent from the following detailed description and claims.

A preferred embodiment of our invention of a carton for storing and shipping bobbins of yarn will now described with particular reference to the accompanying drawings wherein Fig. l is a perspective view of an assembled carton, partly broken away to show the arrangement of yarn packages therein,

Figs. 2 and 3 are detail views, on an enlarged scale, of a pallet forming a part of the carton shown in Fig. 1,

Figs. 4 and 5 are detail views, on an enlarged scale, of a yarn package shelf forming a part of the carton shown in Fig. 1, and

Figs. 6 and '7 are detail views, on an enlarged scale, of a cap forming a part of the carton shown in Fig. 1.

Referring now to the drawings, the reference numeral H designates generally a pallet comprising a base II! which is supported on legs l3, whereby access to the underside of the pallet i i by the tongue or fork of a lift truck may be had. Yarn package shelves I l, having a plurality of regularly disposed pins It extending therethrough and projecting from both sides thereof are mounted on the pallet H, with the pins l5 engaging a plurality of regularly disposed apertures Iii in the base l2 to secure the yarn package shelves l l against accidental displacement. The yarn package shelves I l carry a layer ll of yarn packages, such as bobbins 68, which are held securely in place by engagement with the pins i5. Resting on the layer i? are additional yarn package shelves i l with the portion of the pins projecting from the under surface of said shelves engaging the bobbins E8 in the layer ii,

and with the portion of the pins l5 projeting from the upper surface of said shelves engaging the bobbins iii in a layer ls. Additional layers 2i, 22, 23 and 24 of bobbins l8, each supported on yarn package shelves i i, are superposed in similar manner on the layer i 9. The upper layer 24 is covered with a cap 25 that is provided with a plurality of downwardly projecting pins 28 that engage the bobbins E8 in said layer. While only a few pins 26 are shown in the cap 25, it is of course possible to provide a sufficient number of pins 26 to engage each of the bobbins it in the layer 24. A protective cover 2'. of corrugated board, cardboard or other suitable material is fitted over the several layers of bobbins i3 and the entire assembly is bound into a strong, unitary structure by means of steel straps 28 and 29.

In filling the carton of this invention, the bobbins [8 are mounted on the pins lb of the yarn package shelves Hi, and the yarn shelves with the bobbins thereon are placed on ,the base 12 with the pins l5 engaging the aper- .tures [6 to form the layer ll. yarn package shelves 44 with bobbins Hi mount- Then, additional to accommodate only fifteen bobbins I8 so that the total weight of the loaded shelf will not be excessive. With a base I2 of the size shown, three .such yarn package shelves I4 are required to support each layer of the bobbins I8. However, it is possible, by varying the design, to provide for each layer of bobbins I8 to be supported by a larger or smaller number of yarn package shelves I4.

Further to assist in packing the carton, each of the pins I5 projects from the upper surface of the yarn package shelf I4 a greater distance than it does from the under surface of said shelf. This provides a firm engagement between the pins I5 and the bobbins I8 mounted thereon so that the loaded yarn package shelves I4 may be handled freely without fear of dropping any of the bobbins I 8, yet permits the loaded shelves to be positioned readily on the base I2 or on a layer of the bobbins I8 without special precautions for engaging the pins I5 with the apertures I6 in said base or with the bobbins in said layer.

It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is given merely by way of illustration and that many variations may be made therein without departin from the spirit of our invention.

Having described our invention, what we desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a carton for storing and shipping separate packages of yarn arranged in superposed layers, each of said packages being apertured at the top and bottom thereof, a plurality of intermediate shelves between said layers, each intermediate shelf being supported by the layer of packages beneath said intermediate shelf and supporting the layer of packages above said intermediate shelf, a bottom shelf supporting all of said layers, a pallet carrying said layers and said shelf and having a plurality of apertures therein, pins mounted in said intermediate shelves and projecting from both sides thereof, said pins engaging in the apertures of said yarn packages to prevent relative movement thereof, and pins mounted in said bottom shelf and projecting from both sides thereof, the upper portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures of the yarn packages in said bottom layers to prevent relative movement thereof and the lower portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures in said pallet to prevent relative horizontal movement of the bottom shelf and packages with respect to said pallet.

2, In a carton for storing and shipping separate packages of yarn arranged in superposed layers, each of said packages being apertured at the top and bottom thereof, a plurality of intermediate shelves between said layers, each intermediate shelf being supported by the layer of packages beneath said intermediate shelf and supporting the layer of packages above said intermediate shelf, a bottom shelf supporting all of said layers, a pallet carrying said layers and said shelf and having a plurality of apertures therein, pins mounted in said intermediate shelves and projecting from both sides thereof, said pins engaging in the apertures of said yarn packages to prevent relative movement thereof, and pins mounted in said bottom shelf and projecting from both sides thereof, the upper portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures of the yarn packages in said bottom layers to prevent relative movement thereof and the lower portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures in said pallet to prevent relative horizontal movement of the bottom shelf and packages with respect to said pallet, said pins projecting from the upper surfaces of said intermediate and bottom shelves a greater distance than from the under surfaces of said shelves.

3. In a carton for storing and shipping separate packages of yarn arranged in superposed layers, each of said packages being apertured at the top and bottom thereof, a plurality of intermediate shelves between said layers, each intermediate shelf being supported by the layer of packages beneath said intermediate shelf and supporting the layer of packages above said intermediate shelf, a bottom shelf supporting all of said layers, a pallet carrying said layers and said shelf and having a plurality of apertures therein, pins mounted in said intermediate shelves and projecting from both sides thereof, said pins engaging in the apertures of said yarn packages to prevent relative movement thereof, and pins mounted in said bottom shelf and projecting from both sides thereof, the upper portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures of the yarn packages in said bottom layers to prevent relative movement thereof and the lower portions of the latter pins engaging in the apertures in said pallet to prevent relative horizontal movement of the bottom shelf and packages with respect to said pallet, said pins projecting from the upper surfaces of said shelves a greater distance than from the under surfaces of said shelves, a cap resting on the uppermost of said layers and having a plurality of pins extending downwardly therefrom for engaging the packages of yarn, and a protective cover fitting over said layers.

WILLIAM C. STORER. A.,L. ROTRUCK.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 827,124 Speer July 31, 1906 953,828 Hahn et al Apr. 5, 1910 1,916,755 Dowdell July 4, 1933 2,031,851 Plumkett Feb. 25, 1936 2,358,160 Haack Sept. 12, 1944 2,405,535 Weiss Aug. 6, 1946 2,424,553 Conti July 29, 1947 2,489,054 Spralle Nov. 22, 1949 2,564,834 Devine et al Aug. 21, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 505,735 Great Britain May 16, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US827124 *Mar 28, 1905Jul 31, 1906Arthur R SpeerPacking-case.
US953828 *Jun 14, 1909Apr 5, 1910John N HahnBox or package.
US1916755 *Sep 2, 1931Jul 4, 1933Dowdell Ruth EStacking fixture
US2031851 *Jan 27, 1934Feb 25, 1936Moulded Pulp CorpContainer for thread bodies
US2358160 *Oct 6, 1943Sep 12, 1944Frank W HaackMigratory stabilizer for beehives
US2405535 *Aug 24, 1944Aug 6, 1946Signode Steel Strapping CoAdjustable pallet
US2424553 *Jan 5, 1944Jul 29, 1947American Viscose CorpPackage of rolls of sheet material
US2489054 *Sep 7, 1946Nov 22, 1949Nat Sugar Refining CompanyPallet
US2564834 *Nov 23, 1946Aug 21, 1951Devine James HReceptacle and cover therefor
GB505735A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2938625 *Apr 16, 1959May 31, 1960Du PontCarton for wound yarn
US3172534 *Oct 27, 1961Mar 9, 1965Mead CorpContainer for packaging yarn on spools or bobbins
US4482051 *May 26, 1982Nov 13, 1984Cantey Jr Bryant WShipping pallet
US4667823 *Jan 2, 1986May 26, 1987Ppg Industries, Inc.Pallet-type package and packaging system and trays therefore for transporting, storing and unloading bobbin yarn
US4936457 *Aug 23, 1988Jun 26, 1990E.G.O. Elektro-Gerate Blanc U. FischerHotplate stacking aid
US5678968 *Jul 3, 1995Oct 21, 1997Hexacomb CorporationHoneycomb roll spacer
US5924569 *Aug 12, 1997Jul 20, 1999Stone Container CorporationFilament tube shipping apparatus
US6033167 *Aug 6, 1998Mar 7, 2000Pactiv CorporationHoneycomb bag pad
US7546921 *Mar 30, 2007Jun 16, 2009International Paper CompanyPackaging system for shipping a plurality of items
US8955696 *Jun 7, 2013Feb 17, 2015Tina Ting-Yuan WangStorage systems for milk bags
US9279610Jan 6, 2015Mar 8, 2016Tina Ting-Yuan WangStorage systems for milk bags
US20070199845 *Apr 21, 2005Aug 30, 2007Peter HartwallTrayconcept
US20080017650 *Mar 30, 2007Jan 24, 2008Evans John APackaging system for shipping a plurality of items
US20130327734 *Jun 7, 2013Dec 12, 2013Tina Ting-Yuan WangStorage Systems for Milk Bags
USRE32530 *Mar 15, 1985Oct 27, 1987 Shipping pallet
DE1138016B *Sep 19, 1957Oct 18, 1962Edgar KlausVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Verpacken von Garn- bzw. Zwirncopsen sowie Garn-, Flach- und Zwirnspulen
EP0940346A2 *Mar 4, 1999Sep 8, 1999Fa. Karl PawelDevice for packaging objects provided with object-locating means
EP0940346A3 *Mar 4, 1999Nov 17, 1999Fa. Karl PawelDevice for packaging objects provided with object-locating means
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/386, 206/392, 206/499
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D85/676, B65D85/67, B65D71/70, B65D71/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/0096, B65D85/676, B65D2571/00037, B65D2571/00111, B65D71/70
European ClassificationB65D71/70, B65D71/00P1A