Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2662644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1953
Filing dateJul 12, 1951
Priority dateJul 12, 1951
Publication numberUS 2662644 A, US 2662644A, US-A-2662644, US2662644 A, US2662644A
InventorsAlexander Harry B
Original AssigneeSuperior Switchboard & Devices
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary stand for parts containers
US 2662644 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1953 H. B. ALEXANDER 2,662,644

ROTARY STAND FOR PARTS CONTAINERS Filed July 12, 1951 a Sheets-Sheet 1 3 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS Dec- 1 1953 H. B. ALEXANDER ,6 2

ROTARY STAND FOR PARTS CONTAINERS Filed July 12, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 l A "*s 27 F 3 INVENTOR.

[far Rfllexana'er 49 BY '1? ATTORNEYS Dec. 15, 1953 H. B. ALEXANDER ROTARY sum: FOR PARTS CONTAINERS 3 Sheets-$11961; 5

Filed July 12, 1951 I N V EN TOR. Harry Bfllex'ande? B Y ATTORNE Y-S' Patented Dec. 15, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,662,644 ROTARY swarm FOR PARTS commas Application July 12,1951, SerialNo. 236,339.:

6 Claims. 1

The invention relates generally to. a stand: for mounting a plurality of Jars. or; containers. for small parts, and more particularly to a. tiered holder which will hold a, large. number of con.- tainers in position to be rotated selectively into view-and intoa position of easy access.

The novel stand of the. present invention is designed and adapted to. hold alarge number of preferably glass. jar containers having a. variety of small parts such as nails, bolts, screws and washers for industrial or 1101118; use, and to; hold suchcontainers so that the usercan, inspect quickly all of the containers and select and remove. the one desired.

Certain prior containerstands. have.- ,had flanged trays or decks for supporting; the con.- t-ainers and cooperating walls or surfaces on. he rim flanges and, av central collar to maintain; the individual containers in position on the trays. These, stands have been relatively expensive; to construct because either the outer rim, of the tray must be polygonal or the central collar must be; scalloped or indented in order to provide the necessary abutments for positioning the individual trays.

Moreover, when such trays are rotated or spun rapidly the containers are apt to be thrown outward by centrifugal force and either tipped over or dislodged from the trays. Likewise, if such stands are used on. shipboard the containers tend to become tipped or dislodged as the ship rolls...

Another disadvantage with these prior container stands is that they use jars which have caps to keep dust and dirt from the parts stored therein, and when a jar is removed from the stand the user has to, unscrew or otherwise re; move the cap, take outthe desired part, and then replace the cap on the jar before. returning it to its proper place on the stand,

It, is an object of the present invention to overcome the foregoing disadvantages and generally improve the construction of a rotary stand for parts containers.

More specifically, it is an object to provide a novel container stand which will, more securely hold the individual containers in position to prevent their dislodgment if the stand is spun ap y or is. t pped. or toss d. about as on sh pboard. Another object is to. provide. av novel. rotary stand which is adapted for holding aplurality of jars. in position without requiring individual covers on. th j s. so that the. handlingv orthe cover is eliminated when the. jar isrein cdtllom the stand. tor taking out or meaning parts therein.

A. further object is to: provide a novel stand havin av tier. .1; rotatab e decks adapted for mounting a plurality-of; openja-rs in such manner that the decks. act. as closures for the jars when monoted:-v

A still further object: to provide a novel and improved: ro ary-stand which. is extremely simple and. inexpensive to, construct, andeasy and effective-to. se.

These; and other objects are accomplished by the parts, constructions, arrangements and combinations, comprising the present invention, preterred. embodiments of which are shown in the accompanying drawings and described in the specification as exemplifying the best known mode, of; carrying out the invention, the nature of; the invention being set forth in the following general tatement, and the scope of the invention being defined: in the, appended claims.

In general terms; the. invention may be stated as comprising a standhaving a plurality of decks tiered one above. the other on a base and spaced apart vertically to allow insertion and removal of jars between. the decks, the decks being rotatable in h rizontal planes. and the undersides of the decks being conical and having downwardly extending inturned flanges for engaging under the flanged top ends of. the.- jars for holding the upper ends?- of said jars: against the undersides of said deck Referringto the drawings forming part hereof, in which preferred embodiments of the invention are shown byway of example,

Figure 1 is a. vertical sectional view through a stand embodying the invention and having three superposed decks, some, of the, jars being shown in. elevation;

Fig. 2 is: a, bottom plan sectional view as on in 2. -2. Fig- 1;:

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view as on line 3-3, Fig. 2;

, Fig. 4 is a. fragmentary bottom plan sectional viewsimilar to 2 of a modified form of the invention;

Fig, 5. is a fragmentary elevational view as on line 5 -5. Fla 4.;

Fig. 6 is. a, fragmentary bottom plan sectional view similar to. Fig. 2, of another modified form or the invention; and

Fig. 7 is. a fragmentary sectional view as on line --1.F

Si lar numerals reier to similar pa s throughoutthedrawings,

The stand shown inli'ig, 1 includes three decks tieredor superposed. one; above the. ot e and the decks: are spaced.- apa t diffe e y for mountmaterial and the jars may also be made of a preferably transparent plastic material.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2; the improved stand preferably includes a circular base, III which may have radially extending reinforcing ribs II and a central boss I2. Preferably a shaft or column I3 is screwed at its lower end into the boss I2 and extends upwardly therefrom. The column I3 forms a central shaft around which the several decks indicated at I4 are rotatably mounted.

On top of the central portion of the base It is a bearing plate ID on which a ball bearing I6 is rollably supported, and an upper bearing plate I! rests on the ball bearing I6 for taking the thrust of the superposed decks I4. Each deck assembly I4 consists of a flat circular plate I which has a central aperture I8 fitting around the column I3, and a frusto-conical plate I9 of thin resilient metal below the plate I4 and secured to the outer edge thereof. Preferably the plate I9 is flanged over the outer edge of the plate I5 as indicated at 20.

Each frusto-conical plate I9 is preferably formed at its central portion with a downturned cylindrical flange 2I which is preferably spaced radially outward of the column I3. A cylindrical collar is fitted around the cylindrical flange 2I and the upper end of the collar overlaps and tightly fits the flange. The collars act as the spacers between the decks, and as shown in Fig. 1 they may have different lengths as indicated at 22a, 22b and 22c for accommodating different sizes of jars. Preferably the bottom end of each collar 22 overlaps the cylindrical flange 23 of an annular member having a horizontal annular flange 24 which rests on the bearing plate of the next deck below. The annular member at the bottom of collar 22c rests on the top bearing plate I1, and the annular members at the bottoms of the collars 22b and 22a rest on similar plates I1 which bear on tops of the decks below. Thus, all of the decks M are rotatable as a unit about the column I3 on the bearing I6.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 each of the decks I4 is adapted to mount six jars arranged circumferentially of the deck. The lower deck may mount relatively large jars, the middle deck may mount smaller size jars and the upper deck may mount still smaller size jars, although the number of jars and the arrangement as to sizes may be varied as desired. As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the jars 25a, 25b and 250 differ only as to size, and each has a cylindrical wall with an open top formed within a radially projecting rim flange or bead 26. The jars on each deck are adapted .26 and position each jar 25.

circumferentially arranged flanges 21 which extend downwardly from the plate I 9 and have in turned lips 29 at their bottom ends for engaging under the rim flanges 26 of the jars, as best shown in Fig. 2 and 3. An inner abutment flange 29 is preferably struck downwardly from the plate I9 between each pair of flanges 2! and spaced inwardly thereof to abut the rim flange If desired, the flanges 29 and 21 may be punched or struck out of the metal of the plates I9 as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, or the flanges may be separate pieces welded to the plate I9.

' tightly against the undersurface of the frustoconical plates I9. Due to the conical curvature or crown of the plates I9, the portion thereof which abuts each rim flange 29 will not be entirely flat,'but the thin metal of the plate I9 has suflicient spring or resiliency to allow the plate to be pressed into substantially flat condition as the rim flange 26 is inserted above the lips 28 of the flanges 21. Accordingly, each jar 29, when forced into position against the abutment flange 29 with the lips 28 engaging under the bead 26 of the jar, will be resiliently held in position so that any centrifugal force tending to throw the jars outwardly will have to overcome both the upward incline of the plate I9 and the resilient gripping of the flange 26 before the jars are dis lodged.

In the operation of the improved stand, the user rotates the deck or decks I4 until he sees that the desired jar is in a position of easy access, and then he grips the desired jar and pulls radially outward with sufficient force to overcome the resilient contact of the rim flange between the frusto-conical plate I9 and the lips to be held against the undersurface of the frusto- The jars are supported or hung from:the plate I9 by means of pairs of diametrically opp 28 of the hanger flanges 21. After the jar has been thus removed, the user may continue to hold it in one hand while he either dumps out the required part into the other hand or extracts the part with the fingers of said other hand. While still holding the jar in the one hand and the extracted part in the other, he pushes the jar into position between hanger flanges 27 with the rim flange 26 of the jar above the lips 23, and presses radially inward with suflicient force to overcome the yielding resistance of the sheet metal plate I9 due to its conical curvature. Thus the user never has to unscrew or remove a lid from the jar, then put the lid down while extracting the desired part, and then put the part down while applying the lid back onto the jar.

The modified construction of Figs. 4 and 5 includes the same central column I3, cylindrical collars 22 and frusto-conical plates I9, each with its outer rim flanged at 20 over a flat top plate. In this embodiment the abutment flanges 29 may be welded to the underside of plate I9, and the hanger flanges 21' with inturned lips 28 are formed on substantially triangular hanger members 39 which may be spot welded to the plate I9 between the jar positions. Preferably, a spring wire retaining clip 3I is fastened to each triangular member 30 as by a screw or rivet 32, and the ends of the clip are formed to normally yield- .ingly engage the rim flange 26 of each jar on op- .posite sides thereof. Accordingly, in order to remove a jar from its position, the user has to exert sufficient outward force to overcome the resistance of the spring clips as well as the resiliency of "the conical plate pressing against fth e lip flanges 28'.

Inthe modified form shown in Figs. d'and 7, the flanges 21 with their inturned. lips 2B and the abutment flanges 29 may be formed by being struck downwardly from the; plates I!) as in the embodiment of Figs. 1, 2 and 3, and the decks are rotatably mounted on the column l3 and spaced apart by the cylindrical collars 22. Likewise, the rim flanges 26 of the jars are forced between the plate [9 and the lips 23 so-as to slightly spring the metal of the plate 19 and resiliently holdthe jars in position. In addition, a spring clip 34 is provided to resiliently engage the outer edge of each jar, and each clip 34 is secured as by spot welding to the upper surface of the plate l9 and has a rounded nib portion 35 which extends through a slot 35a in the plate I 9 and resiliently engages the outer edge of the rim flange 26, when the jar is in position between the hanger flanges 21.

The improved construction is economical because it can be formed substantially entirely of sheet metal, and the method of forming and assembling the several trays using the straight cylindrical collars 22 as spacers is inexpensive both. from the standpoint of labor and materials. Moreover, the jars are always resiliently held in place to prevent their accidental or unintended dislodgment by centrifugal force, or tilting of the stand, or for any other reason.

An important advantage in using the present improved tray lies in the fact that the operator never has to handle or manipulate a separate lid or cover for the individual jars, which leaves him with one hand to hold the jar and the other to extract the desired part. There is thus no possibility of individual lids becoming lost 01' misplaced during use.

In the foregoing description, certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness and um derstanding, but no unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirements of the prior art, because such words are used for descriptive purposes herein and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the embodiments of the improved construction illustrated and described herein are by way of example, and the scope of the present invention is not limited to the exact details of construction.

Having now described the invention, the construction, the operation and use of preferred embodiments thereof, and the advantageous new and useful results obtained thereby; the new and useful constructions, and reasonable mechanical equivalents thereof obvious to those skilled in the art, are set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A rotary stand for a plurality of circumferentially arranged flanged containers including a base, a column fixed to and extending vertically from said base, a plurality of decks spaced one above another on said column and rotatably supported on said base, each deck having a frusto-conical resilient lower plate sloping inwardly downward, spaced pairs of oircumferentially spaced container hanger flanges extending downwardly and inwardly from said lower plate, the flanges in each pair being extended toward each other and adapted to engage under the flange of a container to hold the same tightly against said undersurface, and a container stop means abutting the radially inner side of said container located between said hanger flanges at a point on said plate inwardly thereof.

2. A rotary stand for a plurality of flanged containers including a base, a column fixed to "E8 and extending vertically from: said: base; a p11:- ralityof decks. spaced :one above another on said column and rotatably' supported onsaidbase,

pairs of circumferentially spaced hanger flanges extending downwardly from each deck, each pair having inturned lips adapted to engage under a container flange to hold the same tightly against the undersurface of said deck, means yieldingly restraining radially outward movement of a container engaged insaid flanges, and means associated with each pai'rof hanger flanges for limiting inward movement of a container supported in said pair of flanges.

3. A rotary stand for a plurality of flanged containers including a base, a column fixed to and extending vertically from said base, a plurality of decks spaced one above the other on said column and rotatably supported on the base, each deck including a flat upper plate and a frustoconical resilient lower plate secured thereto, said lower plate sloping inwardly downward toward a central portion, a cylindrical collar depending from each said central portion and spacing the decks apart vertically, and circumferentially spaced hanger flanges depending from said lower plate, each pair of hanger flanges having inturned lips adapted to engage under the flange of a container to press the same against the lower plate.

4. A rotary stand for a plurality of flanged containers including a base, a column fixed to and extending vertically from said base, a plurality of decks spaced one above the other on said column and rotatably supported on the base, each deck including a flat upper plate and a frusto-conical resilient lower plate secured thereto, said lower plate sloping inwardly downward toward a central portion, a cylindrical collar depending from and secured to each said central portion and spacing the decks apart vertically, and circumferentially spaced hanger flanges depending from said lower plate, each pair of hanger flanges having inturned lips adapted to engage under a container flange to press the same against the lower plate, and abutment flanges on said lower plate, and said abutment flanges being associated with each pair of hanger flanges for limiting inward movement of a container supported in said pair of flanges.

5. A rotary stand for a plurality of circumferentially arranged flanged containers including a base, a column fixed to and extending vertically from said base, a plurality of decks spaced one above the other on said column and rotatably supported on said base, hanger members secured to the underside of each deck and located in circumferentially spaced relationship thereabout, each hanger member having angular lip flanges adapted to engage under the flanges of containers, supported on each side thereof, and a spring wire clip on each hanger member extending in front of adjacent pairs of said hanger members for yieldingly restraining radial outward movement of contains supported thereby.

6. A rotary stand for a plurality of circumferentially arranged flanged containers comprising, a base, a column fixed to and extending vertically from said base, a plurality of decks spaced one above the other on said column and rotatably supported on said base, triangular hanger members secured in equally and circumferentially spaced relationship about the underside of each deck, each hanger member having angular lip flanges formed outwardly on two converging sides of the hanger adapted to engage the flanges of containers supported one on each side thereof in cooperation with those hanger members located on either side thereof, and a spring wire clip on each hanger member extending for a spaced distance toward those hanger members on either side thereof for yieldingly restraining radial outward movement of containers supported on either side thereof.

HARRY B. ALEXANDER.

8 References Cited in the me of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date McKee May 22, 1883 Anderson Dec. 8, 1908 Glass, Sr. Apr. 8, 1930 Lundy et a1 June 3, 1930 Stein May 16, 1933 Shapiro June 19, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US278161 *Nov 17, 1882May 22, 1883 Rack for graduated glass measures
US905975 *Aug 17, 1908Dec 8, 1908Henry W AndersonRevolving cabinet.
US1754094 *Aug 4, 1925Apr 8, 1930Glass Sr GeorgeSelf-serving tray
US1761218 *Apr 18, 1927Jun 3, 1930Hull Samuel PJar holder
US1908928 *Jun 17, 1932May 16, 1933Max SteinRevolving display rack
US2557801 *Dec 8, 1947Jun 19, 1951Joseph ShapiroUnder shelf attachment for containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2971651 *Apr 30, 1959Feb 14, 1961Fogarty Mfg CompanyTable
US3417873 *May 18, 1966Dec 24, 1968Samuel LeptroneFood dispensing rack
US3762362 *Sep 1, 1971Oct 2, 1973Lipshaw JAutomatic tissue processor
US3805965 *May 4, 1972Apr 23, 1974Champagne AStorage unit
US4848856 *Mar 10, 1988Jul 18, 1989Dyment LimitedArticle display apparatuses and elongated, deflectable racks
US6802481 *May 14, 2002Oct 12, 2004Kenneth T NewburnSpinning multiple container containment rack
US8887930 *Aug 24, 2012Nov 18, 2014Mark A. KrullOrganizational storage system
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/77, 211/131.1
International ClassificationB25H3/00, A47F5/02, A47F5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/0037, A47F5/02, B25H3/00
European ClassificationA47F5/02, A47F5/00C1B, B25H3/00