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Publication numberUS2663298 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1953
Filing dateJun 16, 1950
Priority dateJun 16, 1950
Publication numberUS 2663298 A, US 2663298A, US-A-2663298, US2663298 A, US2663298A
InventorsRose Hilton W
Original AssigneeRose Hilton W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for administering parenteral solutions
US 2663298 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1953 H. w. ROSE 2,663,298

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ADMINISTERING PARENTERAL SOLUTIONS Filed June 16, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l FIG. 1

IN VEN TOR.

H. W. ROSE Dec. 22, 1953 2,663,298

H. W. ROSE APPARATUS AND METHOD 'FOR ADMINISTERING PARENTERAL. SOLUTIONS Flled June 16, L950 3 SheetsSheet 2 F errr- 1. 'IIIIIIIIIIIIII. will/1 fI/III/JI I N VEN TOR.

H. w ROSE Dec. 22, 1953 H. w. ROSE 2,663,298 APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ADMINISTERING PARENTERAL SOLUTIONS Filed June 16, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN VEN TOR.

. H; w. ROSE i-W ,6 e;

ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 22, 1953 APPARATUS; AND METHOD FOR .ADMINISQ f TERINQRARENTERALSQLUTIONS Rose, Arlington, Va."

- Application rum; 16, 1950, Serial No. 168,431

l l, 1 fThis invention relates to an apparatus and a method for administering parenteral solutions and more particularly to a novel container for the'storage of blood derivatives, such as dried plasma and the like, and bloodsubstitutes, such as dextran and similar compounds, which may thusbe packaged and ithereafter dispensed from the container withoutpossibility of contactwith the air or contamination. 7

Present day imethodsiof storage and shipment oi the blood derivatives and substitutes with which we are here; concerned are particularly llll b r m h s es ia l t ue n. c ection with the furnishing of supplies of plasma for use under emergency conditions as, for example, by our armed forces,-the approved method being costly,-complicated and diflicult to set up, including relatively heavy or weighty apparatus, and requiring an overall time interval for administration that is considered unduly prolonged.

The method currently employed contemplates the storage of dried human plasma and distilled water in separate glass bottles, each bottle being sealed by a penetrable, plastic closure member manufactured from sheet material such as rubher. The bottles must be separately and carefully packed, to minimize possibility of breakage, and a package or kit is provided including a pair of needles, tubing, filter, observation tube, and intravenous needle. Distilled water and dried plasma are bottled under vacuum and, after the bottle closures are carefully cleansed with alcohol or the like, a double ended needle is inserted into the opposed closures, a so-called airway assembly being also employed, to permit the distilled water to be drawn into the plasma bottle. During this stepof the process it isnecessary to hold the bottles in substantially upright position with the water bottle immediately above the plasma bottle. Evenwith the exercise of extreme care plasma and water are subject to con tamination either during the step of puncturing the closures or by reason of vacuum having been partially or wholly lost., l.

The needles are then removed from the closure of the plasma bottle which is then gently agitated until the plasma is completely dissolved.

, The needle of the airway assembly is then removed from the water bottle and inserted through the closure of the: plasma bottle which must then be suspended in inverted, upright position for 'administration' "of the transfusion. A second needle is inserted into the closure of the plasma bottle and this secondn'eedl'e carries a discharge tube, including'a plasma filter'and rea i s; (o1.12s2141)" observation tube, having an intravenous needle on the extremity thereofl Not only are these preliminary s eps time consumingb'ut a support is required for; maintain-- h Pl m bottle n u ri t p si om uri the interval required for administration ofthe transfusion. r 4

Moreover, the expenseof packaging is relatively g t sb t e: heavy-and; rea i y frangible as well as costly, addinglfurtherjtothe cost and presenting problems of either disposition after use or storage and eventual shipment if. salvage is contemplated. "1);". f' It is accordingly H a I major purpose ofthe' present inventiontoprovide a novel and distinetly improved methodof packaging and; shipment ;of blood derivatives and blood substitutes, wherein all of the objectionable features detailed hereabove have beeneliminated. r

It is afurther object of the present invention to provide a novel and distinctlyimproved methodof packaging and s'hipment'otdried, human plasma wherein all ofthe foregoing; difficulties of restorationof plas a and; a'dministr ionof transfusion are eliminated. r I

It is a furthenobject of the present inven ion to ,provide a novel, sterile .container for dried plasma and for the; distilled'--water required 'for the restoration thereof which; may be readily manufactured from inexpensive 'material ofzia character that may be conveniently disposed of after use. i f

It is a furtherobject of the present invention to provide a 'novel'container for dried plasma; and for the distilled waterrequired for the restoration thereof, which will" be flexible 'an'dinot readily frangible, substantially eliminating breakage and handling problems duringthe; shipment thereof- 1; I J ,f if .Z'ii l It is a further object of the present; invention to providea novel container of the class set-forth which is especially conformed so :as to house separately dried plasma. and the distilled water required for the restoration thereof; I a novel clampingmember'being provided tofpreve'nt'coim mingling of plasma and water. I It is :a further object-of the invention: to- 'pro videa novel container of the class setforthihav ing a discharge tube and intravenousne'edle' permanently attached thereto, the needle being protected against; damage, and ,contamination; "so that {no contamination of restored plasma, orloss of tim r; (may occur through any necessity for attaichinga'tube to the container to permit the use thereof as a dispenser during administration of the contents.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a novel package of particularly economical construction, for a container of the class set forth, to permit the ready handling and shipment thereof with little possibility of damage to container and contents.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a novel method for commingling the contents of a container of the class set forth.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide a novel method for administering intravenously the restored contents of a container of the class set forth without any necessity for suspending the container during the transfusion interval.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a novel container of the class set forth which may be manufactured with particular economy, comprising a simple structure which may be used with especial convenience and requires no additional appliances to permit the use thereof as a dispenser or during the administration of the contents intravenously.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a novel blood plasma container, constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2, a vertical sectional view through the container of Fig. l, a portion of the discharge tube being broken away, illustrating the first step in the filling thereof, a measured quantity of distilled water having been placed in the lower portion of the container;

Fig. 3, a vertical sectional view through the container, a portion of the discharge tube being broken away, illustrating the second step of the filling process, air having been evacuated from the lower portion of the container and a clamp having been applied to the neck portion of the container, immediately above the filled, lower portion;

Fig. 4, a vertical sectional view through the container, a portion of the discharge tube being broken away, illustrating the third step of the filling process, a measured quantity of dried blood plasma or other blood derivative or substitute having been placed in the upper portion of the container;

Fig. 5, a fragmentary, vertical sectional view through the container, illustrating the fourth I step of the filling process, air having been evacuated from the upper portion of the container and the mouth thereof having been scaled;

Fig. 6, a horizontal sectional view through the lower portion of the container, taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 7, a longitudinal sectional view through the filled container, illustrating a novel manner in which the container may be packaged for shipment;

Fig. 8, a perspective view illustrating the container in position ready for use, a portion of the discharge tube being broken away, the clamp on the neck portion having been removed and the dried blood plasma and distilled water having been combined;

Fig. 9, a perspective view of a preferred form of clamp used for effecting a seal between the upper and lower portions of the container;

Fig. 10, a longitudinal detail sectional view through the clamp and the adjacent portions of the container, illustrating the clamp broken, prior to effecting the removal thereof;

Fig. 11, a longitudinal sectional view through the broken clamp and associated parts disclosed in Fig. 10, illustrating the method for removal of clamp and .tie member;

Fig. 12, an elevational View of the intravenous needle and novel protective cover applied to the extremity of the discharge tube;

Fig. 13, a vertical sectional view taken through the intravenous needle, the protective cover having been removed;

Fig. 14, a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through the neck and upper portions of the container, illustrating a modified form of strainer element;

Fig. 15, a perspective view of a modified form of clamp, illustrating the component parts thereof in expanded position; and

Fig. 16, a longitudinal sectional view through the modified clamp of Fig. 15, illustrating the clamp applied to the neck portion of the container.

As illustratedmore particularly in Fig. 1 of the drawings, the novel container It comprises upper and lower portions II and i2, respectively, and an intermediate connecting or neck portion 13 of substantially reduced width. The bottom it of the lower portion is closed and has a discharge tube 26 mounted centrally thereof, as will be hereinafter more fully described. The upper extremity of the top portion H is open to provide a mouth whereby the bag-like container may be filled with distilled water and dried blood plasma.

Preferably, the container H] is formed from suitable plastic, sheet material, it having been found in practice that sheet material n1anufaetured from polyethylene and/or polyvinyl deriva tives is particularly desirable, combining the advantageous characteristics of tensile strength, flexibility, resiliency, and transparency. Further, no vulcanization takes place when layers of such material are maintained under pressure, an essential issue in connection with the instant device. In the preferred embodiment of the in vention illustrated a single sheet of such material has been bent upon itself as indicated at it to provide superimposed layers of plastic material, the sides of which have been preformed to comprise upper and lower portions H and i2, respectively, connected by a restricted neck portion 1 2. One layer of such material extends beyond the open mouth of the container, as indicated at 15, to provide means for appropriately sealing such. mouth. The side edges I6 of the container are permanently united as indicated, as will be more readily apparent from an examination of Figs. 1 and 6 of the drawings, by cementing or other related step as is well known in connection with plastic materials of the class with which we are here concerned. There has thus been provided a relatively tough, resilient and flexible container including spaced upper and lower bag-like portions designed for use as separate receptacles and connected by a tubular, restricted neck.

The lower portion 12 is intended to receive a measured quantity of distilled water while the upper portion I l serves as the receptacle for the dried blood plasma and suitable sealing means is provided for maintaining the contents of these portions separate and preventing the inadvertent commingling thereof until it is desired to restore the plasma for transfusion or other puredge.

acemes poses. Thus the upper and lowerportions ofthe tenamer comprise, in effect, p te-"r epcomprises a generally U'-sh aped Supporting and I spacing member I! including a substantially verticallydisposed end wall l 8 and outwardly flaring legs l9. These legs are spaced farthest-apart at'th'eir extremities Zfiwhich may be sharply, outwardly inclined and provided with a rounded Arcuate portions 2| join the end'wall l8 and the legs 19, the over-all'height of the end wall being preferably greater than the distance between the inner extremities of the legs. 1 Prefierably the legs 19 are formed with opposed arcuate' transverse cross-sectional configurations,

for a purpose which will hereafter become more fully apparent.

" It will be obvious that'the filling steps maybe reversed, i. e., dried plasma may be placed in the lower portion [2 and distilled water in the upper portion 1 l, without in any manner affecting the functioning of the apparatus. By such an arrangement any necessity for a drying step, subsequent to the introduction ofLliquid-and prior lies the end wall and legs of the clamp, in parallel relation with respect thereto, and the upper and lower portions or receptaclesl! and 12, extend immediately beyond the extremities?!) of the legs of the clamp. It willbe observed that the configuration of the clamp is such that no sharp surfaces are presented for contact with thermaterial of the container, such as'might result in vulcanization of the'plastic material orininjury thereto. A suitable tie: member is then posi tioned about the restricted neck portion of the container, in embracing relationship with respect to the clamping member. Various forms of tie members may be employed, a preferred embodiment comprising an adhesive member 22 intended to be wrapped around the'legs I9 and overlying neck portion, the inner extremity of such a tie member being free, from'adhesive so as. not to adhesively unite with the material of the container. Thus the first layer or two of the .tie member 22 will not adhere to the restricted neck portion whilethe outer layers'of such member will adhere to the lower layers thereof, obviating any possibility of passage of either distilled'v /ater or dried plasma from one portion of the container to the other during such time as the neck portion I3 is engaged with the clamping member 11. The arcuate portions, 2| of the clamp and the angularly directed extremities 23 of the legs thereof effectively prevent any possibilityof in-' advertent displacement of the tie member 22.

As will be more readily apparent from an examination of Figs. and ll of the drawings, the outer extremity 22 of the tie member 22 is also free of adhesive and comprises aconvenient tab which maybe grasped and makes the task of manually removing or unwrapping the tie memberfrom the clamp IT a particularly simple one. It is contemplated, however, that this'clamp will be readily frangible whereby fracture" thereof, as will be more fully described hereinafter, results in practically instantaneousseparation of tie member and clamp from the restricted portion l3 of the container.

Preferably the clamping member ll'is'formed from a suitable plastic material which will be readily frangible so that,' when it "is' desired to remove theclamp; pressure" upon the 'ei ztren'riities of theilegs' Will -result in fracture of the end wall' l'il; as is particularlyillustrated in Figs. 10

and 11 of -"the drawings;- 'TheT collapse of this end wall, occasioned=by s'uchiracture, will permit the lateralwithdrawaliof'the tie member '22 as the pieces of th"'clariiping "member fall from place,

freeingithe neckportionof r the container;

modified form of? clamping member has been "illustrated :in-I'Figsk :15 and 16 of the drawings. In' this embodiment theclamp comprises an inner :U-shaped member:'23 of arcuate cross sectional' conformation: provided 1 with upstanding rounded ribs' 24pn the' ends' thereof. Preferably the" distance betweensu'ch' ribs is but slightly greater than the width of the restricted neck portion I 3' 'ofzthe; container. An outer, complementarily arcuat'e' and: resilient clamping member 25 is provided, for engagement with the surface of inner member 23:.between the ribs 24. In use-,"thefrestricted necks-portion of the container is placed'up'ontheiinner member 23 in overlying relationship and the outer clamping memberl2 5 is snapped thereupon;""'Firm pressure is thus obtained, efie'ctively' preventing passage of contents between the upper and lower portions of the container until theclampingm'embers thus described are manually. removed" a Any rsuitable plastic or other material; :having ..:the required degree of flexibility, may be utilizedrfor the manufacture of the clamping members-:23rand 25, and, since no fracture thereof isint'ended' connection with disengagement fromtliec'ontainer, such members aresusceptible ofreuser The lower portion orreceptacle 12 preferably is provided 'witha discharge or'injectiontube 26. The bottom wallof the receptacle 12 maybe provided with an' aperture 21,? positioned substantially centrally" thereof; and the inner extremity of the tube is inserted=through thisaperture. A flange 28 is provided 'on- 'the" inner extremity of the'tubel 26 and "this "flange is cemented or otherwise united to the 'material'of' the container immediately surrounding the aperture-'21. Preferably the flange 28 includesa suitable strainer element-29 provided-with'a plurality of extreme- 1y small apertures which will permit the passage of fluidtherethrough but which will effectively 'prevent possibility of any particles or clumps of dried'plasma entering into the-discharge tube.

'A-clamping member-30 is: applied to the discharge tube 26immediately adjacent the receptacle l2*to' prevent'any distilled water from entering any substantial-distance into the tube prior totheuse of the device' for administering transfusion. If desired, this clamping member may i be similar to the'clamping' member H, ex cept on a materially smaller scale, and a tie member 3|, 'similarto theltie member 22, may be. used. It .has been found in practice that when clamping members-of this character, are employed there is far'less likelihood "of deformation "of thei'materiali' clamped thereupon despite comparatively long stora'ge intervals.

' Thedischarge' tubezZB is provided on the lower extremityi'thereof*witli an intravenous needle 32 as is well known in this art..--'Preferably. the intravenous needleiincludes an enlarged engaging' portion33 receivable within the tube 26 and including a-shoulder34"limiting entry into the tube: .To protect the needle against contamination a plastidorother suitable casing 35 is provided,..the"op en'inner extremity. of such casing being designed for-frictional engagement with the 1discha'rgetube. 26; immediately :adjacent the lower extremity thereof. The tube 26 is further provided, intermediate the extremities thereof, with a plasma filter 36 of-conventional constructions, also as is well known in the art.

The discharge tube 26 is further provided with a secondary clamping member 44 positioned adiacent the lower extremity of the tube, for a purpose to be more fully discussed hereinafter. Preferably this secondary clamp comprises a substantially rectangular plate-like body provided With'a substantially V-shaped aperture 45 positioned centrally thereof. The width of the widened extremity of this aperture is such that the discharge tube is freely receivable therein; movement of the member 44 transversely of the discharge tube will 'constrict the tube between the converging walls. of the aperture 45, thus effectively preventing flow of fluid through the discharge tube.

There has been illustrated in Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5, the progressive steps of the filling of the novel container described hereabove. With particular reference to Fig. 2, the clamping member 30 is first applied to the discharge tube 26 and a measured quantity of distilled water W is placed in the lower receptacle [2, the clamp 30 effectively preventing water from entering into the tube 26 a sufiicient distance to. reach the plasma filter 36. Preferably the receptacle [2 if of a sufficient size to conveniently receive 600 cc. of distilled water, accepted practices dictating that such water be pyrogen-free, sterile, and contain 0.1% of citric acid. The level of distilled water approaches the lower extremity of the reduced neck portion l3 of the container and air is then exhausted from the receptacle I2, above the level of distilled water, and the clamping member [1 is then applied to said reduced or restricted neck portion. This step of the filling process is illustrated in Fig. 3 of the drawings.

After drying, the upper portion of the container or receptacle II is then filled with dried, human plasma indicated conventionally at P. Preferably the size of this receptacle is such as to conveniently receive 500 cc. of plasma, accepted practices indicating the requirement for a suitable and adequate preservative such, for example, as phenylmercuric borate in the proportion of 1:50,000. Air is then exhausted from above the level of plasma and the mouth of the container is then securely sealed. Such sealing is accomplished by bending the material l5 of one wall of the mouth of the container over upon the material of the opposed mouth wall and cementing or otherwise permanently uniting the layers of material as indicated at 31, particular reference being had to Fig. 5 of the drawings. The nature of the plastic material from which the container is fabricated is such as to readily lend itself to such a permanent seal. Preferably, a suitable eyelet or grommet 38 is placed through the united layers of material 31, substantially centrally of the width of the closed mouth of the device to permit the subsequent hanging thereof upon a hook, nail or the like, should disposition be desirable during administration of the restored fluid.

The novel receptacle having thus been filled, packaging for storage or shipment becomes a particularly simple matter, all issues of careful handling required for prior art devices by reason of frangibility having been eliminated.

A preferred method of packaging has been illustrated in Fig. '7 of the drawings where there is disclosed, somewhat diagrammatically, a boxlike container 39 of any suitable material such as cardboard, fibreboard, or the like, provided with a substantially U-shaped supporting spacer t0, the opposed legs of which are provided with vertically aligned apertures 4i intended to receive the bellied surfaces of the filled receptacles IR and I2. Preferably the spacer 40 is positioned Within the container 39 and the Water-filled receptacle I2 is positioned upon the lowermost leg of the spacer so as to be supported within the aperture 4|. The upper leg of the spacer is then positioned upon the upper surface of the receptacle I2 and the plasma-filled receptacle H is positioned so as to be supported within the corresponding aperture 4! in said upper leg. Advantageously the upper leg is cut away or slightly shorter than the lower leg, to conveniently accommodate and support the clamping member l7 and the reduced neck portion of the device, and is also provided with suitable cut-away portions (not shown) to permit the free storage of the convolutions of the discharge tube 28. Obviously the receptacles i l and i2 will tend to conform to the surfaces upon which they are supported, within the limits of flexibility of the plastic material from which the container is manufactured. The package thus described may be manufactured with particular economy, securely supports the container therein against lateral displacement and eliminates any requirement for excessive care in handling and shipment. Such a package may be dropped from the air, and parachuted into inaccessible areas, with substantial assurance that no damage to contents will occur.

In practice, when it is desired to restore the dried plasma for transfusion or other purposes, the clamp I1 is fractured and the tie member 22 removed from the neck portion it. The receptacles l l and 12 are then gently agitated or manipulated until the dried plasma is completely dissolved, free passage of fluid between the receptacles being had by reason of the tubular neck portion.

Upon completion of the restoration of the plasma, the clamp 30 is removed from the discharge tube 28, the cap or casing 35 is removed from the intravenous needle 32, and sufficient restored blood derivative or substitute, as the case may be, is permitted to pass through the discharge tube to vent all air therein, The tube 25 is then compressed, within the V-slot or aperture 45 of the secondary clamp 34, to shut off the flow of fluid, and the intravenous needle 32 is inserted into the patient. The tube is then released from constriction within the secondary clamp and the transfusion may be administered Without loss of time. If desired, the device may be suspended utilizing the grommet 33; however, it has been found that such suspension is neither necessary nor particularly advantageous, another method comprising folding the empty upper receptacle or portion ll about the filled lower receptacle i2 and inserting or positioning thedevice beneath the buttocks or other anatomical portion of the patient. Such practice is especially sound under conditions of extreme sanguination or where the patient is suffering from circulatory depression, or the like, where it is necessary to complete the transfusion with unusual rapidity.

It Will be readily understood that, with the novel device described herein, there is no possibility of contamination of contents by air or outside influence and that the only time consuming portion of the procedure, other than that required for the transfusion per se, is that required 9 for restoration of the plasma, a task made par-. ticularly simple byreason of the flexibility of the material-from which thecontainer is manufactured which lends itself with especial ease to manual manipulation.

,'Ifhere has beenillustrated in Fig. 1% of the drawingsa modifled form of strainer element 42, which maybe substituted for the strainer 251-01 used in addition thereto. The function of these strainers is to insure that no particles of dried plasma may enter into the'dischargetube 26 to either clog the filter or affect the rate of delivery of fluid through the tube. In this modified'form of strainer, a substantially cup-shaped member is cemented or otherwise-secured in place at the lower extremity of the upper receptacle Hand immediately adj acent, the reduced ,neck portion of the device. This strainer is'provided with a plurality of particularly small apertures; 43 which will freely admit of the passage of distilled water from the receptacle, 12- to the receptacle I I i but will effectively prevent particles or clumps of undissolved dried; plasma from passing therethrough. Moreover, the nature of the plastic material from. which thedevice is formed is such that pressureupon, the receptacle I2, during the manipulation thereof, incidental to the restoring of the plasma, will force distilled water from one receptacle to the' other,- effectively assisting the rate-of restoration.

It will be-obviousto thoseskilled in this art that air is not admitted to the apparatus during the intravenous administration of the contents, the collapsiblenature of the receptacle eliminat ing any necessity forthe utilization of air to replace fluid during the-dispensing thereof. Further}. since plastics of the character with which we are here concerned may be" either largely transparent or translucent, as desired, passage of fluid from the receptacle is susceptible of visual The novel apparatus of the present invention is particularly light in weight and occupies a minimum of space. It may be readily packaged without requiring special cushioning of any sort and thus eliminates transportation problems. During use, as well as during restoration of the plasma, no changes in the relationship of the parts are required since it is, essentially, an integral structure. It is fully susceptible of efficient operation without requiring additional equipment of any character, and reduces the time required for preparation, prior to transfusion, a major extent.

Further, the novel method of administration, utilizing the body of the patient as a weight or anchor, advantageously decreases the time required for transfusion, an element of particular importance often times in direct ratio to the oritical condition of the patient.

It will be obvious to those skilled in this art that various changes may be made in the invention'without departing from the spirit and scope thereof and therefore the invention is not limited by that which is illustrated in the drawing and described in the specification but only as is indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: a

1. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongated flexible container formed from a single sheet of transparent plastic material doubled upon itself to provide a closed bottom and an open mouth, one wall of said mouth extending beyond the other to provide an overlapping extremity for sealing said mouth,

suspension means connected with. said. overlap..-.

ping sealed portion; the'longitudinal edges of said container being united, said container havinga. reduced. central portion providing communica-- thedispensing of restored plasma from said ap paratus clamping means on said discharge tube to prevent entry of fluid into said tube prior to the dispensing operation, and strainer means inv said container to prevent any particles of dried plasma from entering into said discharge tube.

2. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongatedflexible containerformed from a single sheet oftransparent material doubled upon itselfto provide a closed bottom, and an open mouth, one wall of said mouth being .providedwith an extended extremity,

for sealing said mouth, the longitudinal edges of said container being; united, said container havmg a reduced central portion providing communication between opposed bag+like receptacles, one receptacle adapted to contain dried plasma and the other receptaclezadaptedto contain distilled water,.frangible. clamping means on said I reduced central portion whereby removal of said clamping, means will provide fluid communication between said opposed receptacles to restore said plasma to liquid :form, a discharge tube communicating with the interior. of vsaid container at theclo'sed bottom thereof to' permit the dispensing of restored plasma from'said apparatus. and clamping means on said discharge tube to prevent the entry of fluid into said tube prior to the dispensing operation.

3. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongated flexible container manufactured from a single sheet of transparent material bent upon itself to provide a ciosed bottom and an open mouth, one wall of said mouth being provided with an overlapping extremity for sealing said mouth, the longitudinal edges of said container being united, said container having a reduced central portion providing communication between opposed baglike receptacles, one receptacle adapted to contain dried plasma and the other receptacle adapted to contain distilled water, clamping means for said reduced central portion whereby removal of said clamping means will provide fluid communication between said opposed receptacles to restore said plasma to liquid form, and a discharge tube communicating with the interior of said contamer at the closed bottom thereof to permit the dispensing of restored plasma from said apparatus.

4. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongated flexible container 7 fabricated from a single sheet of flexible material bent upon itself to provide a closed bottom and an open mouth portion, one wall of said mouth portion being provided with an overlapping extremity for sealing said mouth, the longitudinal edges of said container being united, said container having a reduced central portion providing communication between opposed bag-like receptacles, one receptacle adapted to contain dried plasma and the other receptacle adapted to contain distilled water, frangible clamping means for said reduced central portion whereby fracture of said clamping mean's will provide fluid communication between said opposed receptacles torestore saidplasrna to liquidform, and a dischargetube communicating with the interior of said, container at the closed bo ttom thereof to permit thedispensing of restored plasma from said apparatus, r

\ 5. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongated flexible contaiher having a reduced central portion intermediate the extremities thereof providing communication between opposed bag-like receptacles, one receptacle adapted to contain dried plasma and the other receptacle adapted to contain distilled water, frangible clamping means for said reduced central portion whereby fracture of said clamping means will provide fluid connection between said opposed receptacles to commingle said dried plasma and distilled water restoring said plasma to liquid form, a discharge tube communicating with the interior of one of said receptacles to permit the dispensing of restored plasma from said apparatus, and clamping means on said discharge tube to prevent entry of fluid into said tube prior todispensing therefrom.

5.. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising a flexible container provided with av closed. bottom and an open mouth portion, the side. walls of saidcontainer being reduced intermediate the extremities thereof to provide two. bag-like receptacles havingatubular connecting portion therebetween, one receptacle adapted. to. contain dried plasma and the other receptacle .adaptedto .contain distilled water, fluid connection between the two. receptacles being had through said .tubularconnecting portion, anoverlapping portiononone wall of said mouth portion for sealing said mouth, frangible clamping means for said connecting portion to prevent the commingling of the contents of said receptacles, whereby rupture of said means will permit the combining of said dried plasma and said distilled water to restore said plasma to liquid form, and a discharge tube communicating with one of said receptacles to permit the dispensing of restored plasma from said apparatus.

7. An apparatus for administering blood plasma comprising an elongated flexible container, frangible clamping means engaging said container to provide opposed bag-like receptacles, one receptacle adapted to contain dried plasma and the other receptacle adapted to contain distilled water, fluid communication between said receptacles for restoring said dried plasma to liquid form being had by fracture of said clamping means, and a discharge tube communicating with the interior of said container to permit the dispensing of restored plasma from said apparatus.

HILTON W. ROSE.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 605,178 Ferguson June 7, 1.898 1,159,160 Beringer Nov. 2, 1915 1,786,090 Schmidt et a1 Dec. 27, 1920 2,253,571 Miller Aug. 26, 1941 2,328,569 McGaw Sept. 7, 1943 2,362,025 Price Nov. 7, 1944 2,362,537 Butler Nov. 14, 1944 2,409,734 Bucher Oct. 22, 1946 2,483,636 Hardesty Oct. 4, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 116,351 Great Britain June 10, 1918

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2929378 *Oct 14, 1957Mar 22, 1960Lab Vifor S AApparatus for the infusion of liquids in a body, comprising a reservoir for the liquid to be infused
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US3056403 *Jan 26, 1956Oct 2, 1962Baxter Laboratories IncParenteral solution equipment and method of using same
US3064647 *Jun 13, 1957Nov 20, 1962Baxter Laboratories IncBlood component separation method and apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/92, 604/408, 206/69, 604/262, 206/221
International ClassificationA61J1/00, A61M5/14, A61J1/14, A61J1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA61J2001/2034, A61J1/10, A61M5/1409, A61J1/2093
European ClassificationA61M5/14B2, A61J1/20D