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Publication numberUS2663753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1953
Filing dateMay 21, 1948
Priority dateMay 21, 1948
Publication numberUS 2663753 A, US 2663753A, US-A-2663753, US2663753 A, US2663753A
InventorsJames R Bird
Original AssigneeJames R Bird
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coupling means for coaxial electrical lines
US 2663753 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.. 2257 1953 J. R. BIRD COUPLING MEANS FOR COAXIAL EL ECTR I CAL 3L. i"

Filed may 2l, 1948 NVENTOR James R. .Bird

V/wa )L 7* ATTORNEYS Dec. 22, 1953 J. R. BIRD 2,563,753

COUPLING MEANS FOR COAXIAL ELECTRICAL LINES Filed May 2l, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 55 44 E 94 48 47 4Z D //9 F19' 13 INVENTOR James R. Bird "gill/lll! l ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 22, 1953 COUPLING MEANS FOR COAXIAL ELECTRICAL LINES James R. Bird, ChagrihnrFalls, Ohio Application May 21, 1948, Serial No. 28,428

23V Claims.

This invention relates to electrical line coupling devices and morelparti'cularly to means for coupling coaxial components or lines of high frequency electrical circuits In high frequency electrical devices tlievarous components or parts are frequently'connected by coaxial cables or lines comprising outertubular conductors and inner conductors insulated from and concentrically supported with respect to the outer conductors. Considerable difficulty has been ex- 4 erienced in making satisfactory electrical connections between the ends of coaxial lines or cables thatk are to be joined or coupled .together and between the variouselectrical components and the connectingcoaxial cables` or lines therefor.

The development of vthe art has provided line coupling devices in Vwhich threaded plugs on tubular outer conductors or devices are received in threaded collars or sockets on the ends of other components or lines and the parts are thus secured together. vSuch arrangements are not entirely satisfactoryA since it frequently occurs that a coaxial line having a threaded plug end must be connected to another line or electrical lcomponent also having a threaded plug end.-

The present invention has for one of its principal objects the provision ofV a coupling structure for coaxial lineswhich isof universal application, permitting the ends of lines to -beconnectedto one another interchangeably and alternatively to the ends of different coaxial electrical components without regard to the matter of mating internal and externalthreads or the like.

Another difiicultyencountered in the coupling of coaxial linesand components is axial misalignment of outer tubular conductors. Such misalignment, resulting `in radial shoulders at the joints, is apt to .give rise to objectionable reflections during the yfunctioning of the circuit. The invention thereforecontemplates as another of its objects the provision of coupling means which insures axialalignmentcof. the adjacent ends of the outer conductors of coaxial lines at thecoupling. As a preferential arrangementv it is sought to provide pilot means for guiding the ends vof tubular conductors of cable end ttings into predetermined coaxial: alignment as Ithey lare drawn together into abuttingrelation in `a coupling structure;

Another acute problem lencountered in the construction ofhigh frequency electrical devices is the connecting .of coaxialcomponentsor lines havingconductors .ofrdiierent diameters.' To avoid .reflections and other objectionable phenomena,` certain diameter ratios are maintained between the :inner'and outer conductors of a coaxial line, the ratio varying Ywith the dielectric constant of' the insulating material separating .the conductors. While it may appear that conductordiametersv and dielectric material can change abruptly so long as basic ltheoretical ratios and relations areadhered to, superior results are obtained in high frequency coaxial circuits in which changes in conductor diameters are eifected gradually. Therefore a further object of the invention is concerned with the provision of coupling means for connecting one coaxial line 0r cable to another such line or cable or to a coaxial electrical component having conductors of diierent diameters. Moreparticularly, this aspect ofthe invention contemplates the provision of a tapered coaxial line coupling in which the transition from one diameter is effected gradually, preferably over tapered conductors that are several times longer than their maximum diameters.'

A still further object isto provide a coaxial line coupling device which incorporates improvements in the means vfor electrically connecting the inner conductors. More specifically, this aspect of the invention seeks to provide inner conductor connecting meanslrwhich effect electrical connections ofjthe inner conductors at a substantially uniform vor constant diameter across the connection. Asa further renement of this phaseof'the invention the inner connector provides for limited axial movement of the inner conductors toward and away from one another `while maintaining the electrical connection therebetween. Such an arrangement permits the coupling together oi' coaxial lines or components with theouter conductors thereof in rigid or nonyieldingabutment, vslight irregularities and tolerances in length beinglcompensated for by the longitudinal adjustment provided in the connector structure joiningthe ends of the inner conductors.

vThe above andotherobjects and vadvantages ofthe invention pertaining to details of construction andarrangements of parts which will become apparent as the following detailed description proceeds are embodied in coupling structures whichare simple and inexpensive to manufacture and which incorporate' a minimum number of parts. The description isfmade with reference to the accompanyingcdrawings forming a part of the specification. Like parts throughout the several views are in dicatedby the same letters and numeralsofreference.V

patent Serial No. 777,516, led October 2,

drical end portions In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view, with parts broken away and removed, showing a coupling for connecting a high frequency coaxial component to a coaxial line of different or smaller diameter;

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view, with parts broken away and removed, taken substantially on the line indicated at 2-2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view with parts removed, taken substantially on the line indicated at 3-3 of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is an expanded fragmentary elevational detail, partly in section and with parts removed, showing the meeting ends of the inner conductors in separated relation and on an enlarged scale with respect to Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an elevational detail partly in section and similar to Fig. 4, showing the meeting ends of the inner conductors in assembled relation;

Fig. 6 is a transverse sectional detail taken substantially on the line indicated at -c of Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 is an elevational view partly in longitudinal section and with parts broken away and removed showing the meeting ends of a universal coupling structure of the present invention, the conductors being of uniform diameter;

Fig. `8 is a detail showing an end View of one of the inner conductors of the preceding ligure, this view being taken along the line indicated at ti-'e of Fig. 7 and enlarged with respect to that View;

Fig. 9 is an elevational View partly in section, showing the connector element or plug for the inner conductors of Fig. 7 on an enlarged scale with respect to that figure;

Fig. 10 is an elevational view partly in section and with parts broken away and removed, vshowing a universal coupling structure of modified form employing a splice insert;

Fig. 1l is a fragmentary sectional detail taken longitudinally through another universal coupling structure which employs a modined form of splice insert;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of a plug type connector element for joining the ends of the central conductors of a coaxial line; and

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary sectional detail tairen longitudinally through a coupling structure such as that of Fig. 7 showing a modification employing the connector plug of Fig. 12.

Coupling structures such as shown in Figs. l through 6 are useful in connecting high frequency coaxial components to lines or other components having different diameters. For example, it might connect the high frequency electrical device or resistor of my copending application for i947, now Patent No. 2,556,642, issued June l2, 1951, to a coaxial line having an outer conductor of relatively small diameter. In the illustrated structure a transition device A is connected at its small diameter end to the connector B of a coaxial line and at its other or large diameter end to resistor -device C which is the high frequency electrical device disclosed in the copending application referred to above.

The transition member or device A comprises an outer tubular conductor of metal such as brass,

of substantially circular cross to end, and formed with cylinl and 2 and a tapered or frustoconical central portion 3. The major por- .tion of the length of the transition member is embodied in the tapered portion 3, the length of which is several times its maximum diameter,

copper or bronze, section from end being at least about twice as long as its maximum internal diameter and preferably about three or more times as long as its maximum internal diameter. The tapered portion 3 is also longer than either of the cylindrical portions l and 2 and may be integral with such portions or formed separately and joined thereto in coaxial relation as by telescopic joints, one of which is indicated at ll. Such joints are securedA by brazing or soldering.

AThe coaxial line or cable (not shown in Fig. l) is conventional and terminates in a conventional end connector which includes outer conductor 5 and inner conductor 5 separated by a tube i of suitable dielectric material. A knurled collar 8 is formed at one end with a radial flange received with a running rit in a circumferential groove in the outer conductor 5 of the cable end connector. The other end of the collar is internally threaded and received over the externally threaded small diameter end portion i of the transition member as indicated at d.

The large diameter end portion 2 of the transition device A is externally threaded and connected by universal coupling assembly D to end connector or iitting E of a coaxial line or oomponent. The connector E comprises a tubular outer conductor element IS having at one end a square flange IE secured by cap screws I2 to a matching flange i3 of a metal member 2l attached as by solder to the coaxial electrical component or structure C. rlChe member 21 corresponds to the connector 2l described in the above referred to copending application and the metal cone or outer member id corresponds to the connector it disclosed in the same application.

rihe inner conductor 6 of the coaxial line connector B terminates in a reduced diameter portion which is received within a longitudinal split sleeve portion E5 of a contact element 2Q on the small end of tapered inner conductor il of the transition device. The tapered inner conductor il has an integral cylindrical portion IB at its small diameter end disposed coaxially within the cylindrical end portion l of the transition outer conductor. The Contact element 20 is of the same diameter as the conductor portion i8 and is telescoped over and soldered to a reduced diameter end of the conductor portion i8.

Within the large diameter cylindrical portion 2 of the transition outer conductor the inner conductor il is formed with an integral cylindrical end 2i electrically connected to a cylindrical inner contact element 22 disposed coaxially in the tubular outer conductor element lll. The element 22 is received as by telescopic fit 2d and soldered on the small diameter end of tapered inner connector 23 of the electrical component C terminating the coaxial line.

The inner conductor El or at least the cylindrical end 2! thereof is formed of resilient spring-like conductive material such as beryllium-copper or bronze and the end 2! is axially drilled and longitudinally split along diametric intersecting planes, forming a plurality of parallel spring-like (Figs. 4 6). Conical or tapered surfaces 25 on the ends of the tines are slidably received'within a tapered socket 25 on the end of the contact element 22. The tines on the end 2i of the inner conductor are initially sprung apart as shown in Fig. 4 so that, as the parts are drawn together in assembly, the tapered surfaces 25 on the ends of the tines contact and bear against the tapered surface 2g of the receiving socket and are radially compressed,

thereby effecting positive electrical connection between the parts which, by reason ofthe resiliency of thetines, is maintained'for slight axial shifting or movement of. the conductors.

Preferably the slopes of the tapered surfaces 25 and are such that in assembled'relation (Fig. 5) the tips or small endsof the tines on the conductor portion 2l are separated 4from the surrounding socket walls 26 byan annular space 30. The angle of the conicalsocket 26 is less than the angle or slope of the conical or tapered tine ends 25. Electrical contact between the tines of the conductor end 2l and the element 22 is thus established and maintained substantially at thin, knife-like tip end 3l of the contact element. By this arrangement electrical connection between the component parts of the inner conductor is eifectedsubstantiall'y. at the maximum diameter of the conductor, thus obtaining improved transmission characteristics in' high frequency electrical applications.

Supporting the inner conductor l1 within the tubular outer conductor of the transition member A is an insulating body 33 of solid dielectric material such as polyethylene or other thermoplastic coinposition. This insulating dielectric is continuous substantially from end to end Vof the transition device A including the cylindrical end portions l and 2. The insulating dielectric 38 has a coenicient ci thermall expansion different from that of the bronze, copper, or brass, cf which the conductors 3 and I1 are made and provision is made for differential expansion and contraction in the form of elongated axially extending slots 3e cut in the tapered portion 3 of the outer conductor. These slots permit radial expansion and contraction of the insulating di-A electric to and minimize any tendency of the dielectric to shift or expand axially under temperature changes. Thus axial shifting of the inner conductor is eliminated.

Another insulating body 33 of solid dielectric material fills the annular space between the tubular conductor element In and the inner` element 22 and supports the latter in coaxial relation to the former. The insulating dielectric 33 being subject to the heat of the oil iilled electrical component or resistor device C is of heat resistant composition such as pclytetrafluoroethylene and serves as a liquid sealing plug to retain the oil or other liquid dielectric within the resistor device. Since the dielectric plug 33 has a dielectric constant which diners from and is lower than that of the insuiating body 38 inthe transition device the internal diameter ofthe successive outer or tubular conductors may diier as shown. If, however, the same insulating ma# terial, or insulating materials having the saine di electric constants, are used for the tubular plugs or bodies 33 and 38 the internal diameters of the cylindrical end portion 2 of the transition device A and conductive surface 34' of the element iii are made equal or substantially so, .to satisfy the fundamental principles or formulas governing the design of coaxial electrical lines.

Circumferentially extending flanges 35 and 35 of relatively shallow radial depth are provided at the ends of the conductive surface 34 on the inside of the outer conductor I3 toengage the ends of the dielectric plug 33* so as to locate the latter and resist axial shifting thereof. The flange Se is formed on one end of the conductor element IQ, the dielectric plug 33 being initially inserted through the opposite end of the conductor element inassembly. The-flange .35 is formed internally on the member 21 at the small diameter end 1 of the' tapered or conical surface 28'ther`eof. To prevent leakage'of'oil or other liquid dielectric fromthe'" chamber in the resistor device C, a resilient'dforrnable O ring 49' is interposed between the flanges Hand I3, a suitable annularl` groove` being formed` in the flange Il toreceivetheO ring. The flange Il is located inwardly from the end'of the conductor element l0 providing an vaxial extension 4l on the latter which projectsk beyond the meeting plane of the 'flanges 1 I and I3 and is received'slidingly within a mating socket formed in the connector member 21. Thusthe'conductor element I0 and thefl'angcd'inember 21 are piloted'together during assembly to -provide positive'concentricity and establish -the desired' electricalY characteristics;

In' a coaxial line structure involving a transition' from'cylindrical conductors' to tapered or conical conductors,4 it 'has been found advantageous to arrange vparts so that the plane of the circle of intersection' between the cylindrical and conical outer conductors is onset axially with respect to the plane of the lcorresponding junction or circle of 'intersectionof the inner conductors.` An applicationof lsu'chan arrangement is illustrated in Fig. l inthe transition between the cylindrical conductors 'of the connector E and the conical' conductors of theco'axial component or device C. The inner""conductive surface of the tubular element |70 and'the'inner conical face 28 of the member' 21 intersect in a plane indi cated at 29. This plane contains the end face of the 'soliddielectric orinsulating plug 33 and is the meeting plane ofthe liquid and solid dielectrics.

The plane 'of interse'ction'between the surface of the conical inner'conducto'r 23 and the cyiindrical conductive'faceof'theconductor 22 is indicate'd at 32, coinciding" with the shoulder against which is abutted the end of tubular portion 24 of the cylindrical conductor. The intersecting Vplane 32'of theinne'r conductors is offset axially'with respect'to theintersecting plane 29 of the outer conductors in the direction of the large ends of the Vconical conductors. The amount of such onset varies with the cone angle or taper of lthe conical 'conductors and with the diameters of the cylindrical conductors. It has been found that a satisfactory approximation is realized in laying out' the design of the line by describing a circular arc 31'representing a spherical surface with center 51 thereof substantially at the apex of the cone derlnedby the elements of one of the tapered conductive' surfaces and with the ends of the arc crossing the 'intersection between the cylindrical conductive surface 34 and the conical conductive surface 28. Thus the spherical surface of 'the arc 31 contains the circle of intersection between the tapered and cylindrical conductive' surfaces. The offset between the plane 29 andthe'plane 32 is such that the spherical surfa'cegerirated'by a'radius from' the common 'center 551V contains the circles of intersection between the" cylindrical and conical portions of 'both the inner and the outer conductive surfaces'.

The center point 51,'showr'i`as the center of the cone of the oute'r tapered surface,.also 'coincides with the apex of the'cone defined by the surface elements of the inner `conical conductor 23. Thus, in 'designing tapered transition devices for connecting coaxial lines or components of different diameters, the tapers or 'slopes of the inner and outer conductive surfaces and also the axial offsets of the several planes of intersection between the conical and cylindrical surfaces are readily determined by employing this point intersection method.

For example, in laying out the transition device of Fig. 1 the relationship between the conicalY inner surface of the tapered portion 3 of the outer conductor and the conical surface of the inner conductor Il is established by arranging these surfaces so that extensions of their elements intersect at a common point. Such point is the apex of the cone of the inner conductor and alsoy the apex of the cone of the outer conductor. This point of intersection, or common apex, is the center from which are struck the arcs of the spherical surfaces which contain the circles of intersection between the tapered surface of the inner conductor Il and its cylindrical ends I3 and 2|. These arcs also intersect the outer conductor of the transition device at the intersections between the conical conductive surface of the tapered portion 3 and the conductive surfaces of the cylindrical end portions i and 2. In this connection it is to be noted that the single point intersection or common cone apex provides the center for the are or spherical surface establishing the axial osets, not only as between the tapered'and cylindrical surfaces at the small diameter end.` of the transition device, but also as between the tapered and cylindrical surfaces at the relatively large diameter end of the device.

The universal coupling structure or assembly D which draws the 4transition device A and the resistor device C axially together into end to end abutting relation includes a pair of sleeves 42 and 43 which are interlocked against axial separation but are relatively rotatable for turning about a common axis. For example, the sleeve 43 may be formed at one end with a circumferentially extending outwardly directed radial flange 44 which is received behind and is overlapped by a circumferentially extending inwardly directed radial flange 45 on one end of the sleeve 42, the iianges and sleeves being sized to provide running ts.

The cylindrical end portion 2 of the transition member A and the abutting end portion, also cylindrical, of the conductor element I are formed with external threads that are identical and of the same diameter. The coupling sleeve 43 is formed with matching internal threads so as to be receivable on either the transition member A or the conductor element I6. An outer portion 5l .or the sleeve is unthreaded and serves as a guide in screwing the sleeve onto the tubular member of the coaxial line or component being assembled therewith. In the arrangement illustrated the threaded connection of the coupling sleeve on the conductor I0 is indicated at 46. An internally threaded collar 41 is received as by a press t within the coupling sleeve 42 and serves as a stop for engagement with the flanged end of the sleeve 43 to hold the coupling sleeves in assembled relation. A thin axial flange 4B formed on the end of the coupling sleeve 42 remote from the flange 45 is rolled or pressed radially inwardly against a tapered or conical end face 49 on the collar 4l to retain the latter on the sleeve. Suitable means such as soldering or bracing may also be used to supplement the press t between the parts to resist relative movement of the coupling sleeve 42 on the collar 41.

The internal threads on lthe collar 4l are identical to the threads formed on the interior of the coupling sleeve 43 and are received on the threaded end of the transition member A, the threaded connection between the parts being indicated at 56. An outer portion of the internal face of the collar 4l is without threads and serves to guide the parts into correct alignment during assembly. rlhus while the coupling sleeve 43 is shown screwed on to the conductor element lli and the threaded collar of the coupling sleeve 42 is shown threaded on to the transition member A the parts are so designed and constructed that they may be reversed with the sleeve 43 on the transition device and the sleeve 42 on the l5 conductor element i4 of the resistor device terminal. Furthermore, the provision of the externally threaded end on the terminal element I9 permits 4the resistor device (or electrical component) C to be connected to conventional coaxial lines of the proper size having attaching collars corresponding to the collar 8 described in connection with the coaxial line B. The external threads o-n the cylindrical end portion 2 of the transition device enable the latter to be connected to coaxial devices, components, or lines other than the resistor shown, either directly or by using the universal coupling D of the present invention.

in the coupling of coaxial lines and devices it is vital to maintain concentricity and also to maintain positive electrical connection between the abutted outer or tubular conductors around substantially the entire circumferential extent of the latter. lt is especially important that the electrical connection between the outer or tubular conductors be established at the inner diameter thereof so as to eliminate diameter changes along the length of the transmission line. Otherwise, objectionable wave reflections are apt to occur in the transmission of high frequency current and perfect transmission cannot be obtained. ln the universal coupling structure of the present invention, accurate alignment of the abutted ends of the outer or tubular conductors is obtained by a circular pilot ring 52 carried by one of the coupling sleeves, the sleeve 43 in the embodiment illustrated. rllhis pilot may take the form of an integral circumferentially extending inwardly directed radial flange of relatively short axial length which spans the gap between the ends of the outer conductors to serve as a guide as the inner conductors 2i and 22 are initially engaged and drawn together by the screw action of the coup-ling sleeves.

At the extreme ends of the externally threaded portions of the transition device and the conductor element le are thin shell-like cylindrical flanges `i3 which are drawn into circumferential abutment with one another as the line structure is assembled. The shell flanges 53 have inner surfaces which extend as continuations of the respective conductive inner `surfaces of the tubular conductors on which they are formed. By reason of 4the thin section of the shell flanges 53 they effect positive electrical contact under the contractive pressure applied to the joint by the coupling sleeves 42 and 43, the electrical contact being established around substantially the entire circumferential extent of the joint.

In assembling the universal coupling structure of the present invention the sleeve 43 is initially screwed onto one of the tubular outer c-onductors until the pilot flange or guide 52 is received on the shell flange 53 and is disposed against a shallow radial limiting shoulder 54 of the cony manually vr,or thesleeve 42 is threaded `onto the second tubufductor. Thereafter Ythe end. ttinsfof thefother e orf electrical component :beine Aconnected is brought into registry-and the col1ar41 lar conductor. As the tinesof the cylindrical .eendll of one of theinner conductors are received v,within the tapered socket 26 of the vother inner conducto-r, the shell 1'lange53 of the seco-nd outer conductor is receivedwithinfthe :pilot flange "52 and is guided thereby .into accurate alignment with Yand abutment against the shell viiange 53 .of the rst outerconductor. To facilitate assensbly the leading edge corners of the inside vfaceof ythepgilot ilange or guide 52 are 'beveled or relieved Yto pro-vide the charners shown.

In Fig. 7 -is illustrated .an application of the .principles of the present invention to la universal lcoupling structure for .connecting the ends of coaxial lines or cables. The couplingsleeve assernlolyv D lis of .substantially thesarne construction as that described in the preceding figures. Afset screw. 55 is shown as an alternate. means Y for .locking the threadedcollar 41 against relative rotation or movement in the sleeveAZ.

A pair of substantially identical rigid tubular outer conductorsr (corresponding parts of coaxial component, line or Acable ,connectors E .to be connected) ,are 4formedon their endswith identical external threads 58 which receive alternatively the internallythreaded collar 41. of the Vsleeve 42 and the internally threaded sleeve 43.

VAt their extreme meeting lends the conductors 1156er@ formed with thinsh'ell-like axially directed fiianges' Sil ycorrespondingi to `the ,flanges ,53 .de-

scribed in ,connection .with Fig. 1. AThe inner cylindrical surfaces ofthe flanges 60 are the same diameter as and extend as continuations of the inside; faces of the tubular conductors. The shell 'flarlees are brought. into abutment with one another under relatively high localized pressure and a relatively smooth substantially unbroken conductive surface is provided across the joint for the transmission of electrical current.

In assembling the ends oftcoaxial components, lines or cables the coupling sleeve `i3 yis rst screwed onto the rigid outer tubular conductor of one or the cable end connectors E until the pilot flange or ring 52 of the -coupling'sleeve Yis abutted against circumferential shoulder El of such conductor. This nshoulder corresponds to the shoulders 5 previously describedand is present on both or the tubular outer conductors A5t -so that the coupling sleeves Vl2 and l43 are Vrever- -sible on the conductors. yAfter the sleeve `43 is assembled on the outer conductor of one of the cableend'connectors-with the shell flange ..160 of the latter embracedby the guide ring 52, the other cable end connector is brought into registry andthe threaded collar 41' ofthe coupling sleeve 42 is screwed into position. This action .draws the shell i'ianges into..abutment, piloted by .the guide ringgor flange 5'2.

'Theinner conductors. ofthe coaxial lines connected to the cable connectors E terminate in vfilmer conductorelements whichgare in the form of round or cylindrical metalorods vor :bars concentrically supported wit-hin the cuter vconductors `by annular bodies of solid insulating or dielectric material E3. The meeting or confront- -ing -ends of the inner `conductors 6,2 are axially drilled or bored to formtubulartips-Which are yslit longitudinally. at el (Fig-5-8) forming a Vnurn- --ber offaxially extending resilient tines 5,5. The .extreme fende of :the tines E5 ,are internally :benelcd 4providing inside.gtapered.or c onic faces 66. A plug type connector element 6B (Fig. 9)

vblies D.

is Vreceived between-"the vends l.of-.the :inner vconductor elements to: effect an electricalfconnection therebetween. The outer ormaximumdiameter ofthe bulbousor fbiconic. central portion ofv the connector 68 is substantiallyequal to thatffof the inner conductors-.6I and the yends -ofv theetines S5 are tapered out .to thin .wedge shaped or knifelike edgeswhich ride up-conical facesf'l of the central portion of thefconnectorelement 4during assembly of the. coaxial-lines,-therebyneffecting electrical connection between `the .parts substantially at thermaximum diameterzof the ,connector element. The conductor `tines .65.are sprung inward .slightly tbefore@assemblyso .as individually to lbear strong-lygaeainst the `conical facesv 6.1.4 of the. connectorx elementeand effect .a positiveelecytrical connectiontherewith which. is. substantially continuous `:about thefentire. circumferentialex- Ytent of the connectonplug.

The connector plug or element, shown enlarged in Fig. .9, includes azcentral-portionsubstantially .bconical .-in shape,.having .a relatively' longxaxis approximately coincident .With'the Aaxes vof Vthe vcoaxialv line end .connectors .being joined .in the couplingstructure. Substantially.cylindrical extension ,portions .1 0 .on the .ends lof vthe connector .A elementare received within .the bores inthe ends .of the inner conductors 6.2 and are surrounded .by the tines thereof. Prior to assemblyof'the coaxial lines, .oneof the extensions `'HJ of 4the ccnnectorelement 68 .is .inserted Within the socket or vbore .otono .of lthe, central'conductors arxd'the resilient grip of the tines retainsthe connector element .during assembly. Asp'the coaxial lines are. .drawn togetherand the'tinesiGSfi-ide up the conical or tapered faces'll ofthe'connectorele ment the ex tensionslllr are released4 by the tines and thevconnector .elementgis then centered -a-nd .held solely by'the `frictiona'lgripcf the tipr'or thin .wedge-like end edges ofthe resilient tines 65 which center the plug between the `conductors and permit limitedaxial shifting of the -conduetors without breaking or interrupting the-electrical connection. Thediameter of the biconical connector plug is-substantia'lly equal to the -diarneter of the inner vconductors t2 so that-theplug acts as alimiting'pilotin assembly to r'distend the'sprung int-inesf' tothe normal'dia-meter of the conductors.

The several elements of theca-ble end connectors YE of Fig. '7 terminate -in -a commonHplane which -isthe plane -of abutment of thecoupling structure. That is,'the endiace of each. of the insulating "dielectric Abodies 163 :is .substantially flush with Athe end r=e" ige :of fthe corresponding shell ilange-BU and with the thin, 4lzniie#like/:edges of the innerconductoritinesilSS. Accordinglyra relatively ruggedcable end structure or connector is provided Which resists; deformationaand injury in use though repeatedly*.connectedand=.discon nected insmakingfvarious fhookeups of.- apparatus :III the coupling assembly A'the space :between .the inner and outer conductorsissealed off bythe dielectrics 63 :which are-abutted against. .onetanother, excluding dust, dirt, andother .foreign materiaL'and byvthefmeeting edges-ofthe thin shell flanges-60 which :are heldtogether .under relatively f high unit pressure.

In Fig. ,10 is illustrated a luniversal coupling fstructuren which the end` connectors -E of .coaxial electrical linesfare joined `byasplicelconnector F, vthe latter rbeing, retained .between .the end connectors E byv one of @the coupling ,assemvIn ythis embodiment of .the Vinvention the threaded sleeves 43, without pilot extensions,

are threaded onto opposite ends 4of externally threaded metal tube 12 of the splice F. This tube has an internal cylindrical face 13 of the same V outer tube conductors 56 of the connectors E. As l the parts are drawn together by the threaded connections the pilot rings 52 of the sleeves 43 receive the shell flanges on the ends of the tubular conductors 56 and guide them into abutting engagement with the mating axial shell anges 14 of the splice tube 12.

VA tubular inner conductor 16, disposed in the center of the connector tube 12 in coaxial relation thereto, is of substantially the same axial length as the outer splice tube. This inner conductor is formed of resilient spring metal hav ing good electrical conductivity, such, for example, as beryllium copper, and is supported by a surrounding body of insulating dielectric material 11 such as polyethylene or polytetrafluoroethylene, as used for the insulating dielectrics 63. During assembly the inner tube 16 receives in its ends tapered or conical ends 18 on the inner conductors 62 of the cable end connectors E.

To establish electrical connection between the conductor element 16 and the inner conductors at or adjacent their maximum diameter, the inner face of the connector 16 at its ends is tapered to form conic sockets, indicated at 69. The angle or slope of each of the internal faces 69 is less than that of the mating external conical faces 18 of the inner conductors so that electrical connection is made between the parts at the maximum diameter of the tubular connector 16. The chamfering at the ends of the tubular connector provides thin knife edges, the extreme tips of which make electrical contact with the inner conductors 19 around substantially the entire circumferential extent of the latter. A number of axial slits 8! are formed in circumferentially spaced relation about the tubular inner conductor 19 and open alternately through the opposite ends of the latter, providing for expansion and contraction of the connector during assembly and disassembly. The tubular connector 16 is initially slightly collapsed or sprung 'together so that the tapered socket ends make substantially circular line contact with the tapered cones 13 of the inner conductors 62 in the initial stages of assembly and ride up the conical contactl surfaces as the threaded outer collars 41 draw the parts rmly together in the final stages of assembly. In the assembled coupling structure the diameter of the inner conductor remains substantially constant across the splice, there being no objectionable diameter changes in the electrical connections between the splice connector 16 and the inner conductors 62.

The construction of the end. connectors E for attachment to coaxial cables is illustrated in Figs. '7 and 10. 'Ihe outer tubular conductors 56 are similar in design to the conductor element I previously described in connection with Figs. 1 and 2, the internal iiange 36 for retaining the dielectric plug being omitted. Conventional coaxial lines or cables on which the end connectors E are assembled each comprise an outer conductive shield 82 formed of diagonally woven or braided conductive metal wires or tapes, an inner conductor 83 in the form of a copper rod or wire, a tubular insulating body 84 which may be of the same material as that used for the insulating dielectrics 63 and 11 of the couplings and connectors, and an outer protective tubular jacket 85 of tough abrasion resistant insulating material such as a suitable vinyl compound.

An end portion of the jacket 85 is stripped. away and end 81 of the braided shield 82 is expanded to expose the insulation 84, which is cut away from the end of the inner conductor 83. The inner conductor 62 of the end connector E is withdrawn from its supporting dielectric 63 an -telescoped over the exposed end of the inner conductor 83 of the coaxial cable. The conductor 62 is formed with an axial bore 68 that slidingly receives the cable conductor and the parts are secured together as by solder. The conductor 62 is then inserted into the central bore in the supporting dielectric 63 and the latter is forced snugly against the insulating dielectric 96 of the cable. In this operation the expanded end 91 of the woven shield 82 is guided over axial extension 89 of the tubular conductor 56. The woven shield is clamped between the conductor extension 89 and a radial shoulder of a flange 99 formed on the inside of a collar 9| previously placed over the coaxial cable.

The collar is formed with a circumferentially extending square shaped radial flange 92 which matches a corresponding ange 93 on the tubular conductor 56. The flanges 92 and 93 may correspond in shape to the flanges I3 and l respectively, previously described in connection with the device illustrated in Figs. l and 2. Cap screws, one of which is indicated at 99, extend through apertures in the flanges 92 and are threaded into aligned openings in the flanges 93 to hold the parts together. A seal is provided by a rubber O ring 95 received in an annular channel 96 in the end face of the flange 93. Clearance 91 between the iianges 92 and 93 assures positive gripping of the woven or braided shield or outer conductor 82 of the coaxial cable between the tubular extension 89 of the end tting .conductor 56 and the shoulder of the iiange 99 of the connector collar 9i. The collar 9i is split longitudinally as indicated at 98 so as to be contracted by an embracing device of the hose clamp type indicated at 99. For holding the coaxial cable within the connector collar the latter may be of any desired length, the design shown in the drawings being relatively short. Longer collars may employ more than one of the clamps 99 thereby obtaining a stronger grip on the sheath 85 of the coaxial cable.

In Fig. 11 is illustrated a modied coupling of the universal type in which the tubular outer conductors 56 of the connectors E are held together by a coupling assembly D like that previously described, the internally threaded sleeve :i3 being relatively long so as to accommodate a relatively short splice insert G between the pilot flange 52 of the sleeve and the shell iiange 69 of the outer conductor 56.

splice tube |00 is provided with locating means in trionfo-'tm orasirouuriisioily. mnoiodioiogrsl .flange |03 Whichroverlaps theshellilange SQf oneof the cndu'ctorsvtie'ange L03 lining shorter. than 'the shell angef. of the conductor 'so .that `the end [of 'the flatter is forced' .snugly againstthecircular radial yshoulder onthe endirovf the shell I ilf to effect a potyefelectrialfconvn ection.` between the parts which extends around .substantially the entirev circumferential vextent of the`conduc`tor at the diametei- Qfftheinner faces.

= The other .end of thesplice tube Iisfforxned ,oi its iria-o1' folio-noto? `liiflfi ari-axially @gooi-od circularlange lll which ,corr penas to the1 shell gansos .651 of tho iublor' diistors "Tho sans@ -nu isreg ed witninthe piit. aange .5 2 v 'of'lthe couplingsY eveud, the Ypilot ge'eing drawn snuglyagainst a circiimferent 1` shoulder |05 of the .splice tube I B so that the lattrnis .retained firmly botwogn iho-Ploilongo and ilo elia' or the wenn jovaducto' 15a pms' which, the coupling sleeve is threaded. .'Ilhe shell ange |54 of the splice tube' is'of less axial length't an the ,pilot `ilange 52 of the threaded ',cu'pling sleeve so that thelatter alszoreceives andfguides ,the shell ilanger of the',otherconnectortube as, the latter being heifi in piace, bythe' threaded collar d? of the coupling assembly.

,The inner' conductorsjl of the. cable .connectors ofthe embodiment of Fig. `11 arasnnilafto those` described infconnection.Withglig l0, `but havelongitndinal slQts Yl'll'l .j 1jenir ig throughV their ends, forming tines H16 k which corn-spend tothe tines 3l of the V innenfcon'ducters ,shawn in Figs. l through .6. i Tapered'orleonic rtips |68 `,cyr'nthe conductor .tines |05 are'rec'eived u iithirrthe.internally coned .ends .of a vtubular v'metal fsplice element .|133v .coaxiall'y `s uppcrted within'the ,splice tube vLilli by wineans" of 'an annular bdy of insulating dielectric I D siinilartd Vthe. ii, uvlating body 'H describedin connectinui'thig. `10. As theinnerlconductors Glare dra :Ltogethei" inaSfSfmbling -Vthe coupling', the tines |116 of. the .tube m9,. previously. distende@ or sprung apartgare 'dravvn together .by .the ,action si the' tapered. tips me ,sliding withinthe .gg ical .endsockets ofthe splice elernentpr tnbetiiil.

' Each lof theconductorftips |918 hasagreiater angle of taper than vthe receivingsoclgettherefor in thetube IBS softhat electrical ce t o eiectfed ,between the VAicartsY .at .the engine tips or knife e" ofthesplice tub e atfth e.-n iax m um dianieteiyof the latter. Theresiliency .of the -tines IE6 rnaintains vpositive V)el ectrical vconnection between the parts l fqr Vslight a xia tlv orlong itudinal shifting `of the inner conductors. A splice insert having .a 4tubular inner en ndnctor will longitudinal slots opening through one end only is employed to join vx12-able connectors one ofwhih hasv ,an inner conductor like that .ofiFig l0 the other of which has aninnencnductor v lilgze that of'Fig. 11.

igs. l2 and 13 illustrate aconipressiblehiconic plug l l5 for electrically .joining inner c ondnctors of cable en d connectors .similar tothosedof 7. In this modication the longitudinal slits da Fig. 7 are. omitted, the conductor ends having tubular or hollow ends l t5; providing .opposed sockets |22.V The plug is in thefcrin of a hollow inetal tube having', a billbous nr ,enlarg'd central portion H corresponding to the lozengefshaned central portionof the'plug lll previously deserihed in connectionfvqithfilig. y7.

Longitudinally vr Extending slots v| ,i 7 are tanned in the tubular plug and op'en alternately through Cil Elio foroooiiom @nos ilio'ofso ...that the Plug io portions ||`8 1onth e inside cfy the conductor tube endslll vThee n(larged central lozenge portion of the ,connectoplug has vtapered or conicahsurfaesHB which correspond to the ta- ;neredsides 6,1 ,ofwtheplngjm One method of YI "Kllllfllllgithe comnresslible nlug ||5 is to turn it vtoslinaeonglathe froxri hrass, bronze, or bel'rllium, .Cooper S looft@ Whiohaxiol-boro |20 sllrlled and thevslotslll'l. areinade by saw cuts from opposite. sodo! `One oflthe cylindrical Yportions |2| on the .ends of the 4plug isfored intofhe 4end, socket |22 l ofpiie ,of the 'nnerf terminal conductorsV 62 prior tosassinbly 'f thecoaxial lines being joined. 'Tho diameter. o .,.aoh-.of tho oylidrioal ond nortions |2| of the plug is greaterthan the internal ydiameter,:c ifjeasch ofthesocketsv I 22` so that the I2-.mais received inthe sockets twith .a snap ,or VVfrictioniit w 'ch holds. the parts together until ng Device, disclosing present invention, the luplication;for ,which ,was c opending .with the @soient -oosoiRotor@nooiifsoloo modo to ooaeeflieg, oopliooiioo .for vUnited States Patent Seri?! N-O ,214???31 ,lie-d; Mch 19511 for, Cdn* nootor .for .Elootrolol Tionsmissioo Liooo! do- 'bing .and.laimngisubiectmatter related to that liao @roseo ooooi '-111 aooorlorioo with the .Potent Statutes .the principles ,ofthe present :invention may be utilized to, olio von, numeroso .mom-@ations and alterati ,rio ooioa'oootomrlaiod, substitution arts 4and hanges .in construction being of` p looortao toas @oogst it boing understood that negano ato-,aon inne' drawings .and deare given merely f orpurposes of scr explanation and illustration without intending tplirnitthe isconewohtheclaiuis to the `specific dei" What'.iflainu.anllcsireto .secure lbylietters Potion@ilieoaitedfsaiesfisf l-jlnfao 'a1l 1' n, coiipling structure or the like, tubnlar-yconductors disposable endto end relatidmsleeves.,embracingtheconductors, means fves andperrnitting rel: .tive

iiriterlcicllmig the rothesleevesdand .conductors having" io'f'o .time ,soroivihoods iol" retaining the .sleeves onthecndutorsand.for drawing the tors together saidscrew threads permitl g axially beyond the rijying said one sleeve, ined with a 7substantially guneter y tliantne foot ldiameter of the lthreads ontheconductor .carryngsaid one sleeve, and means onthe pther. ,condi1ctor providing a substantiolls/cylmdrical outwardly directed face of less diameter than .theroot diameter of the threads on such other conductor, said out vard ooo boingroooitaolo .iolosoooioally within the guidering t9 1I Jilot thcconduotors into valigned olation 'f-S .they l ltown together 2. In a co-af alline Quphng structure or the litre, vtubular f. rs nisnosable in yend Lto end r I 1, 'slee,ves, inbracing the conductors, .orlookiog ilioslsoros and permitting relative rotation thereof, the sleeves andtconductors having intertting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, a circular guide ring carried by one of the sleeves as a part thereof and projecting axially beyond the end of the conductor carrying said one sleeve, said guide ring being formed with a substantially cylindrical inwardly directed face, and means on the ends of the conductors providing substantially cylindrical outwardly directed guide surfaces receivable telescopically within the cylindrical face of the guide ring, said guide surfaces and the inwardly directed face of the ring being of less diameter than the minimum diameter ofl all Vother parts of said one sleeve and the guide surfaces being slidable against the guide ring face to pilot the conductors into aligned relation as the latter are drawn together.

3. In a `co-axial line coupling structure or the like, tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof, the sleeves and conductors having interfltting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, a circular guide Vring carried by one of the sleeves as a part thereof and projecting axially beyond the end of the conductor carrying said one sleeve, said guide ring being formed with a substantially cylindrical inwardly directed face, and an axially directed substantially cylindrical shell flange on the other conductor receivable telescopically within the guide ring and having an outwardly directed substantially circular face in sliding relation to the inward face on the guide ring, to pilot the conductors into aligned relation as the latter are drawn together, said shell flange face and said guide ring face being of less diameter than all other parts of the sleeves.

4. In a co-axial line coupling structure or the like, tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof, the sleeves and conductors having interfitting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, a cir-cular guide ring carried by one of the sleeves as a part thereof and projecting axially beyond the end of the conductor carrying said one sleeve, said guide ring being formed with a substantially cylindrical inwardly directed face, and axially directed substantially cylindrical relatively thin shell flanges on the ends of the conductors, said shell flanges having substantially cylindrical outwardly directed guide surfaces receivable telescopically Within the guide ring, the shell flanges being circumferentially embraced by the guide ring and slidable relative to and axially of the guide ring face to pilot the conductors into aligned relation as the latter are drawn together.

5. In a co-axial line coupling structure or the like, tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof, the sleeves and conductors having interiitting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, a circular guide ring carried by one of the sleeves as a part thereof and projecting axially beyond the end of the conductor carrying said one sleeve, said guide ring being formed with a substantially cylindrical inwardly directed face, and axially directed substantially cylindrical relatively thin shell flanges on the ends of the conductors, said shell flanges having substantially cylindrical outwardly directed guide surfaces receivable telescopically within the guide ring, the shell flanges being circumferentially embraced by the guide ring and slidable relative to and axially of the guide ring face to pilot the conductors into aligned relation as the latter are drawn together, the shell ange guide surfaces and the face of the guide ring being of less diameter than the minimum diameter of all other parts of the sleeves, and said shell flanges having lconfronting radially narrow and substantially circular end faces receivable abuttingly against one another upon said drawing together of the conductors.

6. In a co-axial line coupling structure or the like, tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof, the sleeves and conductors having interfltting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, a splice tube disposed between the ends of the conductors in axially aligned abutting relation to the conductors and wholly within the axial limits of the sleeves, and pilot means having substantially cylindrical interiitting surfaces at the adjacent ends of the splice tube and the conductors for guiding the parts together during assembly and for holding the splice tube in predetermined co-axial relation to each of the conductors, said pilot means including a circumferentially extending radially inwardly directed flange on the inside of one of the sleeves, said flange being in engagement with the splice tube and also with one of the conductors and being disposed substantially in the plane of abutment of the splice tube and said one conductor.

7. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, a pair of sleeves embracing the conductors, the sleeves and conductors having intertting formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof and of the conductors retained thereby, one of the conductors being formed with a circumferentially extending external radial shoulder spa-ced axially from the conductor end, and a radially inwardly directed circumferential flange on one of the sleeves, said flange projecting axially beyond the end of the conductor embraced by the sleeve having such flange and being engageable with said shoulder to locate the sleeve on the conductor, the ends of the drawn together conductors abutting one another in a plane spaced axially of the structure from the engaged shoulder and ange.

8. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, the sleeves and conductors having in- 17 terttine formations for retaining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal o the sleeves from the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof and of the conductors retained thereby, a radially disposed circumferential shoulder formed on and adjacent an end of one of the conductors, means on one of the sleeves projecting both axially beyond such end of the one conductor and radially inward and formed with a radial shoulder in confronting relation to the shoulder on the conductor, the sleeve shoulder being engageable against the conductor shoulder to locate the sleeve on the one conductor, and

means on the other conductor receivable within the shouldered locating means engageable against the end of the one conductor, whereby the locating means acts io engage the other conu ductor as the conductors are drawnV together to pilot the conductors into axial alignment.

9. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation and having externally threaded end portions, internally threaded sleeves embracing the threaded portions of the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof in screwing the sleeves onto the conductor ends to draw the latter together into said relation, means on one of the sleeves and engageable with the extreme ends of both conductors simultanously .tor piloting the conductors together in aligned axial relation, and one oi the sleeves and one of the conductors being formed with radial shoulders engageable with one another for locating the shouldered parts in predetermined axial relation when they are screwed together, the shoulder on the conductor being spaced axially from the end of the latter whereby the drawn together conductors abut one another in a plane spaced axially of the structure from the engaged shoulders.

l0. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end relation and having externally threaded end portions, internally threaded sleeves embracing the threaded portions of the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof in screwing the sleeves onto the conductor ends to draw the latter together into said relation, pilot means on one of the sleeves and projecting beyond the end of the conductor having such sleeve screwed theren on, said pilot means being formed to embrace the other conductor as the conductors are drawn t0- gether to guide the conductors into axial alignment, and one of the sleeves and one of the conductors being formed with radial shoulders engageable with one another for locating the shouldered parts in predetermined axial relation when f they are screwed together, the shoulder on the conductor being spaced axially from the end of the latter whereby the drawn together conductors abut one another in a plane spaced axially of the structure from the engaged shoulders.

11. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors oi circular secu tion disposable in end to end contacting relation, sleeves embracing the conductors, the sleeves and conductors having interiitting formations for re taining the sleeves on the conductors and for drawing the conductors together, said formations permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors, means interlocking the sleeves and permitting relative rotation thereof and of the lar conductors one of which has on one end a circumferential directed shell of relatively thin section, the conductors being of circular section, the shell having an internal diameter substantially the same as and an external diameter less than the corresponding diameters of the respective conductors, a pair of sleeves interlocked against axial separation and rotatable one relative to the other, each sleeve embracing one of the conductors, interrltting means on the conductors and sleeves permitting facile removal of the sleeves from the conductors for drawing the conductors together axially and holding them in end to end relation with the conductor end shell abutting the end of the other conductor, and pilot means carried by one of the sleeves for guiding the conductors into axial alignment as they are drawn together, pilot means being substantially circular and having an internal diameter less than the external diameter of either of the conductors and embracing the end shell to reinforce the latter.

13. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantially identical tubular conductors having on their ends relatively thin circular shells extending the internal conductive surfaces of the conductors, the conductors being of circular section, the shells having an internal diameter substantially the same and an external diameter less than the corresponding diameter of the respective conductors, a pair or" sleeves interlocled against axial separation and rotatable one relative to the other, each sleeve embracing one of the conductors, intertting means on the conductors and sleeves permitting facile removal or the sleeves from the conductors for drawing the conductors together axially and holding them in end to end relation with the circular shells in edgewise abutment providing substantially continuous internal conductive surfaces of substantially constant diameter through the structure, and pilot means carried by one of the sleeves and embracing the end shells to reinforce the latter and to guide the conductors into axial alignment as they are drawn together, said pilot means being substantially circular and having an internal diameter less thanv the external diameter of the conductors.

14. In a coaxial line coupling structure having outer tubular conductors and means for drawing the conductors together axially and progressively and for holding the same in end to end axially fixed assembled relation, an inner conductor element ooaxially disposed in each outer conductor, insulating means connecting the inner conductor elements to the respective outer conductors and constraining the inner conductor elements to axial movement with the outer conductors, the elements having axially aligned spaced confronting ends, and a connector element disposed between the ends of the inner conductor elements, the inner conductor elements and the connector element being of circular cross section and having substantially the saine maximum diameter,

Ythe ends of the conductor elements and the connector element being arr-an; d in interiitting relation in the provision or" plug and socket connectionsbetween the inner conductor elements and vthe connector element at each end of the latter,

the innerrpiug end ol connection having an external tapered surface and the outer Vat least one of the elements haring a resilient and radially yieldalole end for expansion and contraction thereof in permitting slight axial movement voi one element relative to another while maintaining the line contact electrical connections,- the outer surface of the connector element at said maximum constituting the electrical conductive suriace between the axially spaced ends of the inner conductors.

l5. ln combination in a coaxial line structure, aY pair ol rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end axially relation and having sub stantially smooth internal surfaces, coupling means for drawing the conductors into and holding the conductors in s a pair or inner circular sectioned. al diameter conductor elements disposed w hin the tubular conductors and axially aligned with one another, the inner conductor elements having confronting axially spaced ends when the tubular conductors are so held, insulators of solid dielectric material substantially completely filling the annular spaces between the tubular conductors and the respective inner conductor elements and serving to support the latter in the tubular conductors, a con-= nector element disposed between the inner conductor element ends, the ends of the conductor elements and the connector element being arranged in intertting relation in the provision of Vplug and socket connections between the inner conductor elements and the connector element at each end of the latter, the inner plug end of each such connection having an external tapered surface and the outer socket end. of each such connection making substantially circular line contact with the tapered surface of the inner plug intertting therewith to establish electrical contacts between the elements, at least one of the elements having a resilient and radially yieldable end for expansion and contraction thereof in permitting slight axial movement of one element relative to another while maintaining line contact electrical connection, and the outer surface of the connector element including a portion of substantially the same diameter as the inner conductor elements and constituting the electrical conducting surface between the inner conductor elements, the solid insulator supporting each inner conductor extending axially along such supported condoctor substantialy to the plane of the circular line Contact between such conductor and the connector element.

i6. In a coaxial line coupling structure having outer tubular conductors and means for drawing the conductors together axially and holding the same in end to end axially fixed assembled relation, inner conductor elements coaxially disposed one in each outer conductor, and a connector element disposed between the ends i the inner conductor elements, the ends of the elements being formed with connections which include 'tapered surfaces in the provision of intertting self-centering portions in the connections between the connector element and the inner consubstantially ductor elements, the inner conductor elements and the connector element all being or circular cross section and having substantially the same maximum diameter, and the connections including another intertting connection portion between the connector element and at least one of the inner conductor elements for holding the connector element in assembled relation to the one inner conductor element during assembly and disassembly of the coupling Structure, said other connection portion compri ing a plug and socket combination in which an axially extending plug on one element is received in and irictionally restrained against withdrawal from a socket in another of the elements.

17. In combination in a coaxial line structure, a pair of rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end axially fixed relation and having sub stantially smooth internal surfaces and threaded external surface portions adjacent their ends, means providing a radially disposed circumferential shoulder on at least one of the conductors, a pair of inner conductor elements disposed within the tubular conductors and axially aligned with one another, the inner elements having ends in spaced confronting relation, a conductive element disposed between the confronting ends of the inner conductor elements, the ends oi the conductor elements and the connector element being arranged in interrltting relation in the provision of plug and socket ccnnections between the inner conductor elements and the connector element at each end oi latter, the inner plug end of each such connection having an external tapered surface and the outer socket en-d of each such connection making circular line contact with the tapered surface of the inner plug interiitting therewith to establish electrical contacts between the elements, at least one of the elements having a resilient and radially yieldable end for expansion and contraction thereof in permitting slight axial movement of one element relative to another while maintaining the line contact electrical connection, a iirst internally threaded sleeve embracing the threaded portion of one of the tubular conductors, a secon-d internally threaded sleeve embracing the threaded portion of the other tubular conductor, radial ange means on one of the sleeves engageable with the radial shoulder on said one conductor in axial bearing relation to locate the one sleeve in screwn ing the same onto the one conductor, and means interlocking the internally threaded sleeves to permit relative rotation thereorn in sc ewing the sleeves on the respective tubular conductors to draw the latter together axially and to hold the conductors assembled in said axially xed relation.

18. In combination in a coaxial line structure, a pair of substantially rigid tubular conductors disposable in end to end axially fixed relation and having Substantially smooth internal surfaces, a pair of central conductor elements disposed coaxially within the tubular conductors and aligned with one another, the confronting ends of the central conductor elements being axially spaced from one another and formed with substantially identical tapered surface portions, a conductive element disposed between the central conductor element ends and having substantially identical tapered surface portions on its ends for intertting with the central conductor element tapered end portions for permissive reversal of the conductive element in assembly,

21 the angle of the tapered portions on thev oonductor element ends differing from the angle of the tapered portions on the conductive element ends to provide substantially circular line contacts between the conductor elements and the conductive element, one of the elements being radially yieldable to permit expansion and contraction thereof upon relative axial movement of the yieldable element and another of the elements contacting such yieldable element to maintain said line contact therebetween in the form of a exible connection, the line contact moving along the tapered1 surface of the inner of the intertted elements during said relative axial movement,y and means engageable with external portions of the tubular conductors for drawing the latter together and holding them assembled said axially fixe-d relation, whereby axial shifting of one of the central conductor elements relative to the axially vfixed tubular conductors is accommodated in the iiexible connection.

19. In combination in a cc-axial line structure, pair of substantially rigid tubular outer conductors disposable in endv to end axially fixed relation and having substantially smooth internal surfaces, a pair of inner conductor elements disposed co-axially within the tubular conductors and aligned with one another, solid dielectric material substantially completely nlling the annular spaces between the tubular outer conductors and the respective inner conductor elements and serving to support the latter in the tubular conductors, the confronting ends of the inner conductor elements being axially spaced from one another and formed with substantially identical tapered surface portions, a conductive element disposed between the inner conductor element ends and having substantially identical tapered surface portions on its ends for interitting with the conductor element tapered end portions for permissive reversal of the conductive element in assembly, the angle of the tapered portions on the conductor element ends differing from the angle of the tapered portions on the conductive element ends to provide substantially line contact between the conductor elements and the conductive element, the solid dielectric material supporting each inner conductor extending axially along such supported conductor substantially to the plane of the circular line contact between such conductor and the connector element, one of the elements being radially yieldable to permit expansion and contraction thereof upon relative axial movement of the yieldable element and another of the elements contacting such yieldable element to maintain said line contact therebetween in the form of a flexible connection, the line contact moving along the tapered surface of the inner of the intertted elements during said relative axial movement, and means engageable with external portions of the tubular conductors for drawing the latter together and holding them assembled in said axially fixed relation, whereby axial shifting of one of the ccnductor elements relative to the axially xed tubular conductors is accommodated in the ilexible connection.

20. In combination in a co-axial electrical line structure, tubular outer conductors in end to end axially fixed relation, center conductor elements disposed in end to end relation, means supporting the center conductor elements within the tubular outer conductors in co-axial relation, the ends of the center conductor elements being of tubular form, opening toward one another and having confronting substantially circular substantially knife edges, and a connector element between the ends of the center conductor elements, said connector having tapered end portions located within the tubular ends of the conductor elements in interfitting relation, each knife edge making substantially circular line Contact with the connector element on one of the tapered end portions, one of the elements being radially yieldable to pei-.Wit expansion and contraction thereof upon rel v axial rnovenient of the yieldable element and another of the elements contacting such yieldable element to maintain said line contact therebetween in the form of a flexible connection, the line contact moving along the tapered surface of the inner of the interiitted elements during 'l relative axial movement whereby sli-. nig of one of the conductor eleine relative to the axially fixed tubular conductors is accommodated in the flexible connection.

21. In combination in a co-azrial electrical line structure, tubular outer cor rs in end to end axially fixed relation, cente conductor elements disposed in end to end lati n, means supporting the center conductor elements within the tubular outer conductors in .co-axial relation, the ends of the sente ments being in the form of re" axial slots opening' through the provision of ra tubes having confronting subst substantially knife edges comprising said fingers, and a connector element between the ends of the center conductor elements, said connector having tapered end portions located within the tubular ends of the conductor elements, the finger ends comprising each knife edge making substantially circular line contact with the connector element on one of he tapered end portions, the resilient tubes being adapted to expand and contract as the center conductor elements are moved axially toward and away from one another in assemblyand adjustment the provision of a flexible connection maintaining said circular line contacts at the knife edges, whereby axial shifting of one of the conductor elements relative to the axially fixed tubular conductors is accommodated in the flexible connection.

22. In a line coupling structure, a pair of substantialli7 rigid tubular conductors, sleeves ernbracing the conductors, the sleeves and conductors having intertting for tions for drawing the conductors into the sleeves upon relative rotation, a splice tube disposed between the ends of the conductors wholly within the axial lin/lits of the sleeves, pilot .means having a cylindrical surfaces at and embracing the splice tube ends and the ends of the conductors for guiding the parts together during assembly for holding the splice tube in predetermined oo-axial lation to each of the conductors, means resisting axial separation of the sleeves, said drawing of the conductors into the sleeves acting to cornpress the splice tube axially between the ends of the conductors, inner conductors extending axially through the outer conductors, bodies of solid insulating material embracing the inner conductors and supporting the saine in their respective outer conductors, a conductive connector element extending between the inner conductors, and another body of solid insulating nnterial einbracing the connector element and supporting the latter within the splice tube.

ular

23. In a co-axial line coupling structure an end fitting for a line cable having an inside conductor surrounded by and insulated from a braided tubular conductor, the end tting comprising an inner conductor for connection to one end of the inside conductor of the cable, an outer rigid conduotor of tubular form and circular cross section internally, an insulating body separating the fitting conductors and supporting the inner one 1o-axially within the outer conductor, one end of the outer conductor of the tting being formed to receive coupling means in assembling the end fitting in the coupling structure, the other end of the outer conductor of the fitting being formed with an internal cylindrical chamber and. a

`radially disposed circular shouldeiya clamping sleeve having one end for receiving and embracing the cable and another end receivable teleseopically over said other end oi the outer oon- -ductor, the sleeve having a substantially radialcircular opening at the sleeve shoulder of less '24 diameter than the cylindrical chamber and shoulder of the conductor so that the sleeve shoulder projects radially inwardly from the cylindrical Walls of the chamber in said other end. oi the outer conductor in the provision of a diameter increase in the plane of the transition.

JAMES` R. BIRD.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 514,734 Shields Feb. 13, 1894 699,455 Cronk May 5, 1902 739,707 Park Sept. 22,1903

1,841,473 Green Jan. 19, 1932 1,871,839 Carter Aug. 15, 1932 1,932,448 Clavier Oct. 31,1933

2,153,527 Battermann Apr. 4, 1939 2,294,738 Bruno Sept. 1, 1942 2,305,668 Bruno Dee. 22, 1942 2,332,529 Reppert Oct. 26, 1943 2,404,797 Hansen July 30, 1946 2,425,834 Salisbury Aug. 19, 1947 2,425,959 Schoenborn Aug. 19, 1947 2,443,921 Moe June 22, 1948 2,453,759 Robinson Nov. 16, 1948 2,497,922 Batt Feb. 21, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 50,021 Netherlands Oct. 15, 1940 485,409 France Oct. 12, 1917

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Classifications
U.S. Classification174/88.00C, 285/384, 439/374, 439/578
International ClassificationH01R13/646
Cooperative ClassificationH01R24/40, H01R2103/00
European ClassificationH01R24/40