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Publication numberUS2664162 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1953
Filing dateJun 24, 1948
Priority dateJun 24, 1948
Publication numberUS 2664162 A, US 2664162A, US-A-2664162, US2664162 A, US2664162A
InventorsHoward Kenneth C, Mcgowen Jr Harold E, Moore Jr Howard H
Original AssigneeSid W Richardson Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for installing and removing flow valves
US 2664162 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 29, 1953 K. c. HOWARD Er-AL 2,664,162

MEANS FOR INSTALLING AND REMovING FLow VALVES Filed June 24. 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS lll/lill. /l//ll/ll/ Hlll K.C.HOWARD H.E.McGOWE.N, Jn. H.H.MOORE, Jn.`

ATTORNEY Dec. 29, 1953 K. c. HOWARD ETAL MEANS FOR INSTALL-ING AND REMOVING FLOW VALVES 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 24. 1948 \\\\\\\\\\\""`Q @if 14.

K.C.HOWARD H.E.McGOWEN, Jn. H.H.MO0RE, Jn.

INVENTORS BW WWN ATTORNEY 2 N..m S m m 3 w Liv Mmmm o 6 7 R W m W mmm M m 2, m \\W|II|WUMW\\\TMM f A Dec 29, 1953 K c HOWARD ET A1.

MEANS FOR INSTALLING AND REMOVING FLOW VALVES Filed June 24. 1948 Patented Dec. 29, 1953 MEANS FOR INSTALLING AND REMOVING FLOW VALVES Kenneth C. Howard, Fort Worth, Tex., and Harold E. McGowen, Jr., and Howard H. Moore, Jr., Bunkie, La., assignors to Sid W. Richardson Inc., Fort Worth, Tex., a corporation of Texas Application June 24, 1948, Serial No. 34,954

(Cl. 16B-1) 8 Claims.

This invention relates to ilow valves for oil wells and has reference to a means for installing and removing valves and the like in a string of well tubing.

Flow valves in oil wells have delicate mechanisms and often require removal from the well for repairs or adjustments. Since these valves are attached to the Well tubing, it has been heretofore necessary to remove the entire string of tubing in order to make such repairs or adjustments, which removal operation was costly in that considerable time was expended during the removal operation.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a means for the installation and removal of flow valves without removing the well tubing to which said valves are attached during operation.

In accordance with our invention a ilow valve installing or removing tool, either with or without an attached flow valve, depending on whether the valve is to be installed in or removed from its seat, is lowered through a well tubing provided with a lateral oiset portion having an opening therein for the flow valve, the tool being lowered to the level of the offset portion and then dellected laterally by any suitable means into the offset portion of the tube, and the flow valve seated in the opening of the offset portion where the valve is being installed, or -the tool engaged with the valve where the valve is to be removed, after which the tool is rotated in one direction or the other to seat or remove the valve, following which seating or unseating step the tool, without the valve in the case of a valve installing operation, or with the valve attached in the case of a valve removing operation, is drawn up through the tubing to the surface of the ground.

The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings and the following detailed description.

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional View of a special ilow valve sub or section within a string of well tubing and showing a flow valve installed therein, together with an electrical tool for installing and removing the said valve.

Figure 2 is an enlarged elevational view of the tool illustrated in Figure 1, and showing the same in extended jarring position.

Figure 3 is an enlarged broken elevational view of the lower end of the tool illustrated in Figure 2, and particularly showing the electro-magnet, motor, and socket, and jar mechanisms of the tool.

Figure 4 is a lateral sectional view of the socket taken on lines4-i of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view of a modicd form of the invention wherein the low valve is installed for operation in alignment with the axis of the well tubing.

Figure 6 is an enlarged broken elevational View of the lower end of a tool, similar to the one illustrated in Figure 2, engaged on the upper end of the'valve illustrated in Figure 5.

Figures 7 and 8 are enlarged transverse sectional views taken on lines 'l-l and 8 8, respectively, oi Figure 5. s

Figure 9 is an enlarged broken sectional and elevational View of the lower end of the tool illustrated in Figure 6 and showing the same engaged on the adapter at the upper end of a oW valve, such as illustrated in Figure 5.

Figure 10 is a vertical sectional view of a ow valve sub, similar to the one illustrated in Figure l, and showing a mechanical means for shifting a tool for installing or removing a flow valve.

Figure 11 is an elevational and sectional view of the form o1" the invention illustrated in Figure 10 and showing the tool positioned for actuating a trigger of the mechanical shifting means illustrated in Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a transverse sectional view taken on lines l2|2 of Figure 11. y

Figures 13 and 14 are taken on lines iii-iii and l4-|4, respectively, of Figure 10.

Figure l5 is an enlarged broken and elevational view of the shifting mechanism illustrated in Figure 10, and showing one of the shifting arms in extended position.

Figure 16 is a transverse sectional view taken on lines Iii-I6 of Figure 15.

Figure 17 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of Figure 15 and showing the trigger mechanism for releasing one of the actuating arms and shifting the tool laterally with respect to the axis of the well tubing.

Figure 18 is an elevational and sectional view of the socket and ratchet mechanism which, during operation, is threadedly engaged in the lower end of the shifting mechanism illustrated in Figure 15.

Figure 19 is a transverse sectional view taken on lines |9-9 of Figure 18.

Figure 20 is a broken elevational view of the ratchet mechanism of the device illustrated in Figure 18.

Figure 21 is a plan View of a selector ring forming a part of the mechanism illustrated in Figure 20.

Figure 22 is an elevational View of an adapter to be secured at the upper ends of a conventional iiow valve whereby the various forms of the invention may be engaged by the tools herein l illustrated for installing and removing the said 1 includes a special valve sub or inserted .section of the well tubing I which'is downwardly and outwardly tapered along one side, as at 2, and which tapered portion is provided with' aV substantially horizontal bottom 3 having a downwardly and inwardly tapered and threaded hole 4 for threadedly engaging an adapter` 5- into which a conventional ow valve 6 is threaded.

In operation, the sub I is installed in a string of tubing 1 in a well, andit is to be understoodv that many sub units I and valvesV 6 are. employed for raising oil to the earths surface. The adapter 5 is provided with a central opening 8 for communicating the valve 6 with the interior of the sub I. A sectional view of the adapter 5 is illustrated in Figure 22.

Within the tapered side 2 of the sub I there is a multiple of spaced parallel splines 9 integral with the said side, as shown in Figure 24, and which splines are adapted to receivecorresponding splines I around the circumference. of an electric shifting tool II.

As shown in Figure 3, the upper end 0f the tool II is provided with a tubular jar I2 having an inwardly directed annular ange I3 at its lower end. The upper end of the jar I2 is secured to a cable I4 which is raised and lowered from above the earths surface. The cable I4 carries insulated wires I5 for operating an electromagnet I6 in the upper end of the tool II and a reversible motor I1 in the lower end of the tool.

The shifting tool II is slidably connected with the jar I2 by means of a mandrel I8 slidably extending into the said jar, which mandrel is provided with an outwardly directed annular ange I9 for engagement with the internal flange I3 of the jar I2. 'The electric wires I5 extend downwardly through the mandrel I8 and into the tool II where they are suitably connected with the magnet I6 and the motor I1. Since the wiring is a matter of conventional practica, the same is not herein described in detail.

The shaft of the motor I1`is disposed downwardly along the central axis. of the tool I1 and is provided with suitable bearings 2I at its lower end where it supports a pinion 22 for engagement with a planetary gear 23. Any suitable gear reduction mechanism may be employed and therefore the gear construction is not described in detail. The referred to gear arrangement 22, 23, drives a socket 24 rotatably mounted. in the lower end of the tool Il, and which socket is adapted to engage and frictionally secure the the upper end of the valve adapter 5. The referred to adapter includes vertical splines 25 along its outer surface, and which splines are notched, as at 26, near their upper end. Correspondingly, the socket24 is provided with vertical recesses 21 to receive the splines 25. of the adapter 5, and the said recesses are provided with springs 28, secured in the upper end of the socket 24 by a screw 24a, which springs are formed to engage the notches 26 in the adapter splines 25. A

plate of soft iron 29 is secured outwardly of the tapered portion 2 of the non-magnetic sub I whereby the tool I I may be moved toward the same when the electro-magnet I6 is energized. The bosses 30 around the upper end of the tool II are for aligning the tool whenr the latter is shifted against the tapered portion 2 of the sub I.

The operation of the described form of the invention is carried out by lowering the tool H downwardly through the tubing 1 and into the upper end of the sub I. By energizing the electro-magnet I6 as the tool approaches an expanded area the tool II is moved laterally toward the soft ironplate 29. r'he tool is then further lowered by the cable I 4, with the tool sliding against the-inner surface of the said inclined portion 2. When the splines I0, which are pointed at their ends, reach the internal splines 9, it may be necessary to jar the tool I I into place by raising and lowering the cable I4 and operating the jar mech-- anism I2 which coacts with the tool supporting mandrel I8. When the socket 24v at the lower end of the tool II rst contacts the upper ond of the adapter 5, it may be necessary to slightly rotate the said socket by actuating the motor I1 in order that the socket recesses 21 may properly receive the splines 25 on the valve adapter 5. By then energizing the motor, the adapter may be unscrewed from the bottom 3 of the inclined portion 2 of the sub I and by raising the cable I4 the valve 6, held by the springs 28 and the adapter 5, may be raised upwardly through the tubing 1 to the earths surface.

The valve 6 may be reinstalled by attaching the adapter 5 and valve 6 in the socket 24, where the springs 28 engage the recesses 26 in the adapter splines 25. The tool is then lowered into the sub I and the electro-magnet I6 is energized, causing the tool II to move laterally toward the soft iron plate 29. The tool I I is then lowered downwardly along the inside surface of the tapered portion 2 of the sub I where the splines I0 on the tool` I I engage the splines 9 in the said tapered portion. The motor I1 is then rotated in a direction to cause the adapter 5 to become threadedly engaged in the tapped hole 4 in the horizontal bottom 3 of the tapered portion 2 of the sub I.

The form of the invention illustrated Figures 5, 6, 78, and 23, is for the operation of a conventional flow valve 6 in axial alignment with the tubing 1. This form of the invention includes a straight tubular sub 3I for threaded engagement within a string of tubing and is providing with a bypass 32 around the installed said valve. The valve 6, which has an inlet 6a near its lower end, is provided with a sealing arrangement at its upper and lower ends, and which arrangement includes upper and lower packers 33 and 34, pairs of opposing conical slips.35 and 35 received within each end or" each of thesaid packers, and a slidable tubular spacer 3l between the inner slips 35 and 35. It will be noted in Figures 5 and 23 that the spacer 31, which is spaced from the valve 6, is provided with an opening 38 so as to provide for the passage of oil to the said valve. Similarly, the straight sub 3| is provided with a corresponding opening 39 for allowing oil outwardly of the sub 3! to reach the spacer opening 38.

The adapter 5a for'the last described form of the invention is similar to the previously described adapter 5 and has corresponding numbers for corresponding parts, but differs in that, threads are provided in the splines 25 andbelow the notches 26 in the said splines. The lower end of the adapter 5a threadedly receives thev conventional flow valve 6. An outwardly projecting dang-e lli is secured to the lower end of the valve so as to engage the outer face of the lowermost conical slip 35. Above the uppermost conical slip there is a nut 4! threadedly engaged on the adapter 5a.

The tool (Fig. 6) for installing the last described arrangement of valves and packers is similar to the one described for installing the rst described form of the invention, but is diferent in that the electromagnet I6 is eliminated, and the socket 43 extends downwardly below the springs 28 where it is shaped to receive and engage the nut 4l on the adapter 5a.

The last referred to tool 42 is provided with the previously described splines le around its surface which are adapted to engage splines 44 within the upper end of the tubular sub 3l.

The last described valve and packer arrangement is installed by detachably securing the upper end oi the adapter 5a in the springs 28 at the lower end of the tool 42. The arrangement is then lowered through the tubing l to a position within the tubular sub 3| and between the upper and lower internal openings in the bypass 32. The tool i2 is provided with a motor, not shown, similar to the one previously described, which motor may be rotated to draw the uppermost and lowerrnost conical slips 35 and 36 toward. each other. By reason of the spacer 31 around. the valve and between the intermediate slips 35 and 36 of the upper and lower packers 3S and 34, both of the said packers are caused to expand and locate the valve and packer assembly in the described position. By reason of the s ring engagement oi the tool socket 24, the tool 42 may be raised and released, leaving the valve assembly in place after the packers have been expanded to hold the valve in place. Similarly, the valve assembly may be removed by lowering the tool 42 into a position where the socket 24 and spring 25 engage the upper end of the adapter 39. By reversing the motor and loosening the conical slips 35 and 36, the valve may be raised upwardly through the tubing 'I to the earths surface.

The form ci the invention shown in Figure has to do with a mechanical means for shifting a tool assembly laterally of the central axis o the tubing 'a' for installing and removing a valve 6 in a manner similar to the first described form or the invention. The present form includes a jar 45 secured to the lower end of the cable I4. Beneath the jar 45 there is a shifting mechanism 4G which is slidably and extensibly connected with the said jar by means oi linking arms 4'! joined at their upper ends where they are inter-connected in the manner of a chain with similar joined depending arms 4S at the lower end of the jar 45. The body of the shifting tool d, which is substantially cylindrical in shape, is provided with multiple longitudinal flutes 49 which receive shifting arms 59 (see Figure which are pivotally secured at their upper ends and within the upper ends of the ilutes 4Q. Within each flute 49 and near the upper end thereof, there is an outwardly extending spring 5| for moving each arm B outwardly. The lower end of each arm 50 is provided with a downwardly and inwardly directed arcuate spring 52 which in closed position is received within the lower end of the iiute 49. The lower end oi the arm 55, above the last described spring 52, is provided with an inwardly and upwardly directed integral hook 53 for coaction with a trigger mechanism, shown in detail in Figure 17, comprised of a latch 54 pivotally mounted at its center with in an opening 55 in the body of the 'shifting tool 46. Transverse pins 55 through the said body pivotally support the latches 54. One end of each latch 54 is provided with 'a hook 5l adapted to engage the arm hook 53. The end of each latch 54 opposite its hook 51 is operated by a trigger 58 which is pivotaily secured at one end on pins 59 horizontally positioned through the body of the shifting tool 45. Each trigger 58 has a notched recess 60 adapted to engage the end of the latch 54 opposite its hook 5l when the trigger 58 is in its down position and the latch is in its raised position, as shown by dotted lines in Figure 17 and in full lines in Fig. l5. rIhe upper central edge of each latch 54 is provided with a spring 5| which bears against the edge of the trigger 58 opposite the trigger notch 60.

Beneath the shifting mechanism 46, and threadedly secured thereto, there is a ratchet operated socket assembly l, illustrated in Figures 18 through 2l, which includes a tubular body 62 having the previously described splines I therearound, and threads 63 at its upper end to engage internal threads 54 in the lower end of the shifting mechanism 45. The axial center of the body 62 is cylindrically hollow, as at 65, where it receives the flanged upper end 66 of a helcally luted mandrel 5l. The lower end of the cylindrical cavity 65 is provided with an inwardly positioned annular shoulder to engage the ange 66. The lower end of the body 55 is counterbored to receive a ratchet collar S9 having square teeth l0 around its upper periphery. The ratchet collar 89 is retained by a ferrule 'El threadedly engaged on the lower end of the body 52. rThe outer lower surface of the body 52 is recessed to receive a rotatable selector ring l2 which is also held in place by the ferrule ll. As particularly shown in Figures 19 and 21, the selector ring l2 is provided with inwardly projecting pins 'i3 which pass inwardly through horizontal slots 'i4 in the body 62 .where they selectively and tiltably position a pawl l5 (Fig. 20) which is adapted to engage the teeth i0 or the collar 69 at one end thereof and to bear against an end of the horizontal slot '14 in the body 62 at the other end of the pawl. The pawl 'I5 is retained against lateral displacement by the outer surface of the mandrel 5?, and the inner surface of the body shoulder 63. The ratchet collar 69 is provided with integral inwardly directed projections 'i6 which engage the spiraled grooves il in the surface of the mandrel 61. Thus, the position of the pawl 15, which may be tilted in either direction by means of the selector ring l2, controls the direction of rotation of the mandrel El when the body t2 is reciprocated. The lower end of the mandrel El' is provided with a socket '18, welded or otherwise secured thereto, having flutes i9 therein and a transversely disposed ring loosely mounted in an annular groove 8l in the said socket. The purpose of the ring is to frictionally engage the notches 26 in the adapter 5, whereas the last referred to flutes i9 are adapted to engage the splines 25 in the said adapter.

Referring now to Figures 10 and 11, the last described form of the invention is provided with a sub 82 having an outwardly tapered wall along one side, as at 83, and a substantially horizontal bottom 84 at the lower end of the latter. Tubing 1 is threadedly engaged in the upper and lower ends of the sub 82. Near the upper end of the sub 82 and above the outwardly projecting wall there is a recess 85 having an inwardly directed 58 of the mechanical shifting tocld.

tached to the lower end thereof.

The operation of the last describedformof: the invention is as follows: the shifting'mechanism 46 and its attached assemblies are. lowered through the tubing l to a level where one ofthe triggers E8 is moved outwardly, by reasonlof the spring SI, and into the subv recess 85. See Figure 11. By raising the cable slightly, the trigger 58 is moved relatively downward and thus releases. the opposing shifting arm 5U, causing the shifting.v

mechanism and the attached ratchet tool E2 to move against the inner wall of the tapered por-l tion 83 of the sub 82. The assembly is then-,further lowered, whereupon .the splines l0 ofi'thetool 62 engage internal splines 8l in theztapered portion of the sub 82. See Figure 13. Asshown in Figure 19, the last referred to splinesi'l` are relatively long to accommodate a reciprocalrnovez-V ment imparted to the tool 62 which'is carried out4 by means of the cable i4 and the jar assembly 47 and 43. "l2, the socket "i8 may be rotated in either direction for installing and removing the adapter 5A and its attached now valve 5. rThe direction of, rotation is determined above the ground beforev inserting the assembly in the Well. When withdrawing the assembly, the pivot acticnof.' the.

trigger 5S assumes the downward position illus# trated by dotted lines in Figurev 17 The described form of the invention is vnotrestrictve, but may be made in manyfwayswithin.

the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a well tubing fhavingza. vertical main bore, said tubing including one.or.

more now valve receiving sections each having a portion laterally oiset from the vertical main bore and provided with a flow valve seat in theoffset.

portion, and means, including a shifting tool adapted to be lowered from the topof the .tubing to the level of a selected section, for selectively seating or removing a flow valve in or from'V its seat within a selected receivingsection, said shifting tool being provided with means formoving-` said tool and its appendages laterallywithinithel offset portion of the selected section.

2. The combination as set forth in. claim 1'. wherein the shifting tool is provided,V with re- By selectively setting the selectorring 8# versibletrotarymeansfor engaging and rotating a-,fl'owivalvein setting or removing thesame.

3. The combination as set forthin claim 2 wherein the reversible rotary meanscomprises a ratchet operated socket assembly.`

4'. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein a jar is operatively connected with the shifting tool.

5. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein the laterally off-set portion of each flow valve receiving section is provided with substantially vertical parallel guideflanges adapted to coact with splines carried by the shifting tool.

6. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein a flow Valve seat is formed in a dat base portion of each of theA flow valve` receiving., sections.

7.,'Ihe combination as set forth in claim 6 wherein the ow valve seat is tapered and threaded to receive a correspondingly formed flow valve adapter.

8. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein a ilow valve adapter is removably mounted in the ow valve seat, and a flow valve is carried by the adapterbelow the level of the seat, said adapterv being provided with a central passage connecting the interior of the flow valve with the interior of the receiving section.

KENNETH C. HOWARD.

HAROLD E. MCGOVVEN,.JR. HOWARD H. MOORE, JR.

References Cited in the le of thispatent UNITED'STATES PATENTS Number Name Date' 672,097 Eastman Apr. 16, 1901 919,792 Stubler Apr. 27, 1909 1,421,629 Watkins July 4, 1922 1,527,412 Hinderliter Feb. 24, 1925 1,717,497 Davis June 18, 1929 2,061,316 Brack Nov. 17, 1936 2,230,107 Garrett Jan. 23, 1941 2,266,344 Staerker Dec. 16, 1941 2,346,248 Brauer Apr. 1l, 1944 2,380,669 Mowrey July 31, 1945 2,401,119 Taylor May 28, 1946 2,447,546 Spencer Aug. 24, 1948 2,452,920 Gilbert Nov. 2, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 309,616 Germany. of.19l8.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/109, 166/117.5, 137/155, 166/66.4, 417/313, 137/215, 417/454
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/03
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/03
European ClassificationE21B23/03