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Publication numberUS2664929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1954
Filing dateMar 17, 1953
Priority dateMar 17, 1953
Publication numberUS 2664929 A, US 2664929A, US-A-2664929, US2664929 A, US2664929A
InventorsAllan Simons Howard
Original AssigneeAllan Simons Howard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic log-barker having logholddown rollers and confronting rotary spray heads
US 2664929 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1954 H. A. SIMONS. 2,664,

HYDRAULIC LOG-BARKER HAVING LOG-HOLDDOWN ROLLERS AND CONFRONTING ROTARY SPRAY HEADS Filed March 17, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet l nun nu INVIN UR HOWARD ALMA! SIHONS iwm Jan. 5, 1954 H. A. SIMONS 2,664,929

HYDRAULIC LOG-BARKER HAVING LOG-HOLDDOWN ROLLERS AND CONFRQNTING ROTARY SPRAY HEADS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 17, 1953 I02. I36 I6 M.

mvnnun HOWAM ALLAN SIM Jan. 5, 1954 H. A. SIMONS 2,664,929

. HYDRAULIC LOG-BARKER HAVING LOG-HOLDDOWN ROLLERS AND CONFRONTING ROTARY SPRAY HEADS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 17, 1953 INVENTOl HOWARD ALLAN SIMONS .26- ATIDRNIVS Patented Jan. 5, 1954 HYDRAULIC LOG-BARKER HAVING LOG- HOLDDOWN ROLLERS AND ICONFRONT- ING ROTARY SPRAY-HEADS Howard Allan Simons, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Application March 17, 1953, Serial No. 342,867

17 Claims. 1

This invention generally relates to a device for removing bark from logs by feeding the logs past jets of water under high pressure. Such devices are termed hydraulic barkers and this term will be used herein. More specifically, the invention relates to a hydraulic barker especially designed for the treatment of small logs, by which I mean a log having a diameter of about one and a half feet or less, and a length of about six feet or less.

The debarking of small logs presents a special problem since the small logs lack the inertia which is relied upon in the case of larger logs to steady them against the rolling and tilting tendencies applied thereto by the impingement of the high pressure jets. The conveying and supporting mechanism which carries the logs past the water jets must, of course, be able to accommodate logs of widely differing diameters, just as in the case of larger log barkers, but this common problem is aggravated in the case of small 10g barkers by the greater need to steady these logs against the forces of the jets. Since the small logs must be debarked at high speeds, if the barker is to be commercially attractive, and since a log of, say, 18 inch diameter may be immediately followed by a log of appreciably smaller diameter, yet each log must be securely steadied against rolling or tilting as it is carried past the high pressure jets, it can readily be seen that severe demands are made upon the small log barker. The demands are, in fact, so severe that, as far as I am aware, no small log hydraulic barker has found any significant market in industry.

I have devised a barker for small logs which is fully satisfactory in that it conveys logs past the jets at high speeds, adequately steadies the logs as they are carried past the jets, and automatically adjusts itself to accommodate logs of greatly different diameters fed thereto in immediate succession. My new barker may be generally defined as comprising a main frame, two axially aligned oppositely disposed rotary spray heads facing each other and spaced apart a distance sli htly greater than the diameter of the largest leg for which the apparatus is designed, means for feeding water under pressure to said spray heads, means for rotating said spray heads at high speeds, a pair of horizontally aligned rollers rotatably mounted in said main frame and disposed on opposite sides of said spray heads with their of rotation parallel, an ingoing conveyor leading to one of said rollers, anoutgoing conveyor leading from the other of said rollers, a

third roller rotatably mounted above the roller.

adjacent the ingoing conveyor with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter roller, .a log advancing ,means vertically swingably mounted in said'main frame above the ingoing conveyor, said third roller being mounted for generally vertical movement in sympathy with the swinging of said -log advancing means, and a fourth roller rotatably mounted above the roller adjacent the outgoing conveyor with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter roller, said fourth roller being mounted for verticalswinging to accommodate logs of different diameter. Preferably, a fifth roller is rotatably mounted above said outgoing conveyor and is suspended from the main frame for vertical swinging to accommodate logs of varying diameters.

It will be seen that with the arrangement de scribed there are two horizontally spaced pairs of vertically spaced rollers which grip the log from above and below and steady it as it is car- .ried past the spray. heads; and a single roller (the fifthroller) which bears against the upper forward surface ofa log and steadies the log when the after end thereof has cleared the first vertical pair of rollers but is still being acted upon by the sprays. The log advancing means, in additionto its main functionof advancing the log, plays va role comparable to that of said fifth roller, in that it bears against the upper surface of the after end of a log when its forward end has passed through the first vertical pair of rollers (and is being debarked) but has not as yet been received by the second vertical pair of rollers.

At the risk of stating the obvious, to avoid any possibility ofa misunderstanding, I would like to point out that the first vertical pair of rollers consists of the rollers which, in the preceding statement of invention, are termed the thirdroller and ,the roller adjacent the ingoing conveyor; whereas the second vertical pair consists of the fourth roller and the roller adjacent the outgoing conveyor.

The log advancing means drives the logs through the two'pairs of roller. All the rollers may be idly mounted except the upper roller of the second vertical pair, which is driven to assure feeding of the debarked logonto the outgoing conveyor. ihe weight of the three upper rollers is relied upon to hold the logs without resort (at least in mypresently preferred embodiment of the invention) to any auxiliary meansfordownwardly biasing these rollers; and for this reason these rollers should be of appreciable Weight.

-.I will nowillustrate my invention by describing O the presently preferred embodiment thereof with the of drawings illustrating this embodiment. In these drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the apparatus with the hood removed;

Figure 2 is a section on the line 22 in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 33 in Figure 1;

Figure i is a section on the line 44 in Figure 1 Figure 5 is a fragmentary side elevation of lifting mechanism for the fourth roller, as seen from the right hand side of Fig. 4; and

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic side elevation showing log entering barking area of the apparatus.

In the drawings, reference character A generally indicates the main frame of the machine. This main frame A basically consists of four vertical columns in the form of H-columns II], ll, [2 and i3 mounted on bases and connected by an upper bridge 13 and a lower bridge C, and by suitable cross members and bracing members. There are two axially aligned, oppositely disposed rotary spray heads. These spray heads are arranged vertically one above the other, and the upper spray head has been labeled [4, while numeral I 5 has been applied to the lower spray head. Sprays heads l and 15 are carried by vertically aligned shafts i6 and I1, respectively. Shaft i6 is rotatably mounted in bearings (not shown) mounted within a housing [8 carried by the main frame. Shaft it has a pulley at its upper end, which is driven by an electric motor 21 through a belt 22. shaft is is hollow, and water under pressure may be fed along the shaft to the rotary spray head i4, after entering the shaft through the inlet labelled 23. The arrangement of shaft I1 is similar to that of shaft [6. Shaft H is carried by two bearings mounted within a housing 24, and has a pulley 26 driven by electric motor 2! through a belt 28. Shaft I1 is hollow and water under pressure may be fed through an inlet 23a to the interior of the hollow shaft and therealong to the rotary spray head IS. The rotary spray heads 14 and I5 face one another, and are spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the largest log for Which the machine is designed.

The motors 2! and 21 should be capable of driving the shafts I6 and H at speeds of about 6G0 R. P. M., and I have found 20 H. P. motors suitable.

Two horizontally aligned rollers 29 and 30 are disposed above and on opposite sides of spray head 15. These rollers 29 and 30 are rotatably mounted in the main frame, with their axes of rotation parallel. A horizontal conveyor 3| leads to roller 29. This conveyor may be of any designed construction. In this example, the conveyor consists of a pair of chains 32 extending around sprockets with transverse saddles 33 carried thereby. The conveyor may terminate short of roller 29, or, as shown, said roler may have cog teeth thereon around which the conveyor chains extend. Conveyor 3| is designed to deliver logs to the apparatus, and will therefore henceforth be termed the ingoing conveyor. A second similar conveyor, which has been labeled 35, leads from or includes roller 36 to carry debarked logs away from the apparatus, and will therefore henceforth be termed the outgoing conveyor.

A third roller 38 is rotatably mounted above the roller 29 with its axis of rotation parallel to that of roller 29. A log-advancing means generally indicated by numeral 56 is vertically swingably mounted in the main frame at a point above the ingoing conveyor. The nature of the log-advancing means and the manner in which it is mounted will be described in greater detail later on in this specification. Roller 38 is mounted for generally vertical movement in sympathy with the swinging of log-advancing means 46. Details of the mounting of this roller will also be given later on in the specification.

A fourth roller 42 is rotatably mounted above roller 30, with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter roller. Roller 42 is also vertically swingable, to accommodate logs of differing diameter, and the mounting of this roller and the provisions made for causing the roller to accommodate the log will also be described in detail later on herein.

A fifth roller, which has been labeled 44, is rotatably mounted above the outgoing conveyor 35. The shaft of roller 44 is rotatably mounted in arms 45 and 46, which depend from the frame A and are pivotally connected thereto, as indicated at 41 in Figure 2. Due to this suspension of roller 44, it will be realized that as a log emerges from between the rollers 30 and 42 and is received on the outgoing conveyor 35, the forward end of the log will contact roller 44 and cause this roller to swing upwardly and away from the pair of rollers 30 and 42, permitting the log to pass under roller 44 and along the conveyor 35. At the same time, the full weight of roller 44 will bear upon the log holding it down on conveyor 35, and preventing tipping thereof, despite the fact that the spray heads will be directing water under high pressure on to the end of the log while it is still held between rollers 30 and 42, but has been released by rollers 29 and 38.

The structure of, and the means for mounting the log-advancing means will now be described in greater detail. A shaft extends transversely across the frame A of the machine in parallel relation with the five rollers described, and is freely rotatably mounted in pillow blocks 5! and 52 bolted to the frame, as best seen in Figure l. The shaft 50 is provided at one of its ends with a sprocket 53, whereby the shaft may be driven through a chain drive 55 connected with the mechanism (not shown) employed for driving the ingoing conveyor 3! or to any other suitable source of power. The log-advancing means proper consists of a frame work 58, an idler sprocket 59, a driven sprocket 68 (best seen in Figure 3), and a plurality of endless chains 62 trained over the sprockets 59 and 6E. The driven sprocket 60 is keyed to the driven shaft 50, as indicated at 64 in Figure 3. Each of the chains 62 is provided with a plurality of log gripping spars 65. The framework 58 of the log-advancing means 40 is rigidly secured to bearings 68, both of which are shown in Figures 1 and 3, and one of which is visible in Figure 2. These bearings 68 are freely mounted on the shaft 50, so that they, in effect, pivotally mount the log-advancing means with respect to the shaft 50, and rotation of this shaft has no effect upon the framework '58. A pair of lugs 10 extend upwardly from the framework 58 and are connected by a rod H. A cushioning air cylinder 13 is mounted on the main frame A above the log-advancing means, and a rod 14, constituting the piston rod of the piston thereof, is pivotally connected at its lower end to the rod 1 l. A second pair of lugs 16 are rigidly attached ana gesia s tothe bearings ts which, as previously mentioned, pivctally-mount the log-advancingmeans. Lugs TS-are bifurcated attheir-upper ends, and a pin T7 is-mounted in the -bifu-rcatedportions and *extends transversely thereacross. The purposef these lugs andpins will be-explained hereinafter.

Asa log is carried along conveyor 31 Tasterwardend is gripped byspur-s 66 on the ch-ains '62 and thereby positi-vely f forced *towards the rollers isand -38. Ihe leg-advancing -means mowill be raised by the log to varying degrees depending upon its diameter, the -"f-rame 58 pivoting about -the-shaft--'50. Asthe log-advarrcing-means 40 is raised -by the lo'g, piston connecting :rod 4 rises in cushioning cylinder "It displacing -=ai-r therein so that when the afterend of the log-clears "the inner end otleg-advancing means-4'0,- the l-atter does not drop suddenly towards its *initial position, but rather has a cushioned descent controlled by the piston rod H.

Roller =38 'moves insympathy with thelog-advancing means due to the arrangement ofparts whichwill=now be---described. *Roller38 is rotatably 'mounted between two parallel arms 80 and-S"! best seen in Figure =1. 'Theends of arms tit and '8! are rigidly secured to'trunnions 82 and -83,'resp'ectively. Trunnion 82 is -rotatabl-y mounted in a pillow block-8s secured to column II and trunnion "83 is rotatably mounted in a pillow block 85 secured to "column 1-2. "Lugs-$8 extend upwardly from arms =88 "and ill at *oppositely disposed points intermediate the roller 38 andthe trunnions. Link'arm-s im '(of adjustable 'length, as indicated'at" 9 I) connect the lugs 88 on the roller-supporting arms 80 and 8! to 'thelugs on the bearings "68 -0f -the -'log-ad vancin-g means l'fl. "One end o'feaehlink arm 90 is connectedto'each lug--88- througha simple pivotal connectionQbut the connection of the'epposite ends of thearmstothe ls ifurcated lugs"-"It is-somewhatmore ccmplicatedgs'ince it is desired "to provide -a 10st -=moticn -at this point, -w'hereby the log-advancing means da after lifting roller 3B to accommodate one log, can drop toeng-a-ge the next log brought up by conveyor 3|,=despite the fact that the preceding log is still under roller To this -end,=eac'h link =arrn=90is provided with-an elon-gated slot 93 (see Figure 2) and the pins Ii, which passthroughthe-"bifurcated ears of the lugslfi, rideinthe-slotseii. Relative sliding of the pins andslots gives the-desired loist motion permitting limited independentmovement of the roller and log-advancing-means4'0.

The mounting of roller will now be described with particular reference to :Figures 1, 4and'5.

Roller 42 is rigidly secured to -a shaft 9.5, and shaftSE is rotatablymounted in bearings 6 attached to the ends of two roller-supporting arms 9! and '88. Roller supporting arm '91 is freely mounted (asshownatSQ) on-a horizontally disposed shaft I 02 which is rotatably;mounted (in parallel relation to roller "42) in bearings -'I-ii'3--and I secured to'crcss members of the frame A. Roller supporting arm "98 is keyed to a tubular sleeve its as indicated-at I01. IE5 is. horizontally disposed in axial alignment with-shaft IfiiZ-an'd i-s-rotatably"mountedinbearin'gs- IDS-and -I' ii) securedto 'crossmembers" of the frame Thereducedtend I I2 ofshaftlfi! and a'shaft I it, the latter being rotatably rmounted within sleeve I 66, carry cranked arms H5 and I it which carry a feeler plate in, holding :this-plate in irontof'roller "42 withthelcwer,edge'of the-- plate lying below-'the 'axispf-the roller. -Cranked arm Tubular sleeve :42 Ito be raised the required distance. the second logj-ibe of lesser diameter'than the first,

. '6 14B *iS keyed =t0 Shaft I F3 als indicated at H3.

Shaft 'I-t3,-=at "its outer end, carries an eccentric P20. A- servo piston cylinder i I 222 is pivotally connected =at its lower end to the outer end of an arm I'-2-3 which is-connected to and projects from the sleeve I06. A piston rod I24 extends upwardly from the cylinderand is pivotally connected to the column I O at I25. The operating mechanism 12'! of the servo piston is connected by a link 128 to'the eccentric 123. An adjustable -stop member I30, attached to a member I3I rigidly secured atitsopposite ends to the arms 9-! and '$I8, is loca;ted between roller 742 and feeler plate H1, and-this sto member imposes a limit iupon movement of the plate I I1 towards said roller 42. When a log being advanced through the apparatusiisof sufficient diameter to contact feeler plate I ll, the plate is moved upwardlywand to the left (as viewedainiFigure 2) carrying arms H5 and -'I it in aclockwise direction. Arm I I6 turns shaft III 3 i and eccentric I 29, thereby actuating the operating mechanism I2] ofservopis- "ton I 22 through link I28. This servo piston is suchpthatzaslongas the feeler plate is moving sleeve I06 which, in=-turn, swings the supporting arm 98'to lift roller 42. Consequently, theroller is lifted by the servo piston as long as the: feeler .plateis swung upwardly. Actually, the roller is raised-sufficientlyto permitjthe log to engage it below thehorizontal axis thereof. -Further-movement of the 510g raises the-rolleronto its upper :surfaceyat which-time the feeler plate is free ofjthe logiand can pivot-towardsits normal position. :If -a log of'largerdiameter than the first .onepimmediately follows the latter, the second log will engage the feeler plate to cause the roller Should .thewroller willmerely'dropon to said second log. The raising'of roller t2 toaccommodate a log of such small diameter that it strikes the roller at a point substantially "below its axis of rotation is a relatively simple matter. In such a case, 'feeler plate III iis not actuated, and roller c2, upon beingstruck byzthe 110g, swings upwardly andoutwardly, carrying rollersupporting arms'tl' 'and' 98 in a clockwisesdirection (as viewed in Figure' 2), arm 91 turning ireely on the shaft I92,

and arm 98 carrying sleeve I06 around with it.

'Whileit is preferred to have the feeler plate "and its associated mechanism included in the apparatus, it is possible to'omit them. In this case, the roller '42 would be subjected to considerable abuse, or the maximum size of logs that niightbe h'andlied would be reduced.

its previously mentioned, roller t2 is positively driven. This is accomplished as'follows. Shaft 50, driven by'chain drive and sprocket 53,

carries=a-secondsprocket-I32 which is mounted on =the-shaft at a point adjacent sprocket '53. Shaft 'III'Z carries=asprocket I33'at its outer end, and a chain Ki l istrained over sprockets I32 and 133. Shaft 'llllatits inner end, carries a sprocket I36; -and the shaft which carries roller i2 'is provided with a sprocket I-3'I. A chain 139 is trained over sprockets I36 and I31. With this driving arrangement, the drive mechanism for the ingoing conveyor, through chain 55, drives not only the log-advancing mechanism 40, but also the roller 42 (through intermediate chains [34 and I39).

In the event that a log of a diameter greater than the 18 inch maximum for which the machine is designed should be fed towards the log-advancing means 40, a trigger plate 143, positioned above the ingoing conveyor 3i, will be tripped by the large diameter log. Movement of this. trigger plate actuates a suitable mechanism (not shown) which breaks the electric circuit of the motor driving the ingoing conveyor. The too-large log may then be removed, after which the trigger plate swings back to its normal position so that operations may be resumed.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A hydraulic barker for small logs comprising a main frame, two axially aligned oppositely disposed rotary spray heads facing each other and spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the largest log for which the apparatus is designed, means for feeding water under pressure to said spray heads, means for rotating said spray heads at high speeds, a pair of horizontally aligned rollers rotatably mounted in said main frame and disposed on opposite sides of said spray heads with their axes of rotation parallel, an ingoing conveyor leading to one of said rollers, an outgoing conveyor leading from the other of said rollers, a third roller rotatably mounted above the roller adjacent the ingoing conveyor with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter roller, a log-advancing means vertically swingably mounted in said main frame above the ingoing conveyor, said third roller being mounted for generally vertical movement in sympathy with the swinging of said log-advancing means, and a fourth roller rotatably mounted above the roller adjacent the outgoing conveyor with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter roller, said fourth roller being mounted for vertical swinging to accommodate logs of different diameter.

2. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a fifth rotatably mounted roller is vertically swingably suspended from said main frame at a point above said outgoing conveyor.

3. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which said fourth roller is positively driven and the remainder of said rollers are idly mounted.

4. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a fifth rotatably mounted roller is swingably suspended from said main frame above said outgoing conveyor, and in which said fourth roller is positively driven, and the remainder of said rollers are idly mounted.

5. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, and means for cushioning the vertical swinging of the lg-advancing means.

6. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a driven shaft is rotatably mounted in said main frame above said ingoing conveyor and one end of said log-advancing means is pivotally mounted on said shaft.

'7. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a feeler member is pivotally mounted in front of said fourth roller and depends to a point below the axis of said roller, said feeler member being operatively connected to a mechanism arranged to raise said roller when said member is pivoted by the forward end of a log being fed through the apparatus.

8. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a driven shaft is rotatably mounted in said main frame above said ingoing conveyor, in which said log-advancing means includes a framework, an idling sprocket, a driven sprocket, and a plurality of endless chains trained over said sprockets, said driven sprocket being secured to said driven shaft, said chains each being provided with a plurality of log-gripping spurs, and in which a drive connection is provided between said fourth roller and said driven shaft whereby said fourth roller rotates whenever said shaft is driven.

9. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 1, in which a driven shaft is rotatably mounted in said main frame above said ingoing conveyor, and in which said log-advancing means includes a framework, an idling sprocket, a driven sprocket, and a plurality of endless chains trained over said sprockets, said driven sprocket being secured to said driven shaft, said chains each being provided with a plurality of loggripping spurs.

10. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 9, in which said third roller is carried in a pair of arms pivotally mounted in said frame, and in which link arms, pivotally connected to said roller carrying arms at points intermediate the third roller and pivotal axis of the arms, are pivotally connected to the framework of said log-advancing means.

11. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 10, in which said link arms are adjustable in length.

12. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 10, in which a measure of lost motion is provided for in the pivotal connection between said link arms and said framework of the log-advancing means.

13. A hydraulic barker as defined in claim 12, in which lugs, extending upwardly from said framework, carry pins which are parallel to the axes of said rollers, and in which each link arm is provided with an elongated slot extending generally longitudinally therein, said pins passing through said slots to give said pivotal connection and being slidable in said slots to give said lost motion.

14. A hydraulic barker for small logs comprising a main frame, two axially aligned oppositely disposed rotary spray heads facing each other and spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the largest log for which the apparatus is designed, means for feeding water under pressure to said spray heads, means for rotating said spray heads at high speeds, infecd and outfeed aligned rollers rotatably mounted in said main frame and disposed on opposite sides of said spray heads with their axes of rotation parallel, a third roller rotatably mounted above the infeed roller with its axis of rotation parallel to that of the latter, and a fourth roller rotatably mounted above the outfeed roller with its axis of rotation parallel with those of the other rollers, said third and fourth rollers being mounted for vertical swinging to accommodate logs of different diameter, and being adapted to steady logs moving through high pressure spray from the rotating heads.

15. A hydraulic barker as claimed in claim 14 in which the fourth roller is positively driven, and including means for positively moving each log between the third and infeed rollers until it is between the fourth and outfeed rollers.

16. A hydraulic barker as claimed in claim 14 in which a feeler member is movably positioned in front of the fourth roller and extends below the axis thereof, said feeler member being operatively connected to a mechanism arranged to raise said roller when the member is moved by the forward end of a log being fed through the apparatus.

17. A hydraulic barker as claimed in claim 14 including a feeler plate hingedly suspended in front of the fourth roller and depending to a point below the axis theerof, a hydraulic cylinder operatively connected to said roller for swinging the latter upwardly, and control means for the cylinder operatively connected to the feeler plate, whereby movement of the plate by the forward end of a log being fed through the apparatus it) operates the control means to cause the cylinder to raise the fourth roller until said plate swings back to its normal position.

HOWARD ALLAN SIMONS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 10 2,501,848 Johnson Mar. 28, 1950 2,578,804 Holveck Dec. 18, 1951 2,643,691 Rockwood June 30, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501848 *Apr 10, 1946Mar 28, 1950Rayonier IncLog barker having water-jets oscillatable about longitudinal log axis
US2578804 *Apr 30, 1946Dec 18, 1951Worthington Pump & Mach CorpHydraulic-type log debarker having centripetally directed jets mounted in circumferential groups radially adjustable for different size logs
US2643691 *Apr 9, 1952Jun 30, 1953Worthington CorpHydraulic log debarker
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738814 *Oct 20, 1954Mar 20, 1956Jackson Ind IncHydraulic slab debarker
US2966914 *Nov 19, 1958Jan 3, 1961Ind Washing Machine CorpAutomatic cleaning and drying machine
US3123113 *Apr 2, 1959Mar 3, 1964The Bauer Broshorstman
US4821754 *May 24, 1984Apr 18, 1989David R. Webb Co., Inc.Flitch washer
US5220935 *Dec 28, 1990Jun 22, 1993Carolina Equipment & Supply Co., Inc.Apparatus and method for cleaning with a focused fluid stream
US5263504 *Apr 16, 1993Nov 23, 1993Carolina Equipment And Supply Company, Inc.Apparatus and method for cleaning with a focused fluid stream
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/208.3, 134/46, 134/122.00R, 134/181, 134/48, 134/144
International ClassificationB27L1/00, B27L1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB27L1/14
European ClassificationB27L1/14