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Publication numberUS2665042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1954
Filing dateOct 30, 1951
Priority dateOct 30, 1951
Publication numberUS 2665042 A, US 2665042A, US-A-2665042, US2665042 A, US2665042A
InventorsStarolis Agatha H
Original AssigneeStarolis Agatha H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger ring protector
US 2665042 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E, 5 1954 A. H. STAROLJS 2,665,042

FINGER RING PROTECTOR IN V EN TOR.

l ATTORNEYS AGATHA H. STAPous Patented Jan. 5, 1954 UNITED STAT PATENT OFFICE FINGER RING PROTECTOR Agatha H. Starolis, San Francisco, Calif.

Application October 30, 1951, Serial No. 253,920

3 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to improvements in a finger ring protector. It consists of the combinations, constructions, and arrangement of parts, as hereinafter described and claimed.

It is a well-known fact that many people, when washing their hands, or performing arduous tasks, remove their finger rings in order to preclude the latter from becoming soiled or abraded. This often leads to the rings being misplaced, and, indeed, often lost.

Accordingly, the cardinal object of this invention is to provide a finger ring protector, which may be secured to an individual, for instance around the wrist or neck, to which the ring may be removably attached. Thus, in the event that a person forgets about the ring, for example after washing the hands, the ring will not be left hehind.

Moreover, the ring protector may be worn by a person, such as a factory employee, while working for a considerable length of time. It affords protection against misplacement, or insecurity, of leaving finger rings in a pocket, or a pocketbook, especially when the latter is left out of sight of the owner. It provides security for the rings of factory workers, waitresses, travellers, etc. Many other uses for my finger ring protector will be pointed out as the specification proceeds.

Other objects and advantages will be mentioned in detail, and the novel features of the invention will be set forth in the claims hereunto appended.

Drawings For a better understanding of my invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drawing, forming part of this application, in which:

Figure 1 is an enlarged elevational View of my finger ring protector in detached position;

Figure 2 is a similar View, with the flexible securing member formed into a loop, and further showing a finger ring supported on a hook of the protector; and

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view, which corresponds to a portion of Figure 2, but disclosing the parts arranged to guard against accidental displacement of the finger ring from the supporting hook.

While I have shown only the preferred form of my invention, it should be understood that various changes, or modifications, may be made within the scope of the annexed claims without departing from the spirit thereof.

Detailed description Referring now to the drawing, it will be noted that my finger ring protector includes three principal parts, namely: a hook A, flexible securing member B, and a jump or round ring or clasp C. These parts will be set forth in detail.

In its structural features, the hook A is made of resilient or spring-like material and defines a pair of coacting legs It and H, which are interconnected at their bottoms by a yielding loop I2. The legs have intermediate portions 13a and I la, respectively, arranged adjacent each other, which may be spread apart due to the resilient or spring-like character of the material from which the hook is fashioned.

As clearly shown, an upper catch section lilb of the leg ii) is free, and projects upwardly and outwardly at an inclined angle relative to an upper end section lib of the other leg to form a catch A. Thus, a downwardly-converging throat I 4 is defined between these two upper sections for the purpose hereinafter mentioned. The free tip end of the end Mb is provided with a ball or protrusion 55 thereon, which is disposed at a predetermined distance from the upper section lib of the leg H. Furthermore, the lower section We of the leg it is bulged outwardly to a preselected extent and merges into the loop I2 of the hook.

For the purpose of illustration, the flexible securing member B has been disclosed as being formed from a chain. It will be appreciated, of course, that a large variety of materials and styles may be resorted to insofar as this member is concerned. The length of the member B may vary, as suggested by the break lines [6 in Figures 1 and 2. In certain cases, this member should have a length to encircle a persons wrist, while in other situations the member should extend around a persons neck.

It will be seen that the securing member B has one end thereofattached at I? to the upper section ill) of the hook leg H, While the jump or round ring 0 is connected to the opposite end of this securing member. The jump ring has an opening is of sufficiently large diameter for allowing this ring to be introduced over the ball i5, and then advanced along the legs it and ii in succession until the jump ring encircles the se curing member B, thereby forming a loop B in the latter, as suggested in Figure 2 of the drawing. This loop may encircle a persons wrist or neck.

Assuming that a person desires to protect a finger ring D against being misplaced or lost, a peripheral section thereof may be inserted readily 3 into the throat I4, and then this ring pushed downwardly, with the ball 15 and the leg l passing upwardly through the opening I! of the finger ring. Quite obviously, the adjacent intermediate portions lfla and I la of the hook may be spread apart until the finger ring is supported on the hook loop I 2, as shown in Figure 2. Of course, the portions Illa and Ha will snap back toward one another as soon as the ring D moves downwardly into the looped bottom of the hook.

With the parts now arranged in the manner shown in Figure 2, the upper catch section I0?) is depressed under some pressure toward the upper section lib of the attached leg. Now the jump or round ring is lowered over the upper sections of both legs in encircling relation therewith to provide a clasp therearound, as clearly shown in Figure 3. Upon release of pressure on the ball l5, the catch section Illb will spring outwardly, preventing the jump ring from slipping upwardly over the ball IS. The latter coacts with the section l0b in forming a shoulder 20 to resist the jump or round ring from being pulled in an upward direction over the catch.

Particular attention is called to the fact that the bulged section lllc is separated from the lower section llc of the leg H at a distance greater than the internal diameter of the jump or round ring C, whereby this ring will be limited in slipping downwardly when the ring C encircles the two legs of the hook, thereby preventing the jump or round ring from sliding accidentally oiT the hook.

In the event that the jump or round ring C should become unfastened from the catch section lllb, it will pass over the flexible securing member B, and the wearers attention will be attracted by a slight tug or pull. This will be especially true when a finger ring is carried by the hook, since its weight will cause this ring and the hook to gravitate downwardly, resulting in pulling the securing member B through the jump or round ring.

t will be appreciated that the protector may be made from precious metal, or otherwise. For providing the securing member B, chains of different widths may be employed, and other parts made to produce a balanced and attractive article. When the member B forms a neck-chain, the protector may be worn under the clothing, affording concealment of valuable finger rings. Moreover, these neck-chains may be wrapped around the wearers wrist, or shorter chains provided for encircling the wrists of the wearer with comfort.

Of the many individuals for which the finger ring protectors are designed, I wish to mention the following by way of example: factory workers, waitresses, counter girls, nurses, oilice workers, travellers, housewives and club women. Obviously, I do not desire to be limited in this respect.

The protector not only serves to guard against misplacernent and loss of finger rings, but af' fords security on persons, such as factory workers, when finger rings while being worn are a hazard of safety regulations and precautions. It affords security to travellers who prefer their valuable finger rings to be on their person, rather than placed in a pocketbook or some other receptacle used during travelling. This is especially true while the travellers are sleeping aboard trains and other means of transportation. The hook could be made Wide enough to have the owners name displayed thereon.

I claim:

1. In a finger ring protector of the character described: a resilient hook defining a pair of coacting legs, which are interconnected by a loop; these legs having intermediate portions arranged adjacent to each other, which may be spread apart; an elongated flexible securing member having one end attached to an upper section of one of the legs; the upper section of the other leg being free, and projecting outwardly relative to the attached leg to form a catch; the hook being made to support a finger ring, or the like; and a clasp connected to the opposite end of the securing member; the clasp having an opening therein sufficiently large for allowing this clasp to be introduced over the catch, and then advanced along the legs in succession until the clasp encircles the securing member, thereby forming a loop in the latter; the catch being made to be depressed under pressure toward the upper section of the attached leg, and into a position in which the clasp may be lowered over the upper sections of both legs in encircling relation therewith to preclude accidental removal of the finger ring; the free end of the catch section being spaced laterally from the upper section of the attached leg by a distance exceeding the greatest width of the opening in the clasp so as to normally prevent accidental slippage of the clasp upwardly over the catch.

2. In a finger ring protector of the character described: a resilient hook defining a pair of coacting legs, which are interconnected by a loop; these legs having intermediate portions arranged adjacent to each other, which may be spread apart; an elongated flexible securing member having one end attached to an upper section of one of the legs; the upper section of the other leg being free, and projecting outwardly relative to the attached leg to form a catch; the hook being made to support a finger ring, Or the like; and a clasp connected to the opposite end of the securing member; the clasp having an opening therein surficiently large for allowing this clasp to be introduced over the catch, and then advanced along the legs in succession until the clasp encircles the securing member, thereby forming a loop in the latter; the catch being made to be depressed under pressure toward the upper section of the attached leg, and into a position in which the clasp may be lowered over the upper sections of both legs in encircling relation therewith to preclude accidental removal of the finger ring; the free end of the catch section being spaced laterally from the upper section of the attached leg by a distance exceeding the greatest width of the opening in the clasp so as to normally prevent accidental slippage of the clasp upwardly over the catch; the free tip end of the catch section having a protrusion thereon coacting with the catch section to form a shoulder disposed to be engaged by the clasp to resist the latter from being pulled upwardly over the catch.

3. In a finger ring protector or the character described: a resilient hook defining a pair of coacting legs, which are interconnected by a loop; these legs having intermediate portions arranged adjacent to each other, which may b spread apart; an elongated flexible securing member having one end attached to an upper section of one of the legs; the upper section of the other leg being free, and projecting outwardly relative to the attached leg to form a catch; the hook being made to support a finger ring, or the like; and a clasp connected to the opposite end of the securing member; the clasp having an opening therein suificiently large for allowing this clasp to be introduced over the catch, and then advanced along the legs in succession until the clasp encircles the securing member, thereby forming a loop in the latter; the catch being made to be depressed under pressure toward the upper section of the attached leg, and into a position in which the clasp may be lowered over the upper sections of both legs in encircling relation therewith to preclude accidental removal of the finger ring; the free end of the catch section being spaced laterally from the upper section of the attached leg by a distance exceeding the greatest Width of the opening in the clasp so as to normally prevent accidental slippage of References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,194,809 Bigney Aug. 15, 1916 1,989,000 Dittman Jan. 22, 1935 Dittman Jan. 22, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1194809 *Feb 11, 1916Aug 15, 1916 Key-bing
US1989000 *May 9, 1934Jan 22, 1935Hickok Mfg Co IncArticle retaining device
US1989001 *May 9, 1934Jan 22, 1935Hickok Mfg Co IncKey ring assembly for key chains
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2797850 *Dec 22, 1954Jul 2, 1957Paul Hildenbrand AlbertFish stringers
US3124286 *Aug 4, 1961Mar 10, 1964 Expansible bracelet for keys
US4516708 *Jan 30, 1984May 14, 1985Elliott Lee AFinger ring holder
US7188493 *Jan 10, 2003Mar 13, 2007Mary ConwayJewelry for receiving rings
US8707731Nov 2, 2011Apr 29, 2014Emily Graves CrittendenWearable device for jewelry ring storage
US8752743Jul 16, 2011Jun 17, 2014Trineitte & Co.Article carrier for supporting multiple articles around a neck of a wearer
US9052058Nov 24, 2013Jun 9, 2015Bradley Troy SeversonJewelry holder
US9259062Sep 24, 2013Feb 16, 2016Jesus MartinezTactical finger band
US9301865 *Sep 16, 2012Apr 5, 2016Lauren Marie FarcoAccessory anchoring system and method
US20030126887 *Jan 10, 2003Jul 10, 2003Mary ConwayJewelry for receiving rings
US20060185393 *Feb 18, 2005Aug 24, 2006Cherry Kenneth FJewelry ring holding necklace
US20140081191 *Sep 16, 2012Mar 20, 2014Lauren Marie FarcoAccessory Anchoring System and Method
Classifications
U.S. Classification224/255, 224/257, 224/268
International ClassificationA44C9/00, A44C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C9/0084, A44C15/003
European ClassificationA44C9/00G, A44C15/00G