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Publication numberUS2665380 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1954
Filing dateNov 9, 1949
Priority dateNov 9, 1949
Publication numberUS 2665380 A, US 2665380A, US-A-2665380, US2665380 A, US2665380A
InventorsHickson William F, Mcgough William A
Original AssigneeCircle X Antenna Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerial arrangement
US 2665380 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1954 AERIAL ARRANGEMENT 5 Sheets-Sheet l Filed NOV. 9, 1949 Jam 5, 1954v w. F. HlcKsoN ET AL 2,665,380

AERIAL ARRANGEMENT Filed Nov. 9, 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 ih i il@ TE. [EJD. FPL F1-.12.

75 i 5y @2 62 63 a v fv @2 Patented Jan. 5, 1954 AERIAL ARRANGEMENT Clark Township, Union William F. Hickson,

County, and William N. J., assignors to C A. ircle X Antenna Corpora- McGough, Woodridge,

tion, Perth Amboy, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application November 9, 1949, Serial No. 126,413

(Cl. Z50-33) 7 Claims. 1

'I'he present invention relates to an aerial arrangement and it particularly relates to a television aerial.

It is among the objects of the present invention to provide a simple, inexpensive, readily mounted and dismounted, adjustable television aerial which will have high fidelity in bringing in television signals and which may be mounted exteriorly or interiorly on roofs or on Windows, as the case may be.

A further object is to provide a novel, improved television aerial which will cover substantially an entire television range Without constant adjustment and with assurance that most faithful reproduction will be obtained with maximum reception from various television broadcasting stations, regardless of their distance or angular location within the normal television broadcasting range.

Still further objects and advantages will appear in the more detailed description set forth below, it being understood, however, that this more detailed description is given by Way of illustration and explanation only and not by way of limitation, since various changes therein may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention.

In accomplishing the above objects, it has been found most satisfactory, according to one embodiment of the present invention, to provide a circular aerial construction desirably formed of light-weight aluminum, brass or magnesium tubing having a plurality of equally spaced, radially extending bars or braces. The arcuate divisions of the circle between the ends of the bars are equivalent to about three-quarters of an average wave length while the radial bars, braces or aerial elements average about one-half a wave length.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention consists of the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts as hereinafter more specifically described, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein is shown an embodiment of the invention, but it is to be understood that changes, variations and modifications can be resorted to which fall within the scope of the claims appended hereto.

In .the drawings wherein like reference characters denote corresponding parts throughout the several views:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of one form of aerial according to the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical transverse fragmentary sectional view upon the line 2-2 of Fig. 1l, upon an enlarged scale as compared to Fig. 1.

lFig.3` is'v a transversev vertical sectional view upon the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, upon an enlarged scale as compared to Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary transverse vertical Asectional view upon the line 4-4 of Fig. 1, upon an enlarged scale as compared to Fig. l.

Figs. 5, 6` and '7 are, respectively, diagrammatic plan views showing the manner of connecting or feeding the antenna at the center thereof and also showing the lead-oil. Wires.

Figs. 8 and 9 are, respectively, front elevational and side elevational views of an alternative form of antenna construction in which the radial elements extend inwardly and diverge outwardly on each side of the main circle and in which the transverse connecting members are connected to feeders.

Figs. 10 and 11 are, respectively, front elevational and side elevational views of another alternative antenna form in which the radial members diverge inwardly in both directions from the circular outer member but are provided with feeders on only one side of the antenna.

Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic front elevational view of still another alternative form showing two or more antenna in phase With each other.

Figs. 13 and 14 are, respectively, front and side elevational views showing an alternative form of antenna with several circular elements positioned at several diii'erent distances from the center of the antenna.

Figs. 15 and 16 are, respectively, front and side elevational views of an antenna construction with a different arrangement of radial members.

Figs. 17 and 18 are, respectively, side and front elevational views of an alternative form of antenna arrangement with a plurality of circular elements at different radial distances.

Figs. 19 and 20 are, respectively, side and front elevational diagrammatic views, Fig. 1,9 being on a somewhat larger scale as compared to Fig. 20, showing both linear and angular dimensions.

Figs. 21 to 24 show an alternative central supporting structure which may be utilized in connection with the aerial arrangements of Figs. 1 to 20, in Which Fig. 21 is a fragmentary front elevational view of the central arrangement, Fig. 22 is a vertical transverse sectional view upon the line 22 of Fig. 2l, Fig. 23 is a rear elevational view, and Fig. 24V is a fragmentary transverse sectional vew upon the line 2li-24 of Fig. 21.

Referring to Fig. 1, there is a circular element A and a plurality of radial ribs, bars or braces B having a central mount C. The elements A and B may be formed of brass, aluminum 4or -niagnesium tubing and they may be connected at the points D by the clips E.

which extend through the contacting corners I of the plates I0.

The ends of the circular element A may also be joined within one of said clamping elements E, as for example indicated at the point I1 in Fig. 1,

Interiorly, the flattened ends of the radial elements B are mounted upon a molded plastic or insulating board 26 by 'the bolts 21 and the nuts 24.

The ends 25 of the radial members B are connected, by the bars 28, by the bolts 3| and the nuts 32 to the insulating plate 26 as well as the flatl tened ends 25 of the radial members B.

j The nuts 39 and the bolts v28' enable'connection of wire conductors 52 leading down-from the bars 29'to the receiving set (see Fig. 5)

Referring to Fig. l, the stub bars constitute continuations of the connection straps 28 and they have an adjustable impedance at 46. The

stub bars 45 and the adjustable impedance 46 give a matching effect to enable adjustment of the antenna construction of Figs. Vl, 2, 3 and 4.

By adjusting the impedance 43, it is possible to match the antenna sets having an impedance of l'f.

about 300 ohms, but the impedance may readily vary from 72 to 300 ohms.

By the arrangement as shown in Figs. 1 to 4, it is possible to obtain best reception over the entire television band, particularly where the distance of each section of thegtube Aindicated by the dimension 48 is 3,51 of a wave length and the distance of eachA radius bar, as indicated by the dimension 49 is l of a wave length. such wave length being adjusted substantially at the middle of the complete television band.

' The normal television band now extends from 54 to 216 megacycles, with each broadcasting station having a band about six megacycles wide.

- Although not restricted thereto, the particular A antenna as illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5 may be made of aluminum tubing of 373 to 1'. outside diameter and. about 86.06 inches .in diameter.

Generally, the radius rods B in respect to each otherv will form a conical structure having an angle of about 130 to 150 degrees. Although the bars B are at an angle of 90 degrees to each other, as indicated by the angular dimension 58, this angle may be varied from to 120 degrees. If

desired three, four, six or eight rods B may. be

provided at equal angular spacings.

'If itis desired to make a smaller antenna, the segment-.indicatedby 48 may be adiusted in size' to be equivalent to about if of a'converging wavelength, while thel length of the radius rods B may be 11g of a wave length and this will give a convenient house size. v

In thev arrangement of Fig. 6I the central bars 5| cross over each other and connect together the diametrically opposite radius bars B instead ofl adjacent radial bars as in Figs. l to 5.

The lead-in wires 53 are attachedto each of the bars 5|, as are also the lead-in wires 52 in the structure of Figs. 1 to 5.

In the arrangement of Fig. '7, the two top adjacent radiusl elements B and the two bottom adjacent radius elements B are connected by the' horizontal -bars 54 *having the lead-in wires 55.

In the arrangement of Figs. 8 and 9, the circular, outer, tubular member 56 is of double conical shape to form a wafer, with radius bars 51 extending in both directions from the outer circular bar 56.

The cross bars 58 of Figs. 8 and 9 are provided with separate cross bars 59 which are connected in turn to the lead-in wires or feed-in wires 60.

In the arrangement of Figs. 10 and 1l, there is 'a double, conical construction with a circular outside element 6| and outwardly directed, ob-

. e lique radius bars 62 and 63. The bars 63 meet at a point 64 at one side of the unit.

At the other side of the unit of Figs. 10 and 11 are the vertical connecting bars 65 which are provided with feeders v66 leading to the set.

In the arrangement of Fig. 12 there is shown two circular members 'I5 having inwardly dii nuts |33 and it has Va'central dome portion |36v receiving a screw or bolt |31 and the nut |38 to"r rected radial bars 16, the inside ends of which are connected by the vertical tie-in bars 11 and 18. The bars 'I7 are connected by the member 'i9 while the bars T8' are connected bythe'tie members to the feed-in wires 8|.

In Fig. 13 there are shown two circular members 62 and 83 having the radial connecting bars 84 and the cross bars 85. The cross bars 85 arel connected to the set by the feeder wires 86.

1n the arrangement of Figs. 15 and 16, the outer circle 8'! has a six radial elements 88 leading to a cross bar 89 and having a downward feed 96.

In the arrangement of Figs. 1'7 and 18 there are two circular members 9| and 92 having radial elements 96 and 91 connecting bars 93 and 34 with a feed-in wire 95.

Figs. l0 and 20 are a diagrammatic view vshow-- ing the approximate dimensions in inches of a preferred form of antenna, such as shown in Figs. l to 6, based upon the assumption that the antenna has been set for the middle of the bandat 135 megacycles. In this arrangement of Fig. 19 the radius rods'have an actual length of 41.65 and a projective length of 39.16 while the entire circumference has a length of 246.18".

In Fig. 20 it will be noted that the arcuate sectors 48 have a dimension of 3A Wave length while radial sectors 49 have a dimension of about 1/2 wave length, with the spacing between the bars' B being about degrees.

In the arrangement of Figs. 21 to 24, the molded plastic or resin base |25 is provided with a series of recesses |26 at the bottom of the central depression |21, with stops |28 for the ends |29 of the tubes |30, which may form the 'radial bars of an antenna.

The hook members |3| hold the ends |29 of the bars |38 in position by means of the thread-v ed ends |32, the nuts 33 and the brace |34.l

The brace |34, as best shown in Fig.'22, 'has the -two ends|35 which are pressed down by the make connections to the lead-in wires. The

loops |49 have threaded ends |4| which extendv through the base |25 and are held in position by the nuts |42. The loops |40 enable mounting of the aerial and do not form a part of the electrical connections.

The television aerial of the present invention covers all television channels, eliminating the need for two separate antenna for the'high and low ends of the television band. The antenna gives an extremely highv power signal-as 'contrasted toa low noise ratio and'it covers a wide angle ofv receptionwithout requirementof 'reectors.

There is perfect match to'72, 150 and' 300. ohm

wir

lead-in lines, depending upon the receiver input circuit, and there is extremely high signal strength on all channels, eliminating the necessity for stacked arrays and guide structures. Moreover, there is extremely long distance reception as well as local reception.

The entire device, as shown, is a very lightweight one, for example about 11/2 pounds, with very low vibration tendencies and there practically is no wind noise. The few connected parts enable ready assembly and give most satisfactory performance on the television set.

If desired, the various radius rods B of Fig. 1 and l30 of Fig. 2l may be insulated from the outer circle just inside of the clips E and the ends of the circles A may also be insulated from one another at the junctions Il.

By the arrangement shown, the applicant has devised a simple, useful antenna construction having wide use in television receivers or even transmitters, which is of simple construction and which may be widely used.

While there has been herein described a preferred form of the invention, it should be understood that the same may be altered in details and in relative arrangement of parts within the scope of the appended claims.

Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of the invention, and in what manner the same is to be performed, what is claimed is:

l. A shallow conical aerial arrangement for television and other reception comprising a central insulating base, a plurality of outwardly extending radial conductor elements and an outside circular conductor element connecting the ends of the radial elements, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

2. A shallow conical television aerial arrangement comprising a vertical base consisting of a f circular conductor element and a plurality of radial conductor elements forming the sides of the cone and an insulating base at the apex thereof, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

3. A shallow conical aerial arrangement for television and other reception comprising a central insulating base, a plurality of outwardly extending radial conductor elements and an outside circular conductor element connecting the ends of the radial elements, and conductor bars on said base connecting pairs of said radial elements and having lead-in connections to the television set, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

4. A shallow conical television aerial arrangement comprisinga vertical base consisting of a circular conductor element and a plurality of radial conductor elements forming the sides of the cone and an insulating base at the apex thereof, and conductor bars on said base connecting pairs of said radial elements and having lead-in connections to the television set, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a Vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

5. A shallow conical aerial arrangement for television and other reception comprising a central insulating base, a plurality of outwardly extending radial conductor elements and an outside circular conductor element connecting the ends of the radial elements, and electrical connections on said base for the inside ends of said radial elements providing impedance adjustment and lead-ins to the television set, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

6. A shallow conical television aerial arrangement comprising a vertical base consisting of a circular conductor element and a plurality of radial conductor elements forming the sides of the cone and an insulating base at the apex thereof, and electrical connections on said base for the inside ends of said radial elements providing impedance adjustment and lead-ins to the television set, the diameter at the outside of the cone being substantially greater than the height of the cone and said elements being formed of metallic tubing and said circular element being positioned in a vertical plane and the length of the radial elements being substantially one-half of an average wave length.

7. A circular shallow dish-shaped television aerial comprising a plurality of outer cir'cular arcuate segments forming the periphery of the dish positioned so that the segments will lie substantially in a vertical plane, said segments being of an electrically conducting material, a central insulating mount positioned to one side of said plane, radial support conductors extending inwardly from the ends of said segments and away from the plane of said segments tomthe center mount to form the shallow dish Shape, and means to clamp the inner ends of said conductors to said mount, said aerial having an addi-tional circular member inside of and concentric to said segments.

WILLIAM F. HICKSON. WILLIAM A. MCGOUGH.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,796,295 Loth Mar. 17, 1931 2,237,778 Carter Apr. 8, 1941 2,278,560 Peters Apr. 7, 1942 2,485,654 Pickles Oct. 25, 1949 2,508,657 Toller-Bond May 23, 1950 2,532,920 Johnson Dec. 5, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 338,242 Germany July 2l, 1921 OTHER REFERENCES Radio-Electronics, pages l5 and 24, August 1949, Welin Circle Antenna.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1796295 *Mar 23, 1923Mar 17, 1931Ind Des Procedes W A Loth SocDevice for determining the direction of flow of a magnetic field
US2237778 *Jan 29, 1938Apr 8, 1941Rca CorpShort wave antenna
US2278560 *Sep 30, 1939Apr 7, 1942Telefunken GmbhAntenna
US2485654 *May 28, 1946Oct 25, 1949Standard Telephones Cables LtdAntenna
US2508657 *Nov 7, 1946May 23, 1950Decca Record Co LtdAerial system
US2532920 *Aug 13, 1948Dec 5, 1950Arthur Johnson WilliamRadio aerial system, and particularly directive aerial system
DE338242C *Nov 29, 1917Jun 21, 1921Drahtlose Telegraphie GmbhAntenne mit flaechenartiger Endkapazitaet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2746040 *May 20, 1950May 15, 1956Rca CorpAnnular element antenna systems
US3231891 *Dec 26, 1961Jan 25, 1966Canoga Electronics CorpMulti-polarized loop antenna array electromagnetically coupled to spaced transmission line
US3478363 *Mar 7, 1968Nov 11, 1969Wells Laurence CHorizontal v-shaped dipole antenna for television reception
US3727230 *Mar 3, 1971Apr 10, 1973Sony CorpAntenna having a combined dipole and loop portion
US8054237Nov 8, 2011Winegard CompanyCompact high definition digital television antenna
US20100302118 *Dec 2, 2010Winegard CompanyCompact high definition digital television antenna
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/795, 343/809, 403/388, 343/820, 343/808
International ClassificationH01Q9/28, H01Q9/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q9/28
European ClassificationH01Q9/28