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Publication numberUS2665836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1954
Filing dateJan 10, 1951
Priority dateJan 10, 1951
Publication numberUS 2665836 A, US 2665836A, US-A-2665836, US2665836 A, US2665836A
InventorsWarren C Rendall
Original AssigneeGaylord Container Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Produce tray
US 2665836 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12, 1954 w. c. RENDALL 2,665,836

PRODUCE TRAY File d Jan. 10, 1951 FIG. I. .9 5

lNVENTORi WARREN C. RENDALL Patented Jan. 12, 1954 PRODUCE TRAY Warren 0. Kendall, Tampa, Fla., assignor to Gaylord Container Corporation, St. Louis, Mo., a

corporation of Maryland Application January '10, 1951, Serial No. 205,345

2 Claims.

This invention relates to a carrying tray made out of solid fibreboard, corrugated fibreboard or any other suitable material, and more particularly to a tray which will provide proper ventilation for fresh fruits and vegetables or similar articles when the trays are stacked, one on another.

The use of flbreboard containers and tray for produce such as fruit and vegetables has always presented a problem of providing proper ventilation. Fresh fruits and vegetables must have free circulation of air or spoilage will result. Most fibreboard produce containers are provided with die cut holes in their walls to allow for air circulation but this has never been the complete answer since this requires another step in manufacture. Furthermore, die cut holes weaken the container and often do not provide adequate circulation when containers are stacked. There has long been a need for an open tray of fibreboard which is inexpensive to manufacture and can be stacked and still provide adequate air circulation.

One 'ofthe primary objects of this invention is toprovide a container for produce which will readily admit .of stacking and will also provide for adequate ventilation for the produce carried.

Another object of this invention is to provide a tray for produce requiring a minimum blank waste.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a produce tray which can be shipped to the user in a flatwise condition and can be easily and quickly fabricated without special tools or special skill.

One of the final objects of this invention is to provide a produce tray suitable to be constructed of solid fibreboard or corrugated fibreboard. 7

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon a full and complete understanding of the construction and operation of this device.

This invention provides a reinforced supporting structure for a receptacle comprising a wall having a stacking flange with a depending end marginal member, said wall also having an end flange with a marginal flap attached thereto, said end flange, said flap, and said depending marginal member forming a column which is secured to the adjacent wall.

The invention also consists in the parts and in the arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and claimed. In the accompanying drawings which form part of this Fig. 3 is an enlarged plan view of one of the corners of the tray.

Referring now to the drawings in detaiL'it' will be seen that the embodiment of the invention which has been illustrated is formed from a single blank having a bottom panel I defined by opposing pairs of end scores 2 and side scores 3. The side scores 3 define the bottom edge of sidewalls 4, and the end scores 2 define the bottom edge of the end walls 5. The upper edge of each end wall 5 is provided with a stacking flange 6 defined by a score 1. Each end of each stacking flange 6 is provided with an end tab 8 defined by a continuation of the score 3. In a similar manner, each end of each end wall 5 is provided with an end wall flange 9 defined by a continuation of the score 3. Double scores In on the outer margin of each end wall flange 9' define foldable end wall flaps H. The end wall flanges 9 and. end wall flaps l l are provided with slots at the ends thereof which separate the flanges 9 and flaps II from the end tabs 8 and the side walls 4.

The tray may be fabricated by bending the side walls 4 and end walls 5 upwardly along the side scores 3 and end scores 2 to a substantially upright position.

Next the stacking flanges 6 are folded inwardly along the scores 1 to form substantially right angles with the end walls 5. The end tabs 8 are folded downwardly along the continuations of the scores 3 into a substantially vertical position.

The end wall flanges 9 are folded along the continuations of score 3 to a position flatwise against the outer face of the end members 8. Lastly, the end wall flaps H are rebent along the double scores It! and inserted into the spaces between the inner faces of the end tabs 8 and the outer faces of the side walls 4. The end wall flaps l I, the end tabs 8, the end wall flanges 9, and the side walls 4 are then connected together by staples I2 or other suitable'means.

Preferably, the end wall flanges S are provided with end wall flaps l I as illustrated in the drawings, but these end Walls flaps are optional and can be omitted. While it is preferred to insert the end tabs 8 between the end wall flanges 9 and 3 end wall flaps H, the end tabs 8 may also be secured to the outside faces of the end wall flanges 9 or adjacent to the side walls 4.

The tray is now in set up form and it is ready for use. The end construction including the end wall 5 and the stacking flange 6 act to strengthen the container and prevent any spreading of the side wall 4. The end tab 8, the end wall flange ,9, and the end wall flap H form a 3 ply column which is connected to the side wall 4 thereby providing a rigid structure to resist any vertical force such as a stacking load. When the trays are stacked one on another, the stacking flange E and the aforementioned supporting column structure will sustain any normal load thereon, Since the end walls and supporting columns are of a greater height than the side walls 4, there is a space provided between stacked trays which allows for the ventilation which is so necessary for perishable produce,

It is to be understood that the embodiments herein described are illustrative and not restrictive, and "it is also tobe understood that the invention be susceptible of embodiment in other modified forms, and that all such modifications which are similar or equivalent hereto come equally within the scope of the claims.

What I claim is: 7

1. An open top rectangularly shaped tray comprising a, bottom, a pair of opposed side walls and a pair of opposed end walls of greater height than said side wal is, the upper edge of each of said end alls having a s ckin flange integral and substa iall o xtens ve en th th ewith folded nward at gh ng es hereto, said fl nge havins end tabs depend n h refrom. each nd of aid stacki g flange bei g 'remforoed b a 3-p1y rigid vertical load sustaining column extending from the bottom of said tray to the upper edge of said end Wall, said column being formed by a flang toinf ec ed t e nd of said end Wall folded at right angles thereto, said flange having an extension folded in spaced parallel rela'tien to the inner face of said flange, said extension being positioned flatwise between the adjacent side wall and said end tab connected to said stacking flang s id end tab nterposed between aid nd wa l fl nge an the folded 4 extension thereof, all of said elements of said column extending to the bottom of said tray and being secured in flatwise contacting relation to said adjacent side wall.

2. An upwardly opening container adapted to provide ventilation for the contents when stacked in vertical tiers, said container comprising a bottom, a pair of opposing side walls, and a pair of opposing end walls of greater height than said side walls, each ofsaid end walls being provided with an upper marginal stacking flange folded inwardly at right angles to said end walls, each of said end walls being provided with a foldably connected end flange having a foldably connected end flap thereon, said end flange being disposed inwardly at right angles to said end wall with said end flap reversely folded in spaced parallel relation thereto, said end flange and said spaced end flap being positioned in parallel relation with the end portion of the adjacent side wall, said stacking flange having end tabs thereon substantially equal in length to the height of said end wall positioned downwardly between said end flange and said spaced end flap to form a solid, three-ply, rectangularly shaped reinforcing column, said reinforcing column extending from said stacking flange downwardly to the lower margin of said end wall, said reinforcing column being fixed to said adjacent side wall.

WARREN C. RENDALL.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PA'IENTS Number Name Date 1,830,420 Blitz Nov. 3, 1931 1,858,216 Golon May 10, 1932 1,919,912 Snell July 25, 1933 2,147,675 Shoemaker Feb. 21, 1939 2,155,450 Shoemaker Apr, 25, 1939 2,226,089 Anthony Dec. 24, 1940 2,484,975 Van Saun l Oct. 18, I949 FOREIGN 'PATENTS Number Country Date 155,529 Great Britain h-.. Dec. 123, 1920 552,710 Great Britain lee-.2- Apr. 21-, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1830420 *Jun 11, 1930Nov 3, 1931Blitz OttoCarton
US1858216 *Dec 30, 1931May 10, 1932George P Schinzel JrPaper transfer file
US1919912 *Dec 9, 1931Jul 25, 1933Appleford Paper Products LtdContainer
US2147675 *Jun 8, 1936Feb 21, 1939ShoemakerChick box
US2155450 *Oct 5, 1936Apr 25, 1939Shoemaker Louis AChick box
US2226089 *Jan 20, 1938Dec 24, 1940Marathon Paper Mills CoDisplay carton
US2484975 *Nov 22, 1948Oct 18, 1949California Container CorpShipping container
GB155529A * Title not available
GB552710A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3202337 *Nov 23, 1962Aug 24, 1965Owens Illinois Glass CoPaperboard container
US3473654 *Aug 1, 1967Oct 21, 1969Ball Brothers Co IncAssemblage of packaging trays and packaging tray therefor
US3704823 *Dec 8, 1969Dec 5, 1972Georgia Pacific CorpOpen-top stacking carton and blank therefor
US3784082 *Oct 29, 1971Jan 8, 1974Ex Cell O CorpNon-returnable container case
US3837562 *Jul 3, 1972Sep 24, 1974A CaliContainer for packaging papers
US4052933 *Jul 15, 1976Oct 11, 1977International Paper CompanyTray forming method
US4418863 *Sep 2, 1982Dec 6, 1983Georgia-Pacific CorporationProduce tray with reinforced corner construction
US5415345 *Sep 3, 1991May 16, 1995Fra.Mo. Snc Di Franca Riva & CBox with integral corner reinforcements
US5704193 *Oct 12, 1995Jan 6, 1998Roe; Quentin J.Container for shipping and displaying articles, and method for making
US5971906 *Dec 30, 1997Oct 26, 1999Tharpe, Jr.; Johnny M.Tray forming apparatus and method
US7470225Oct 19, 2007Dec 30, 2008R&L ManufacturingMethod for forming a double glued corner tray structure
US7470226Aug 25, 2006Dec 30, 2008R & L ManufacturingApparatus and method for forming a container having an enhanced corner support structure
US7993255Dec 10, 2008Aug 9, 2011Smurfit-Stone Container CorporationApparatus and method for forming a container having an enhanced corner support structure
US8177698Jul 8, 2011May 15, 2012Smurfit-Stone Container CorporationApparatus and method for forming a container having an enhanced corner support structure
US8177699Nov 25, 2003May 15, 2012Smurfit-Stone Container CorporationTray forming apparatus
US8388507Apr 19, 2012Mar 5, 2013Smurfit-Stone Container CorporationTray forming apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/164, 229/174, 229/198, 229/191, 229/169, 229/916
International ClassificationB65D5/00, B65D5/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/28, Y10S229/916, B65D5/003
European ClassificationB65D5/28, B65D5/00B2C