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Publication numberUS2666542 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1954
Filing dateMay 24, 1948
Priority dateMay 24, 1948
Publication numberUS 2666542 A, US 2666542A, US-A-2666542, US2666542 A, US2666542A
InventorsPrice Charles S
Original AssigneePrice Charles S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive metal foil, bottle cap thereof, and method
US 2666542 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. S. PRICE Jan, 19, 1954 ADHESIVE METAL FOIL, BOTTLE CAP THEREOF, AND METHOD Filed May 24. 1948 ialfl il MLTTor/O TRADE MARK y INVENTOR (HA m55 5. PR/c:

Patented Jan. 19, 1954 UNITED STATES it TENT OFFICE ADHESIVE METAL FOIL, BOTTLE CAP THEREOF, AND METHOD This invention relates to metal foil, one side of which is coated with adhesive material, articles made therefrom, and methods of manufacture.

The principal object of my invention, generally considered, is to produce metal sheet or foil material which is suitable for application to objects, an example being corked necks of bottles, using heat or moisture, articles made from such material, and methods of manufacture.

Another object of my invention is the production of adhesive foil material in which an intermediate layer of heat-softening cement serves as f a binder between a nlm coating of remoistening glue and the metal foil.

A further object of my inve-ntion is the provision of metal foil so treated that it may be sealed to itself or applied to any surface by the alternative means of heat and moisture,

A still further object of my invention is to provide a sheet of metal foil having adhesive on one side, this adhesive being applied directly to the metal without the use of an intermediate layer of paper, a transparent primer being used instead which permits' the metal to show through on the gummed. side, which can be attractively colored if desired, and when a label produced from this material is applied to a transparent bottle the metal on the gummed side will.l show through the bottle which is to be desired as it shows that the label is entirely or" metal.

Another object of my invention is to produce oil, one side of which is first coated With a lilm of heat-softening cement and said hlm is, in turn,

coated with a film of remoistening glue, the difneck and sealed thereto, either by heat or after moistening, by crimping in place therearound, providing a tamper-proof closure.

A further object of my invention is to provide a metal hood which can be sealed over the top of a corked or capped bottle, as by using heatsoftening and/or reznoistening adhesive between the hood and bottle, and/o1` crimping said hood on the bottle neck said hood having perforations therearound slightly below the parting line of the cork or cap from the bottle, and said perforations terminating at a tab properly marked and indented at the beginning of the perforations, so that in lifting and pulling the tab, the metal hood will start tearing at the perforated line and tear cleanly around the bottle, leaving the pouring lip clear and free from possible contamination from the hood.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a tamper-proof closure which is made of thin metal provided with suitable means of attachment to the neck of a bottle and with means for opening which destroys the closure when opened, thereby avoiding the objection to other closures currently used for this purpose which are made from some form of cellulose, may readily be removed by soaking in water, and can be replaced after removal and will again dry to original form without injury to the closure, and still others in current use of paper-backed foil having alayer of remoistening gum applied to the paper back, which paper back provides a wick action on the liquid being poured from the bottle, retaining this liquid, andmaking the pouring lip of the botle Wet, unsightly and unsanitary.

An additional object of my invention is to provide an attractive decorated hood for the neck of a bottle which may, if desired, entirely enclose the top of the cork or have the top of the cork exposed to permit the decorated top of the cork to appear and allow the government tax stamp to be affixed directly thereto.

A further objectof my invention is to provide a hood closure applied to a bottle neck in such a manner that the lower portion only, below a perforated strip, is iirmly fastened to the bottle, leaving an upper or removable portion free from adhesion to the bottle sovthat it can be readily removed therefrom, accomplished as by only moistening the bottle below the perforation line or, if the closure applied by means of heat, only applying the heat below the perforation line. Y

Other objects and advantages of the invention, relating tothe particular arrangement and come bination of the various parts, will become apparent as the description proceeds.

Referring to the drawing,

Fig. 1 is an elevational View of a blank from which bottle caps embodying my invention may be produced.

Fig, 2 is a sectional View on the line II--II of Fig.v l, in the direction of the arrows.

v Fig. 3 is an elevational view of a bottle cap such as may be produced from a blank such as illus- Referring to the drawing infdetaiL, like parts.y being designated by like reference charactersand iirst considering the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. l and 2, there is shown a sheet of metal foil 9, to oneside` of-.which is applied a film or coating of heat-softening cement S. Such cement is desirably formed -ofa suitable vinyl resin or polyvinyl butyral, applied either in solutionV or in molten state; or a cement composed of phthalic anhydride and ethylene glycol, or other resin type adhesive, and during application is preferably. of such a consistency that it may bewapplied by a roller in a continuous process; Such a process isV disclosed in theV Nadeau Patent. No. 2,322,048, dated June 15, 1943.

In other words, referring vto Fig. l of the drawing oi said patent, asheet of metalV foil 9 of desired width and thickness, such for example .002 inch in thickness, may be passed from a supply roll into Contact withan applicator roller, which carries up and into contact with thel undersurface o the sheet an appropriate amount or"v the heatsoftening cement` contained in a hopper in which the roll rotates; The cement in theV hopper is maintained fluid by keeping at a suitable temperature or may be applied'in solution,` the solvent later driven oil", as in an overr.

After application of a. nlm 8 of' such cement to the undersurface of the foil, saidfilm is'cocled or dried, such as naturally in the air orv in a cooler, if applied hot, or itV asa solution preferably oy passing through a drier, such as that indicated by the reference character 5 in the patent referred to. After cooling or drying, so that the cement hassolidiied or hardened, the surface of the lm 8 is, in turn, coated with a film 'l of reinoistening glue. This may be accomplished in any desired manner, as by passing into contact with an applicator roller. similar to the applicator'roller'used for applying the heat-softening cement, which roller deposits thereon a film of remoistening glue, which may be a good dextrin glue, or which may be combined with animal glue, and which obviously should be compatible with the heat-softening cement.

The applicator roller revolves in a hopper containing such glue of the proper. consistency, so that after. the application of the film, it is readily dried, either naturally in the air, or preferably by passing through a drier such as indicated in the patent referred to by the reference character 9. After emerging from the drier, if used, the foil passv through guide rolls such as those represented' by the reference characters 12 and 13 in the patent referred to. The doubly coatedv foil may then be linally wound up on a drive roll, such as that designated by the refer ence character l0 in said patent.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I iirst produce a, preferably quite thin, sheet or teil of metal, which .may be.v aluminum., copper, -bln or any metal, preferably non-rusting, as desired. The uncoated side of the foil may be colored and/or decorated as indicated at ii in Fig. 1 and cut to size, an example being represented in the same figure. In this example, there is shown how to make a blank for a bottle cap, but it is obvious that I do not wish to be limited to this use, as my foil may serve for making any article which it isv desired to supply to some other object. It is, however, particularly adapted for making tamperprooi closures such as the bottle caps represented in Figs. 3 to 6 inclusive.

In the` specic embodiment I have shown a bottlefcapv blank l which is generally sectorshaped, and along the small circumferential edge isa series` oiperforations 6, providing a readily separable circumferential edge strip terminating at one end in a tab d bearing the legend Pullv Here and an arrow directed as in Fig. l, Fig. 3, or Fig. e, for a purpose which will subsequently be'v explained. The perforation line may beplaced at any location, thus permitting theunsealing of thevcap at point desired.

Fig. 3 shows one embodiment of my bottle cap Irl' in1whicha blank, such ask designated I in Fig. 1', is wrapped around a truste-conical mandrel of a size corresponding with a bottle neck to which the produced cap is to be applied, as in Fig. 6, and whereby overlapping radial' edges of the blank are subsequently sealed, preferably by heat, along the radial band betweenv the lines I2 and Il, but either by the application of heat or the moistening of the glue in that area.

The mandrel is also of such a size that the small end of the cap produced projects beyond the end thereof, whereby upon the application of pressure to said end, an inturned annular flat flange, such as represented by the reference character 24 in Fig.` fr, 2S in Fig. 5, and25 in Fig. 6, is formed in a plane transverse to the axis or" the mandrel. A fragmentary portion of the material from which such a iia-nge is formed is also shown in Fig. 1, where it is designated 23. This ange, when the cap is in place, will extend overfthe top'of the'cork and yet not entirely cover the cork. It is not desirable to entirely cover the cork because, in most cases, the cork is decorated and there is a government strip stamp which is applied. It is desirable that this stamp be applied directly to the cork. In cases where it is desirable to entirely enclose the top of the cork, a round metallic disc can be applied over the cork, and the cap applied over said disc, making a completely metallic enclosure. Such a disc may be applied to the top of the cork prior to the applying of the hood, placed inside the hoody prior to application, or permanently incorporated with the hood by means of heat or moisture at the time the hood is formed. so that the closed end hood can be applied to the neck of the bottle as a unit. Such a disc is marked 30.'

Such a cap I I, as represented in Fig. 3, is-then place'd'over the neck I 9 of a bottle as represented in Fig. 5, corked as indicated by I3. In this embodiment, the foil, heat-softening cement, and glue are respectively designated by the characters 20, 21 and 22. Said cap, of course, fits such a corked neck with clearance, and the completed seal represented in Fig. 5, is produced by the application of resilient pressure to the external surface `of the cap afterI application, so as to crimp the material around the neck and bead, if any, and into. iirm engagementwiththe entire externalsurface. of.. the. enclosed. neck portion. This Aas at the part to engage the cap below the line of perforations, and the cap applied thereover and crimped in place by the use of the remoistening glue coating or film 22 in direct engagement with said neck.

When it is desired to remove a cork from a bottle sealed with one of my caps, after application as shown in Fig. 5, all that is necessary is to grasp the tab labelled Pull Here and unwind the strip 4 from the top of the bottle cap, along the line of perforations 6, I3 or I f3, as the case may be. This operation exposes the cork I8 and makes it possible to then immediately uncork the bottle without any interference from the metal foil or sheet covering, leaving the pouring lip free from contact with the closure.

Fig. 4 illustrates a cap i5 similar to Fig 3, but with a wider pull strip, here designated I t. Such a form would be used where it is desired to remove a larger portion of the cap, as where the cork projected a greater distance from the bottle neck than shown in Fig. 5, or where a screw cap longer than the projecting portion of the cork I8 was employed. Except for this diierence, the form of Fig. 4 is similar to that of Figs. 3 and 5.

Fig. 6 shows how a longitudinal edge portion of a blank overlaps the adjacent edge portion, as indicated at 26, to provide a sealing band. as be- `tween the lines I2 and I 'I of the cap Il illustrated in Fig. 3 The foil, heat-softening cement, and glue, are here respectively designated by the characters 21. 28 and 29.

Fig. 7 merely shows one form of the trademark IU which may be employed, another form being shown in Figs. 1 and 3.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have produced a material which is an improvement over the conventional paper-back foil, in that there is no paper to assert a wick action on the contents of the bottle when openedand the coated foil can be applied to almost any surface, and when applied, cannot be removed without destroying it. This feature is particularly advantageous in sealing liquor bottles and other vessels requiring tamper-prooi closures.

The treated foil of my invention is cheaper than paper-back foil because the intermediate layer, forming a bond between the foil and the remoistening glue, is cheaper than the paper plus the cost of applying the paper. It is particularly desirable to use my invention for the purpose of f eifecting a hermetic seal around the cork to prevent the latter from drying out, shrinkingand leaking.

Another very important feature is the tear tab and its connected strip. The tab designated 3 or I5, and marked Pull Here, and the notch designated 2, aligns the beginning of the perforations following around the closure along the line 6 in Fig. 1, and 13 and 14, respectively, in Figs. 3 and 4.

This permits an effective uniform method of opening the package by entirely removing the upper portion of the seal, permitting the cork to be withdrawn. The perforated line is customarily placed a short distance below the position of the parting line of the cork with the bottle when the cap is in place, leaving the pouring edge of the bottle clean and clear of any contamination from the cap and cap adhesive. This closure will tear clean and follow the perforations accurately.

Absence of wick action ensures a clean pouring lip.

Although preferred embodiments of my invention have been disclosed, it will be understood that modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of the appended claims, that vthe term cork includes the other means employed for closing bottles, and that the foil, although preferably of metal, may be made of other iiexible material, such as fiber, cloth, paper, and plastic material.

' I claim:

1. The method of making a substantially tamper-proof closure for a corked bottle, comprising cutting from foil one side of which is coated with heat-softening resin-type cement on top of Whichis a coating of remoistening glue, a sector of the proper size for fitting the top portion of a bottle neck, forming perforations along the short circumferential side of said sector to provide a tear strip of a width slightly more than the distance that the cork will project from the bottle neck, forming said sector as a hollow frustoconical article by bending it around a correspondingly formed mandrel with the coated surface inside, with overlapping radial edge portions, with its small end extending beyond said mandrel, sealing together said overlapping edge portions, by means of a coating of cement or glue, bending the extended edge of the small end over the end of said mandrel providing an inturned flange to overlie the periphery of the projecting end of a cork in said bottle, applying said frusto-conical article over a corked bottle neck so that said inturned ilange overlies the periphery of the cork, and crimping said frusto-conical article about said corked bottle neck, while employing only the adhesive on said article, exclusive of that on said tear strip, to seal it to said neck, thereby facilitating removal of said strip,

2. The method of making a substantially tarnper-proof closure for a corked bottle, comprising cutting from foil a sector of the proper size for tting the top portion of a bottle neck, forining periorations along the short circumferential side of said sector to provide a tear strip of a width slightly more than the distance that the cork will project from the bottle neck, forming said sector as a hollow frusto-conical article by bending it around a correspondingly formed mandrel, with overlapping radial edge portions, with its small end extending beyond saidmandrel, sealing together said overlapping edge portions, bending the extended edge of the small end over the end of said mandrel providing an inturned iiange to overlie the periphery of the projecting end of a cork in said bottle, applying said frusto-eonical article over a corked bottle neck so that said inturned flange overlies the periphery of the cork, and crimping said frustoconical article about said corked bottle neck, while employing adhesive to seal it, except said tear strip, to said neck, thereby facilitating removal of said strip.

3. The method of making a substantially taniper-proof closure for a corked bottle, comprising cutting from foil, one side of which is coated with heat-softening resin, on top of which is a coating of remoistening glue having after drying a coeli'icient of expansion, sufficiently different from that of the heat-softening resin, so that it formsl cracks which allow the heat-softening resin to pass therethrough, so that a seal can be eeeted by the application of heat, as well as by the use of moisture, a sector of the proper size for fitting the topportion' of a bottleneckforrning said sector as a hollow truste-conical article by bending it around a correspondingly-formed mandrel, with the coated surface inside, with overlapping radial edge portions, with its small end extending beyond saidy mandrel, sealing together said overlapping edge portions-by means of the' coating of resin or glue, bending theV extended edge oi the small end over thefend' of said mandrel providing an inturned ilange to` overlie the periphery or the projecting end of acork-in said bottle, applying said truste-conical article over a corked bottle neck so that said inturned flange overlies the periphery or" the cork, and

crimping said :frusto-conical article aboutl said.

corked bottle neck, while employing either of. the adhesives thereon to sealit to said neck.

4. The method of mak-ing a substantially tamper-proof closure for a corkedbottle, comprising cutting from sheet metal foil, carrying on one side a rst coating of a dried. ii-lm of heat-softening resin, and a second coating. on said first coating of a remoistening glue, compatible with the film of Said heat-softening resin and having after dry-ing a coenicient of expansion suiiiciently different from that of the heatsoftening resin, so that it forms cracksv which allow the heat-softening resin topass therethrough, for effecting a seal by the application of heat, as Well as by the use of moisture, a sector of the proper size for ntting the top portion of a bottle neck, forming said sector as a hollow truste-conical article by bending it around a correspondingly-formed mandrel, with overlapping radial edge portions, sealing together only said overlapping edge portions by means oi said resin or remoistening glue, applying said truste-conical article over a corked bottle neck, and crimping it about said corked bottle neck.

5. The method of making a bottle cap comprising coating one side of metal foil with a lln of heat-softening resin, hardening, coating said hardened iilm with a film of a remoistening glue, having after drying a coeiiicient of expansion sufficiently different from that oi the heatsortening resin, so that it forms cracks which allow the heat-softening resin to pass therethrough, for effecting a seal by the application of heat, as Well as by the use of moisture, drying,

cutting from said ioil a sector or the proper size for tting the top portion of a bottle neck, forming said sector as a hollow truste-conical article by bending it around a correspondingly-formed mandrel with overlapping radial edge portions,

with the small end extending beyond said mandrei, sealing together said overlapping edge portiene of said sector by means of the coating of resin or glue, and turning the extended edge at the small end over the end of said mandrel to provide an inturned lia-nge to overliethe periphery of the projecting end of a cork, whereby said capis ready for application to and crimping around a corked neck of a bottle and connection to'said neck by eithe-r heat or moisture.

6. The method of making a cap for a corked bottle comprising coating one side of metal foil with a film of heat-softening cement, cooling, coating said nlm with a film of rcmoistenin'g glue, drying, cutting from said `hlm a sector of the proper size for fitting the top portion of a bottle neck, forming periorations along the short circumferential side oi said sector to provide a tearstrip of a Width slightly more than the distance that the corkwill project from the bottle neck of4 a bottle to which said cap is to.' be applied;k `forming said` sector as a holler.7 trusteconical article by bending it around a correspondingly-formed mandrel,V with overlapping radial edge portions, with its small end extending beyond said mandrel, sealing together said overlapping edge portions by means of the coating of cement or glue, and turning the extended edge of said small end over the edge of said mandrel to provide an inturned flange to overlieY the peripheryl of the projecting end ci a cork, to register the cap with the top of the bottle and prevent it from sliding down the neck of said bottle during the crimping operatie-n, whereby saidcap is ready for application to and crimping around thefcorked neck of. a bottle and connection to said neck, except at the tear strip, by either heat or moisture.

fl. The methodv of making a bottle cap comprising coating. one side of metal foil with a double nlm of adhesive, the inner nlm of which is heat-softening. cement and the out-er nlm oi which is discontinuous and remoistening, whereby said double nlm is softenable for attachment by. heat or. moisture, hardening said adhesive, cutting from said foila sector. of the proper size for iitting. the top portion of a bottle neck, forming saidsector as a hol-loW-irusto-conical article by bending it around a correspondingly-iormed mandrel with overlapping edge portions, with its small end extending beyond said mandrel, sealing together said overlapping edge portions of said sector by means of said double of adhesive, and turning the extended edge of the small end over the end of said mandrell to provide an inturned flange .te ov-erlie, the periphery of the projecting end of a cork.y whereby said cap is ready for application to and crimping around a corked neck of a bottle connection to said neck by the use of heat or moisture.

8. Sheetmaterial` comprising metal foil with a rst coating on one side or a dried iilm or" a heat-softening resin selected vfrom the group consisting of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, a second coating on said iirst coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of heat-softening resin.

9. Sheet material comprising metal foil with a first coating on one side of a dried film of a heat-softening polyvinyl butyral, and a second coating on said' first coating of a remoistening glue compatible with said butyral and having after drying av coe'iicient of expansion sufficiently different from that of said butyral so that it forms cracks which allow the heat-softening butyral to pass therethrough, so that a seal can be effected. by the application of heat as Well as by the use of moisture.

10. Sheet material comprising metal foil with a rst coating on one side of a dried iilrn of phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resin, and a second coating on said first coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of resin and selected from the group consisting of a good dextrin glue and such combined with animal glue.

1l. An article adapted for application to and sealing on the neck of a corked bottle, comprising a sector of` metal4 foil in truste-conical form on the inner side of which is a rlrst coating of a dried lrnof` a heat-softeningresin, selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating lons saidrstcoating of a remoistoning glue compatible' with the lin of heatsoftening resin, and uniting overlapping radial edge portions, and an inwardly projecting nange on the small end of the article to overlie the cork of a bottle to which applied.

12. An article adapted for application to and sealing on the neck of a corked bottle, comprising a sector of metal foil in frusto-conical form on the inner side of which is a nrst coating of a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting .of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalie anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating on said nrst coating of a remois| tening glue compatible with the nlm of heatsoftening resin, whereby said double nlm provides an adhesive softenable by either heat or moisture, and uniting overlapping radial edge portions.

13. A bottle cap 'comprising a sector of metal foil in frusto-conical form on the inner side of which is a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating on said nrst coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of heat-softening resin, and uniting overlapping radial edge portions, perforations extending circumferentially around the narrow edge of said cap to provide a tear strip of a width corresponding approximately with the expected projection of a cork from the neck of a bottle with which used, and an inwardly projecting nange on the small end of said cap to overlie the cork in a bottle neck to which applied.

14. A bottle cap comprising a sector of metal foil in frusto-conical form on the inner sidev of which is a nrst coating of a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl-butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating on said nrst coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of heat-softening resin and connecting overlapping radial edge portions, and perforations extending circumferentially around the narrow end of said cap to provide a tear strip of a width corresponding approximately to the expected projection of a cork in the neck of a bottle with which used.

15. In combination, Aa bottle with a generally frusto-conical beaded corked neck, a closure device in close sealing engagement therewith and comprising a sector of metal foil in hollow frustoconical form enclosing the neck of said bottle, said sector carrying on its inner side a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating on said nrst coating of a remoistemng glue compatible with the nlm of 'heat-softening resin, with an upper inner flanged portion overlying the cork in said neck, said coatings uniting the radial edge portions of said sector which overlap and the device to said neck.

16. In combination, a bottle with generally frusta-conical beaded corked neck, a closure device in close sealing engagement therewith and ycomprising a disc of metal foil lying on the top of the cork, a sector of metal foil bent in hollow frusto-conical form enclosing the neck of said bottle, with an upper inner nange portion overlying said disc on said cork, said device having its inner surface carrying, nrst a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting of polyviny1 butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and' a second coating on said nrst coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of heat-softening resin, and uniting radial edge portions of said sector which overlap, the disc to said sector, and the device to said neck.

17. In combination, a bottle with a generally frusto-conical beaded corked neck, and closure Y device in close sealing engagement therewith and comprisinga sector of metal foil in hollow frustoconical form enclosing the neck of said bottle, a nrst coating on the inner side of said foil of a dried nlm of a heat-softening resin selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl butyrals and phthalic anhydride-ethylene glycol resins, and a second coating on said nrst coating of a remoistening glue compatible with the nlm of heatsoftening resin, and the radial edge portions of said sector which overlap being united by said coatings.

CHARLES S. PRICE.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification215/232, 215/274, 215/251, 215/256, 53/478, 493/128, 53/488, 493/152
International ClassificationB65D41/00, B65D41/62
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/62
European ClassificationB65D41/62